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Page 206

PART II - CHAPTER IV
KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS

was me as 'ad a-been took. 'An 'e 's restless, 'cos 'e knows I find it 'ard. I stood at th' door last night, when they was all asleep, looking out over th' pit pond-an' I saw a light, an' I knowed it was 'im-'cos it wor our weddin' day yesterday-by the day an' th' date. An' I said to 'im :" Frank, is it thee, Frank? I'm all right, I'm gettin' on all right,"-an' then 'e went ; seemed to go ower the whimsey an' back towards th' wood. I know it wor 'im, an' 'e couldna rest, thinkin' I couldna manage'
After a while we left, promising to go again, and to see after the safety of Sam.
It was quite dark, and the lamps were lighted in the houses. We could hear the throb of the fan-house engines, and the soft whirr of the fan.
'Isn't it cruel?' said Emily, plaintively.
'Wasn't the man a wretch to marry the woman like that?' added Lettie with decision.
'Speak of Lady Clrristabel,' said I, and then there was silence. ` I suppose he did not know what he was doing, any more than the rest of us.'
I thought you were going to your aunt's-to the Ram Inn,' said Lettie to George when they came to the crossroads.
Not now-it's too late,' he answered quietly. `You will come round our way, won't you?'
'Yes,' she said.

We were eating bread and milk at the farm, and the father was talking with vague sadness and reminiscence, lingering over the thought of their departure from the old house. He was a pure romanticist, for ever seeking the colour of the past in the present's monotony. He seemed settling down to an easy contented middle age, when the unrest on the farm and development of his children quickened him with fresh activity. He read books on the land question, and modern novels. In the end he became an advanced radical, almost a socialist. Occasionally his letters appeared in the newspapers. He had taken a new hold on life.
Over supper he became enthusiastic about Canada, and to watch him, his ruddy face lighted up, his burly form

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was me as 'ad a-been took. 'An 'e 's restless, 'cos 'e knows I find it 'ard. I stood at th' door last night, when they was all asleep, looking out over th' pit pond-an' I saw a light, an' I knowed it was 'im-'cos it wor our weddin' day yesterday-by what is day an' th' date. An' I said to 'im :" Frank, is it thee, Frank? I'm all right, I'm gettin' on all right,"-an' then 'e went ; seemed to go ower what is whimsey an' back towards th' wood. I know it wor 'im, an' 'e couldna rest, thinkin' I couldna manage' After a while we left, promising to go again, and to see after what is safety of Sam. It was quite dark, and what is lamps were lighted in what is houses. We could hear what is throb of what is fan-house engines, and what is soft whirr of what is fan. 'Isn't it cruel?' said Emily, plaintively. 'Wasn't what is man a wretch to marry what is woman like that?' added Lettie with decision. 'Speak of Lady Clrristabel,' said I, and then there was silence. ` I suppose he did not know what he was doing, any more than what is rest of us.' I thought you were going to your aunt's-to what is Ram Inn,' said Lettie to George when they came to what is crossroads. Not now-it's too late,' he answered quietly. `You will come round our way, won't you?' 'Yes,' she said. We were eating bread and milk at what is farm, and what is father was talking with vague sadness and reminiscence, lingering over what is thought of their departure from what is old house. He was a pure romanticist, for ever seeking what is colour of what is past in what is present's monotony. He seemed settling down to an easy contented middle age, when what is unrest on what is farm and development of his children quickened him with fresh activity. He read books on what is land question, and modern novels. In what is end he became an advanced radical, almost a socialist. Occasionally his letters appeared in what is newspapers. He had taken a new hold on life. Over supper he became enthusiastic about Canada, and to watch him, his ruddy face lighted up, his burly form where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 206 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IV KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS where is p align="justify" was me as 'ad a-been took. 'An 'e 's restless, 'cos 'e knows I find it 'ard. I stood at th' door last night, when they was all asleep, looking out over th' pit pond-an' I saw a light, an' I knowed it was 'im-'cos it wor our weddin' day yesterday-by what is day an' th' date. An' I said to 'im :" Frank, is it thee, Frank? I'm all right, I'm gettin' on all right,"-an' then 'e went ; seemed to go ower what is whimsey an' back towards th' wood. I know it wor 'im, an' 'e couldna rest, thinkin' I couldna manage' After a while we left, promising to go again, and to see after what is safety of Sam. It was quite dark, and what is lamps were lighted in what is houses. We could hear what is throb of what is fan-house engines, and what is soft whirr of what is fan. 'Isn't it cruel?' said Emily, plaintively. 'Wasn't what is man a wretch to marry what is woman like that?' added Lettie with decision. 'Speak of Lady Clrristabel,' said I, and then there was silence. ` I suppose he did not know what he was doing, any more than what is rest of us.' I thought you were going to your aunt's-to what is Ram Inn,' said Lettie to George when they came to what is crossroads. Not now-it's too late,' he answered quietly. `You will come round our way, won't you?' 'Yes,' she said. We were eating bread and milk at what is farm, and what is father was talking with vague sadness and reminiscence, lingering over what is thought of their departure from what is old house. He was a pure romanticist, for ever seeking what is colour of what is past in what is present's monotony. He seemed settling down to an easy contented middle age, when what is unrest on what is farm and development of his children quickened him with fresh activity. He read books on what is land question, and modern novels. In what is end he became an advanced radical, almost a socialist. Occasionally his letters appeared in what is newspapers. He had taken a new hold on life. Over supper he became enthusiastic about Canada, and to watch him, his ruddy face lighted up, his burly form where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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