Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 233

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

something nice'-she stopped, and looked at him, flickering with a smile. Then she pointed to the ovary beneath the flower, and said: 'Result: crab-apples!'
She continued to look at him, and to smile. He said nothing. So they went on to where they could climb the fence into the spinney. She climbed to the top rail, holding by an oak-bough. Then she let him lift her down bodily.
`Ah!' she said, `you like to show me how strong you are -a veritable Samson!'-she mocked, although she had invited him with her eyes to take her in his arms.
We were entering the spinney of black poplar. In the hedge was an elm-tree, with myriads of dark dots pointed against the bright sky, myriads of clusters of flaky green fruit.
`Look at that elm,' she said, `you'd think it was in full leaf, wouldn't you? Do you know why it's so prolific?'
`No,' he said, with a curious questioning drawl of the monosyllable.
'It 's casting its bread upon the winds-no, it is dying, so it puts out all its strength and loads its boughs with the last fruit. It 'll be dead next year. If you 're here then, come and see. Look at the ivy, the suave smooth ivy, with its fingers in the tree's throat. Trees know how to die, you see-we don't.'
With her whimsical moods she tormented him. She was at the bottom a seething confusion of emotion, and she wanted to make him likewise.
`If we were trees with ivy-instead of being fine humans with free active life-we should hug our thinning lives, shouldn't we?'
`I suppose we should.'
'You, for instance-fancy your sacrificing yourself-for the next generation-that reminds you of Schopenhauer, doesn't it?-for the next generation, or love, or anything!'
He did not answer her; she was too swift for him. They passed on under the poplars, which were hanging strings of green beads above them. There was a little open space, with tufts of bluebells. Lettie stooped over a wood-pigeon that lay on the ground on its breast, its wings half spread. She took it up-its eyes were bursten and bloody; she felt its breast, ruffling the dimming iris on its throat.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE something nice'-she stopped, and looked at him, flickering with a smile. Then she pointed to what is ovary beneath what is flower, and said: 'Result: crab-apples!' She continued to look at him, and to smile. He said nothing. So they went on to where they could climb what is fence into what is spinney. She climbed to what is top rail, holding by an oak-bough. Then she let him lift her down bodily. `Ah!' she said, `you like to show me how strong you are -a veritable Samson!'-she mocked, although she had invited him with her eyes to take her in his arms. We were entering what is spinney of black poplar. In what is hedge was an elm-tree, with myriads of dark dots pointed against what is bright sky, myriads of clusters of flaky green fruit. `Look at that elm,' she said, `you'd think it was in full leaf, wouldn't you? Do you know why it's so prolific?' `No,' he said, with a curious questioning drawl of what is monosyllable. 'It 's casting its bread upon what is winds-no, it is dying, so it puts out all its strength and loads its boughs with what is last fruit. It 'll be dead next year. If you 're here then, come and see. Look at what is ivy, what is suave smooth ivy, with its fingers in what is tree's throat. Trees know how to die, you see-we don't.' With her whimsical moods she tormented him. She was at what is bottom a seething confusion of emotion, and she wanted to make him likewise. `If we were trees with ivy-instead of being fine humans with free active life-we should hug our thinning lives, shouldn't we?' `I suppose we should.' 'You, for instance-fancy your sacrificing yourself-for what is next generation-that reminds you of Schopenhauer, doesn't it?-for what is next generation, or love, or anything!' He did not answer her; she was too swift for him. They passed on under what is poplars, which were hanging strings of green beads above them. There was a little open space, with tufts of bluebells. Lettie stooped over a wood-pigeon that lay on what is ground on its breast, its wings half spread. She took it up-its eyes were bursten and bloody; she felt its breast, ruffling what is dimming iris on its throat. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 233 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" something nice'-she stopped, and looked at him, flickering with a smile. Then she pointed to what is ovary beneath what is flower, and said: 'Result: crab-apples!' She continued to look at him, and to smile. He said nothing. So they went on to where they could climb what is fence into what is spinney. She climbed to what is top rail, holding by an oak-bough. Then she let him lift her down bodily. `Ah!' she said, `you like to show me how strong you are -a veritable Samson!'-she mocked, although she had invited him with her eyes to take her in his arms. We were entering what is spinney of black poplar. In what is hedge was an elm-tree, with myriads of dark dots pointed against what is bright sky, myriads of clusters of flaky green fruit. `Look at that elm,' she said, `you'd think it was in full leaf, wouldn't you? Do you know why it's so prolific?' `No,' he said, with a curious questioning drawl of what is monosyllable. 'It 's casting its bread upon what is winds-no, it is dying, so it puts out all its strength and loads its boughs with what is last fruit. It 'll be dead next year. If you 're here then, come and see. Look at what is ivy, what is suave smooth ivy, with its fingers in what is tree's throat. Trees know how to die, you see-we don't.' With her whimsical moods she tormented him. She was at what is bottom a seething confusion of emotion, and she wanted to make him likewise. `If we were trees with ivy-instead of being fine humans with free active life-we should hug our thinning lives, shouldn't we?' `I suppose we should.' 'You, for instance-fancy your sacrificing yourself-for what is next generation-that reminds you of Schopenhauer, doesn't it?-for what is next generation, or love, or anything!' He did not answer her; she was too swift for him. They passed on under what is poplars, which were hanging strings of green beads above them. There was a little open space, with tufts of bluebells. Lettie stooped over a wood-pigeon that lay on what is ground on its breast, its wings half spread. She took it up-its eyes were bursten and bloody; she felt its breast, ruffling what is dimming iris on its throat. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363