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Page 216

PART II - CHAPTER V
AN ARROW FROM THE IMPATIENT GOD

It was not many yards to the house. A maid-servant saw us, came running out, and went running back, like the frightened lapwing from the wounded cat.
We waited until the doctor came. There was a deep graze down the side of the head - serious, but not dangerous; there was a cut across the cheek-bone that would leave a scar; and the collar-bone was broken. I stayed until he had recovered consciousness. `Lettie,' he wanted Lettie, so she had to remain at Highclose all night. I went home to tell my mother.
When I went to bed I looked across at the lighted windows of Highclose, and the lights trailed mistily towards me across the water. The cedar stood dark guard against the house; bright the windows were, like the stars, and, like the stars, covering their torment in brightness. The sky was glittering with sharp lights-they are too far off to take trouble for us, so little, little almost to nothingness. All the great hollow vastness roars overhead, and the stars are only sparks that whirl and spin in the restless space. The earth must listen to us ; she covers her face with a thin veil of mist, and is sad; she soaks up our blood tenderly, in the darkness, grieving, and in the light she soothes and reassures us. Here on our earth is sympathy and hope, the heavens have nothing but distances.
A corncrake talked to me across the valley, talked and talked endlessly, asking and answering in hoarse tones from the sleeping, mist -hidden meadows. The monotonous voice, that on past summer evenings had had pleasant notes of romance, now was intolerable to me. Its inflexible harshness and cacophony seemed like the voice of fate speaking out its tuneless perseverance in the night.
In the morning Lettie came home wan, sad-eyed, and self-reproachful. After a short time they came for her, as he wanted her again.
When in the evening I went to see George, he too was very despondent.
'It's no good now,' said I. 'You should have insisted and made your own destiny.'
'Yes-perhaps so,' he drawled, in his best reflective manner.
' I would have had her-she'd have been glad if you'd

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It was not many yards to what is house. A maid-servant saw us, came running out, and went running back, like what is frightened lapwing from what is wounded cat. We waited until what is doctor came. There was a deep graze down what is side of what is head - serious, but not dangerous; there was a cut across what is cheek-bone that would leave a scar; and what is collar-bone was broken. I stayed until he had recovered consciousness. `Lettie,' he wanted Lettie, so she had to remain at Highclose all night. I went home to tell my mother. When I went to bed I looked across at what is lighted windows of Highclose, and what is lights trailed mistily towards me across what is water. what is cedar stood dark guard against what is house; bright what is windows were, like what is stars, and, like what is stars, covering their torment in brightness. what is sky was glittering with sharp lights-they are too far off to take trouble for us, so little, little almost to nothingness. All what is great hollow vastness roars overhead, and what is stars are only sparks that whirl and spin in what is restless space. what is earth must listen to us ; she covers her face with a thin veil of mist, and is sad; she soaks up our blood tenderly, in what is darkness, grieving, and in what is light she soothes and reassures us. Here on our earth is sympathy and hope, what is heavens have nothing but distances. A corncrake talked to me across what is valley, talked and talked endlessly, asking and answering in hoarse tones from what is sleeping, mist -hidden meadows. what is monotonous voice, that on past summer evenings had had pleasant notes of romance, now was intolerable to me. Its inflexible harshness and cacophony seemed like what is voice of fate speaking out its tuneless perseverance in what is night. In what is morning Lettie came home wan, sad-eyed, and self-reproachful. After a short time they came for her, as he wanted her again. When in what is evening I went to see George, he too was very despondent. 'It's no good now,' said I. 'You should have insisted and made your own destiny.' 'Yes-perhaps so,' he drawled, in his best reflective manner. ' I would have had her-she'd have been glad if you'd where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 216 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER V AN ARROW FROM what is IMPATIENT GOD where is p align="justify" It was not many yards to what is house. A maid-servant saw us, came running out, and went running back, like what is frightened lapwing from what is wounded cat. We waited until what is doctor came. There was a deep graze down what is side of what is head - serious, but not dangerous; there was a cut across what is cheek-bone that would leave a scar; and what is collar-bone was broken. I stayed until he had recovered consciousness. `Lettie,' he wanted Lettie, so she had to remain at Highclose all night. I went home to tell my mother. When I went to bed I looked across at what is lighted windows of Highclose, and what is lights trailed mistily towards me across what is water. what is cedar stood dark guard against what is house; bright what is windows were, like what is stars, and, like what is stars, covering their torment in brightness. what is sky was glittering with sharp lights-they are too far off to take trouble for us, so little, little almost to nothingness. All what is great hollow vastness roars overhead, and what is stars are only sparks that whirl and spin in what is restless space. what is earth must listen to us ; she covers her face with a thin veil of mist, and is sad; she soaks up our blood tenderly, in what is darkness, grieving, and in what is light she soothes and reassures us. Here on our earth is sympathy and hope, what is heavens have nothing but distances. A corncrake talked to me across what is valley, talked and talked endlessly, asking and answering in hoarse tones from what is sleeping, mist -hidden meadows. what is monotonous voice, that on past summer evenings had had pleasant notes of romance, now was intolerable to me. Its inflexible harshness and cacophony seemed like what is voice of fate speaking out its tuneless perseverance in what is night. In what is morning Lettie came home wan, sad-eyed, and self-reproachful. After a short time they came for her, as he wanted her again. When in what is evening I went to see George, he too was very despondent. 'It's no good now,' said I. 'You should have insisted and made your own destiny.' 'Yes-perhaps so,' he drawled, in his best reflective manner. ' I would have had her-she'd have been glad if you'd where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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