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Page 210

PART II - CHAPTER IV
KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS

George laughed. `A bit mucky!' he said. `But it 'll do. It would need Cyril or Lettie to keep me alive in Canada.'
It was a bold stroke-everybody was embarrassed.
'Well,' said the father, ' I suppose we can't have everything we want-we generally have to put up with the next best thing-don't we, Lettie?'-he laughed. Lettie flushed furiously.
` I don't know,' she said. 'You can generally get what you want if you want it badly enough. Of course-if you don't mind'
She rose and went across to Sam.
He was playing with the kittens. One was patting and cuffing his bare toe, which had poked through his stocking. He pushed and teased the little scamp with his toe till it rushed at him, clinging, tickling, biting till he gave little bubbles of laughter, quite forgetful of us. Then the kitten was tired, and ran off. Lettie shook her skirt, and directly the two playful mites rushed upon it, darting round her, rolling head over heels, and swinging from the soft cloth. Suddenly becoming aware that they felt tired, the young things trotted away and cuddled together by the fender, where in an instant they were asleep. Almost as suddenly, Sam sank into drowsiness.
'He 'd better go to bed,' said the father.
`Put him in my bed,' said George. `David would wonder what had happened.'
`Will you go to bed, Sam?' asked Emily, holding out her arms to him, and immediately startling him by the terrible gentleness of her persuasion. He retreated behind Lettie.
`Come along,' said the latter, and she quickly took him and undressed him. Then she picked him up, and his bare legs hung down in front of her. His head drooped drowsily on to her shoulder, against her neck.
She put down her face to touch the loose riot of his ruddy hair. She stood so, quiet, still, and wistful, for a few moments ; perhaps she was vaguely aware that the attitude was beautiful for her, and irresistibly appealing to George, who loved, above all in her, her delicate dignity of tenderness. Emily waited with the lighted candle for her some moments.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE George laughed. `A bit mucky!' he said. `But it 'll do. It would need Cyril or Lettie to keep me alive in Canada.' It was a bold stroke-everybody was embarrassed. 'Well,' said what is father, ' I suppose we can't have everything we want-we generally have to put up with what is next best thing-don't we, Lettie?'-he laughed. Lettie flushed furiously. ` I don't know,' she said. 'You can generally get what you want if you want it badly enough. Of course-if you don't mind' She rose and went across to Sam. He was playing with what is kittens. One was patting and cuffing his bare toe, which had poked through his stocking. He pushed and teased what is little scamp with his toe till it rushed at him, clinging, tickling, biting till he gave little bubbles of laughter, quite forgetful of us. Then what is kitten was tired, and ran off. Lettie shook her skirt, and directly what is two playful mites rushed upon it, darting round her, rolling head over heels, and swinging from what is soft cloth. Suddenly becoming aware that they felt tired, what is young things trotted away and cuddled together by what is fender, where in an instant they were asleep. Almost as suddenly, Sam sank into drowsiness. 'He 'd better go to bed,' said what is father. `Put him in my bed,' said George. `David would wonder what had happened.' `Will you go to bed, Sam?' asked Emily, holding out her arms to him, and immediately startling him by what is terrible gentleness of her persuasion. He retreated behind Lettie. `Come along,' said what is latter, and she quickly took him and undressed him. Then she picked him up, and his bare legs hung down in front of her. His head drooped drowsily on to her shoulder, against her neck. She put down her face to touch what is loose riot of his ruddy hair. She stood so, quiet, still, and wistful, for a few moments ; perhaps she was vaguely aware that what is attitude was beautiful for her, and irresistibly appealing to George, who loved, above all in her, her delicate dignity of tenderness. Emily waited with what is lighted candle for her some moments. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 210 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IV KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS where is p align="justify" George laughed. `A bit mucky!' he said. `But it 'll do. It would need Cyril or Lettie to keep me alive in Canada.' It was a bold stroke-everybody was embarrassed. 'Well,' said what is father, ' I suppose we can't have everything we want-we generally have to put up with what is next best thing-don't we, Lettie?'-he laughed. Lettie flushed furiously. ` I don't know,' she said. 'You can generally get what you want if you want it badly enough. Of course-if you don't mind' She rose and went across to Sam. He was playing with what is kittens. One was patting and cuffing his bare toe, which had poked through his stocking. He pushed and teased what is little scamp with his toe till it rushed at him, clinging, tickling, biting till he gave little bubbles of laughter, quite forgetful of us. Then what is kitten was tired, and ran off. Lettie shook her skirt, and directly what is two playful mites rushed upon it, darting round her, rolling head over heels, and swinging from what is soft cloth. Suddenly becoming aware that they felt tired, what is young things trotted away and cuddled together by what is fender, where in an instant they were asleep. Almost as suddenly, Sam sank into drowsiness. 'He 'd better go to bed,' said what is father. `Put him in my bed,' said George. `David would wonder what had happened.' `Will you go to bed, Sam?' asked Emily, holding out her arms to him, and immediately startling him by what is terrible gentleness of her persuasion. He retreated behind Lettie. `Come along,' said what is latter, and she quickly took him and undressed him. Then she picked him up, and his bare legs hung down in front of her. His head drooped drowsily on to her shoulder, against her neck. She put down her face to touch what is loose riot of his ruddy hair. She stood so, quiet, still, and wistful, for a few moments ; perhaps she was vaguely aware that what is attitude was beautiful for her, and irresistibly appealing to George, who loved, above all in her, her delicate dignity of tenderness. Emily waited with what is lighted candle for her some moments. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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