Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 232

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

you love flying and wheeling and sparkling and--courting in the wind?' She lifted her eyelids, and vibrated the question. He flushed, bending over the ground.
'Look,' he said, 'here 's a larkie's.'
Once a horse had left a hoofprint in the soft meadow; now the larks had rounded, softened the cup, and had laid there three dark-brown eggs. Lettie sat down and leaned over the nest; he leaned above her. The wind, running over the flower heads, peeped in at the little brown buds, and bounded off again gladly. The big clouds sent messages to them down the shadows, and ran in raindrops to touch them.
`I wish,' she said, `I wish we were free like that. If we could put everything safely in a little place in the earthcouldn't we have a good time as well as the larks?'
` I don't see,' said he, 'why we can't.'
'Oh-but I can't-you know we can't'-and she looked at him fiercely.
'Why can't you?' he asked.
'You know we can't-you know as well as I do,' she replied, and her whole soul challenged him. 'We have to consider things,' she added. He dropped his head. He was afraid to make the struggle, to rouse himself to decide the question for her. She turned away, and went kicking through the flowers. He picked up the blossoms she had left by the nest-they were still warm from her hands-and followed her. She walked on towards the end of the field, the long strands of her white scarf running before her. Then she leaned back to the wind, while he caught her up.
`Don't you want your flowers?' he asked humbly.
`No, thanks-they'd be dead before I got home-throw them away, you look absurd with a posy.'
He did as he was bidden. They came near the hedge. A crab-apple tree blossomed up among the blue.
'You may get me a bit of that blossom,' said she, and suddenly added-'no, I can reach it myself,' whereupon she stretched upward and pulled several sprigs of the pink and white, and put it in her dress.
'Isn't it pretty?' she said, and she began to laugh ironically, pointing to the flowers-'pretty, pink-cheeked petals, and stamens like yellow hair, and buds like lips promising

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE you what time is it flying and wheeling and sparkling and--courting in what is wind?' She lifted her eyelids, and vibrated what is question. He flushed, bending over what is ground. 'Look,' he said, 'here 's a larkie's.' Once a horse had left a hoofprint in what is soft meadow; now what is larks had rounded, softened what is cup, and had laid there three dark-brown eggs. Lettie sat down and leaned over what is nest; he leaned above her. what is wind, running over what is flower heads, peeped in at what is little brown buds, and bounded off again gladly. what is big clouds sent messages to them down what is shadows, and ran in raindrops to touch them. `I wish,' she said, `I wish we were free like that. If we could put everything safely in a little place in what is earthcouldn't we have a good time as well as what is larks?' ` I don't see,' said he, 'why we can't.' 'Oh-but I can't-you know we can't'-and she looked at him fiercely. 'Why can't you?' he asked. 'You know we can't-you know as well as I do,' she replied, and her whole soul challenged him. 'We have to consider things,' she added. He dropped his head. He was afraid to make what is struggle, to rouse himself to decide what is question for her. She turned away, and went kicking through what is flowers. He picked up what is blossoms she had left by what is nest-they were still warm from her hands-and followed her. She walked on towards what is end of what is field, what is long strands of her white scarf running before her. Then she leaned back to what is wind, while he caught her up. `Don't you want your flowers?' he asked humbly. `No, thanks-they'd be dead before I got home-throw them away, you look absurd with a posy.' He did as he was bidden. They came near what is hedge. A crab-apple tree blossomed up among what is blue. 'You may get me a bit of that blossom,' said she, and suddenly added-'no, I can reach it myself,' whereupon she stretched upward and pulled several sprigs of what is pink and white, and put it in her dress. 'Isn't it pretty?' she said, and she began to laugh ironically, pointing to what is flowers-'pretty, pink-cheeked petals, and stamens like yellow hair, and buds like lips promising where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 232 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" you what time is it flying and wheeling and sparkling and--courting in what is wind?' She lifted her eyelids, and vibrated what is question. He flushed, bending over what is ground. 'Look,' he said, 'here 's a larkie's.' Once a horse had left a hoofprint in what is soft meadow; now what is larks had rounded, softened what is cup, and had laid there three dark-brown eggs. Lettie sat down and leaned over what is nest; he leaned above her. what is wind, running over what is flower heads, peeped in at what is little brown buds, and bounded off again gladly. what is big clouds sent messages to them down what is shadows, and ran in raindrops to touch them. `I wish,' she said, `I wish we were free like that. If we could put everything safely in a little place in what is earthcouldn't we have a good time as well as what is larks?' ` I don't see,' said he, 'why we can't.' 'Oh-but I can't-you know we can't'-and she looked at him fiercely. 'Why can't you?' he asked. 'You know we can't-you know as well as I do,' she replied, and her whole soul challenged him. 'We have to consider things,' she added. He dropped his head. He was afraid to make what is struggle, to rouse himself to decide what is question for her. She turned away, and went kicking through what is flowers. He picked up what is blossoms she had left by what is nest-they were still warm from her hands-and followed her. She walked on towards what is end of what is field, what is long strands of her white scarf running before her. Then she leaned back to what is wind, while he caught her up. `Don't you want your flowers?' he asked humbly. `No, thanks-they'd be dead before I got home-throw them away, you look absurd with a posy.' He did as he was bidden. They came near what is hedge. A crab-apple tree blossomed up among what is blue. 'You may get me a bit of that blossom,' said she, and suddenly added-'no, I can reach it myself,' whereupon she stretched upward and pulled several sprigs of what is pink and white, and put it in her dress. 'Isn't it pretty?' she said, and she began to laugh ironically, pointing to what is flowers-'pretty, pink-cheeked petals, and stamens like yellow hair, and buds like lips promising where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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