Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 208

PART II - CHAPTER IV
KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS

`If you would,' said George, `I 'd go with you. But not by myself, to become a fat stupid fool, like my own cattle.'
While he was speaking Gyp burst into a rage of barking. The father got up to see what it was, and George followed. Trip, the great bull-terrier, rushed out of the house shaking the buildings with his roars. We saw the white dog flash down the yard, we heard a rattle from the hen-house ladder, and in a moment a scream from the orchard side.
We rushed forward, and there on the sharp bankside lay a little figure, face down, and Trip standing over it, looking rather puzzled.
I picked up the child-it was Sam. He struggled as soon as he felt my hands, but I bore him off to the house. He wriggled like a wild hare, and kicked, but at last he was still. I set him on the hearthrug to examine him. He was a quaint little figure, dressed in a man's trousers that had been botched small for him, and a coat hanging in rags.
`Did he get hold of you?' asked the father. 'Where was it he got hold of you?'
But the child stood unanswering, his little lips pinched together, his eyes staring out at nothing. Emily went on her knees before him, and put her face close to his, saying, with a voice that made one shrink from its unbridled emotion of caress :
'Did he hurt you, eh?-tell us where he hurt you.' She would have put her arms around him, but he shrank away.
'Look here,' said Lettie, 'it 's here-and it 's bleeding. Go and get some water, Emily, and some rags. Come on, Sam, let me look and I'll put some rags round it. Come along.'
She took the child and stripped him of his grotesque garments. Trip had given him a sharp grab on the thigh before he had realized that he was dealing with a little boy. It was not much, however, and Lettie soon had it bathed, and anointed with elder-flower ointment. On the boy's body were several scars and bruises-evidently he had rough times. Lettie tended to him and dressed him again. He endured these attention like a trapped wild rabbitnever looking at us, never opening his lips-only shrinking slightly. When Lettie had put on him his torn little shirt, and had gathered the great breeches about him, Emily

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `If you would,' said George, `I 'd go with you. But not by myself, to become a fat stupid fool, like my own cattle.' While he was speaking Gyp burst into a rage of barking. what is father got up to see what it was, and George followed. Trip, what is great bull-terrier, rushed out of what is house shaking what is buildings with his roars. We saw what is white dog flash down what is yard, we heard a rattle from what is hen-house ladder, and in a moment a scream from what is orchard side. We rushed forward, and there on what is sharp bankside lay a little figure, face down, and Trip standing over it, looking rather puzzled. I picked up what is child-it was Sam. He struggled as soon as he felt my hands, but I bore him off to what is house. He wriggled like a wild hare, and kicked, but at last he was still. I set him on what is hearthrug to examine him. He was a quaint little figure, dressed in a man's trousers that had been botched small for him, and a coat hanging in rags. `Did he get hold of you?' asked what is father. 'Where was it he got hold of you?' But what is child stood unanswering, his little lips pinched together, his eyes staring out at nothing. Emily went on her knees before him, and put her face close to his, saying, with a voice that made one shrink from its unbridled emotion of caress : 'Did he hurt you, eh?-tell us where he hurt you.' She would have put her arms around him, but he shrank away. 'Look here,' said Lettie, 'it 's here-and it 's bleeding. Go and get some water, Emily, and some rags. Come on, Sam, let me look and I'll put some rags round it. Come along.' She took what is child and stripped him of his grotesque garments. Trip had given him a sharp grab on what is thigh before he had realized that he was dealing with a little boy. It was not much, however, and Lettie soon had it bathed, and anointed with elder-flower ointment. On what is boy's body were several scars and bruises-evidently he had rough times. Lettie tended to him and dressed him again. He endured these attention like a trapped wild rabbitnever looking at us, never opening his lips-only shrinking slightly. When Lettie had put on him his torn little shirt, and had gathered what is great breeches about him, Emily where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 208 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IV KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS where is p align="justify" `If you would,' said George, `I 'd go with you. But not by myself, to become a fat stupid fool, like my own cattle.' While he was speaking Gyp burst into a rage of barking. what is father got up to see what it was, and George followed. Trip, what is great bull-terrier, rushed out of what is house shaking what is buildings with his roars. We saw what is white dog flash down what is yard, we heard a rattle from what is hen-house ladder, and in a moment a scream from what is orchard side. We rushed forward, and there on what is sharp bankside lay a little figure, face down, and Trip standing over it, looking rather puzzled. I picked up what is child-it was Sam. He struggled as soon as he felt my hands, but I bore him off to what is house. He wriggled like a wild hare, and kicked, but at last he was still. I set him on what is hearthrug to examine him. He was a quaint little figure, dressed in a man's trousers that had been botched small for him, and a coat hanging in rags. `Did he get hold of you?' asked what is father. 'Where was it he got hold of you?' But what is child stood unanswering, his little lips pinched together, his eyes staring out at nothing. Emily went on her knees before him, and put her face close to his, saying, with a voice that made one shrink from its unbridled emotion of caress : 'Did he hurt you, eh?-tell us where he hurt you.' She would have put her arms around him, but he shrank away. 'Look here,' said Lettie, 'it 's here-and it 's bleeding. Go and get some water, Emily, and some rags. Come on, Sam, let me look and I'll put some rags round it. Come along.' She took what is child and stripped him of his grotesque garments. Trip had given him a sharp grab on what is thigh before he had realized that he was dealing with a little boy. It was not much, however, and Lettie soon had it bathed, and anointed with elder-flower ointment. On what is boy's body were several scars and bruises-evidently he had rough times. Lettie tended to him and dressed him again. He endured these attention like a trapped wild rabbitnever looking at us, never opening his lips-only shrinking slightly. When Lettie had put on him his torn little shirt, and had gathered what is great breeches about him, Emily where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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