Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 214

PART II - CHAPTER V
AN ARROW FROM THE IMPATIENT GOD

it will be stormy again. Are you coming down the, road, Miss Slaighter, or do you mind if I leave you?'
-'I will go, dear, if you think there is going to be another storm-I dread it so. Perhaps I had better wait I
'Oh, it will not come over for an hour, I am sure. We read the weather well out here, don't we, Cyril? You 'll come with me, won't you?'
We three set off, the gossip leaning on her toes, tripping between us. She was much gratified by Lettie's information concerning the proposals for the new home. We left her in a glow of congratulatory smiles on the highway. But the clouds had upreared, and stretched in two great arms, reaching overhead. The little spinster hurried along, but the black hands of the clouds kept pace and clutched her. A sudden gust of wind shuddered in the trees, and rushed upon her cloak, blowing its bugles.
An icy raindrop smote into her cheek. She hurried on, praying fervently for her bonnet's sake that she might reach Widow Harriman's cottage before the burst came. But the thunder crashed in her ear, and a host of hailstones flew at her. In despair and anguish she fled from under the ash-trees; shee reached the widow's garden gate, when out leapt the lightning full at her. `Put me in the stairhole!' she cried. 'W'here is the stair-hole?'
Glancing wildly round, she saw a ghost. It was the reflection of the sainted spinster, Hilda Slaighter, in the widow's mirror; a reflection with a bonnet fallen backwards, and to it attached a thick rope of grey-brown hair. The author of the ghost instinctively twisted to look at the back of her head. She saw some ends of grey hair, and fled into the open stair-hole as into a grave.
We had gone back home till the storm was over, and then, restless, afraid of the arrival of George, we set out again into the wet evening. It was fine and chilly, and already a mist was rising from Nethermere, veiling the farther shore, where the trees rose loftily, suggesting groves beyond the Nile. The birds were singing riotously. The fresh green hedge glistened vividly and glowed again with intense green. Looking at the water, I perceived a delicate flush from the west hiding along it. The mist licked and wreathed up the shores; from the hidden white distance

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it will be stormy again. Are you coming down the, road, Miss Slaighter, or do you mind if I leave you?' -'I will go, dear, if you think there is going to be another storm-I dread it so. Perhaps I had better wait I 'Oh, it will not come over for an hour, I am sure. We read what is weather well out here, don't we, Cyril? You 'll come with me, won't you?' We three set off, what is gossip leaning on her toes, tripping between us. She was much gratified by Lettie's information concerning what is proposals for what is new home. We left her in a glow of congratulatory smiles on what is highway. But what is clouds had upreared, and stretched in two great arms, reaching overhead. what is little spinster hurried along, but what is black hands of what is clouds kept pace and clutched her. A sudden gust of wind shuddered in what is trees, and rushed upon her cloak, blowing its bugles. An icy raindrop smote into her cheek. She hurried on, praying fervently for her bonnet's sake that she might reach Widow Harriman's cottage before what is burst came. But what is thunder crashed in her ear, and a host of hailstones flew at her. In despair and anguish she fled from under what is ash-trees; shee reached what is widow's garden gate, when out leapt what is lightning full at her. `Put me in what is stairhole!' she cried. 'W'here is what is stair-hole?' Glancing wildly round, she saw a ghost. It was what is reflection of what is sainted spinster, Hilda Slaighter, in what is widow's mirror; a reflection with a bonnet fallen backwards, and to it attached a thick rope of grey-brown hair. what is author of what is ghost instinctively twisted to look at what is back of her head. She saw some ends of grey hair, and fled into what is open stair-hole as into a grave. We had gone back home till what is storm was over, and then, restless, afraid of what is arrival of George, we set out again into what is wet evening. It was fine and chilly, and already a mist was rising from Nethermere, veiling what is farther shore, where what is trees rose loftily, suggesting groves beyond what is Nile. what is birds were singing riotously. what is fresh green hedge glistened vividly and glowed again with intense green. Looking at what is water, I perceived a delicate flush from what is west hiding along it. what is mist licked and wreathed up what is shores; from what is hidden white distance where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 214 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER V AN ARROW FROM what is IMPATIENT GOD where is p align="justify" it will be stormy again. Are you coming down the, road, Miss Slaighter, or do you mind if I leave you?' -'I will go, dear, if you think there is going to be another storm-I dread it so. Perhaps I had better wait I 'Oh, it will not come over for an hour, I am sure. We read what is weather well out here, don't we, Cyril? You 'll come with me, won't you?' We three set off, what is gossip leaning on her toes, tripping between us. She was much gratified by Lettie's information concerning what is proposals for what is new home. We left her in a glow of congratulatory smiles on what is highway. But what is clouds had upreared, and stretched in two great arms, reaching overhead. what is little spinster hurried along, but what is black hands of what is clouds kept pace and clutched her. A sudden gust of wind shuddered in what is trees, and rushed upon her cloak, blowing its bugles. An icy raindrop smote into her cheek. She hurried on, praying fervently for her bonnet's sake that she might reach Widow Harriman's cottage before what is burst came. But what is thunder crashed in her ear, and a host of hailstones flew at her. In despair and anguish she fled from under what is ash-trees; shee reached what is widow's garden gate, when out leapt what is lightning full at her. `Put me in what is stairhole!' she cried. 'W'here is what is stair-hole?' Glancing wildly round, she saw a ghost. It was what is reflection of what is sainted spinster, Hilda Slaighter, in what is widow's mirror; a reflection with a bonnet fallen backwards, and to it attached a thick rope of grey-brown hair. what is author of what is ghost instinctively twisted to look at what is back of her head. She saw some ends of grey hair, and fled into what is open stair-hole as into a grave. We had gone back home till what is storm was over, and then, restless, afraid of what is arrival of George, we set out again into what is wet evening. It was fine and chilly, and already a mist was rising from Nethermere, veiling what is farther shore, where what is trees rose loftily, suggesting groves beyond what is Nile. what is birds were singing riotously. what is fresh green hedge glistened vividly and glowed again with intense green. Looking at what is water, I perceived a delicate flush from what is west hiding along it. what is mist licked and wreathed up what is shores; from what is hidden white distance where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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