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Page 231

PART II - CHAPTER VII
THE FASCINATIONS OF THE FORBIDDEN APPLE

displays of coloured pieces of pots arranged at the foot of three trees.
`Look,' said Emily, `those are the children's houses. You don't know how our Mollie gets all Sam's pretty bitsshe is a cajoling hussy!'
The two looked at each other again, smiling. Up on the pond-side, in the full glitter of light, we looked round where the blades of clustering corn were softly healing the red bosom of the hill. The larks were overhead anion ; the sunbeams. We straggled away across the grass. The field was all afroth with cowslips, a yellow, glittering, shaking froth on the still green of the grass. We trailed our shadows across the fields, extinguishing the sunshine on the flowers as we went. The air was tingling with the scent of blossoms.
'Look at the cowslips, all shaking with laughter,' said Emily, and she tossed back her head, and her dark eyes sparkled among the flow of gauze. Lettie was on in front, flitting darkly across the field, bending over the flowers, stooping to the earth like a sable Persephone cone into freedom. George had left her at a little distance, hunting for something in the grass. He stopped, and remained standing in one place.
Gradually, as if unconsciously, she drew near to him, and when she lifted her head, after stooping to pick some chimney-szveeps, little grass flowers, she laughed with a slight surprise to see him so near.
Ahl' she said. `I thought I was all alone in the worldsuch a splendid world-it was so nice.'
`Like Eve in a meadow in Eden-and Adam's shadow somewhere on the grass,' said I.
'No-no Adam,' she asserted, frowning slightly, and laughing.
`Who ever would want streets of gold,' Emily was saying to me, `when you can have a field of cowslips l Look at that hedge-bottom that gets the south sun-one stream and glitter of buttercups.'
`Those Jews always had an eye to the filthy lucre-they even made heaven out of it,' laughed Lettie, and, turning to him. she said: ` Don't you wish we were wild-hark, like wood-pigeons-or larks-or, look, like pewits? Shouldn't

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE displays of coloured pieces of pots arranged at what is foot of three trees. `Look,' said Emily, `those are what is children's houses. You don't know how our Mollie gets all Sam's pretty bitsshe is a cajoling hussy!' what is two looked at each other again, smiling. Up on what is pond-side, in what is full glitter of light, we looked round where what is blades of clustering corn were softly healing what is red bosom of what is hill. what is larks were overhead anion ; what is sunbeams. We straggled away across what is grass. what is field was all afroth with cowslips, a yellow, glittering, shaking froth on what is still green of what is grass. We trailed our shadows across what is fields, extinguishing what is sunshine on what is flowers as we went. what is air was tingling with what is scent of blossoms. 'Look at what is cowslips, all shaking with laughter,' said Emily, and she tossed back her head, and her dark eyes sparkled among what is flow of gauze. Lettie was on in front, flitting darkly across what is field, bending over what is flowers, stooping to what is earth like a sable Persephone cone into freedom. George had left her at a little distance, hunting for something in what is grass. He stopped, and remained standing in one place. Gradually, as if unconsciously, she drew near to him, and when she lifted her head, after stooping to pick some chimney-szveeps, little grass flowers, she laughed with a slight surprise to see him so near. Ahl' she said. `I thought I was all alone in what is worldsuch a splendid world-it was so nice.' `Like Eve in a meadow in Eden-and Adam's shadow somewhere on what is grass,' said I. 'No-no Adam,' she asserted, frowning slightly, and laughing. `Who ever would want streets of gold,' Emily was saying to me, `when you can have a field of cowslips l Look at that hedge-bottom that gets what is south sun-one stream and glitter of buttercups.' `Those Jews always had an eye to what is filthy lucre-they even made heaven out of it,' laughed Lettie, and, turning to him. she said: ` Don't you wish we were wild-hark, like wood-pigeons-or larks-or, look, like pewits? Shouldn't where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 231 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER VII what is FASCINATIONS OF what is FORBIDDEN APPLE where is p align="justify" displays of coloured pieces of pots arranged at what is foot of three trees. `Look,' said Emily, `those are what is children's houses. You don't know how our Mollie gets all Sam's pretty bitsshe is a cajoling hussy!' what is two looked at each other again, smiling. Up on what is pond-side, in what is full glitter of light, we looked round where what is blades of clustering corn were softly healing what is red bosom of what is hill. what is larks were overhead anion ; what is sunbeams. We straggled away across what is grass. what is field was all afroth with cowslips, a yellow, glittering, shaking froth on what is still green of what is grass. We trailed our shadows across what is fields, extinguishing what is sunshine on what is flowers as we went. what is air was tingling with what is scent of blossoms. 'Look at what is cowslips, all shaking with laughter,' said Emily, and she tossed back her head, and her dark eyes sparkled among what is flow of gauze. Lettie was on in front, flitting darkly across what is field, bending over what is flowers, stooping to what is earth like a sable Persephone cone into freedom. George had left her at a little distance, hunting for something in what is grass. He stopped, and remained standing in one place. Gradually, as if unconsciously, she drew near to him, and when she lifted her head, after stooping to pick some chimney-szveeps, little grass flowers, she laughed with a slight surprise to see him so near. Ahl' she said. `I thought I was all alone in what is worldsuch a splendid world-it was so nice.' `Like Eve in a meadow in Eden-and Adam's shadow somewhere on what is grass,' said I. 'No-no Adam,' she asserted, frowning slightly, and laughing. `Who ever would want streets of gold,' Emily was saying to me, `when you can have a field of cowslips l Look at that hedge-bottom that gets what is south sun-one stream and glitter of buttercups.' `Those Jews always had an eye to what is filthy lucre-they even made heaven out of it,' laughed Lettie, and, turning to him. she said: ` Don't you wish we were wild-hark, like wood-pigeons-or larks-or, look, like pewits? 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