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Page 204

PART II - CHAPTER IV
KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS

'Indeed,' said I, 'the rabbit?'
`No, there were nowt left but th' skin-they'd seen ter that, a thieving, dirt-eatin' lot.'
'When was that?' said I.
`This mortal night-an' there was th' head an' th' back in th' dirty stew-pot-I can show you this instant-I 've got 'em in our pantry for a proof, 'aven't I, Martha?'
`A fat lot o' good it is-but I'll rip th' neck out of 'in,, if ever I lay 'ands on 'im.'
At last I made out that Samuel had stolen a large, lopeared doe out of a hutch in the coal-house of the squinteyed lady, had skinned it, buried the skin, and offered his booty to his mother as a wild rabbit, trapped. The doe had been the chief item of the Annables' Sunday dinner -albeit a portion was unluckily saved till Monday, providing undeniable proof of the theft. The owner of the rabbit had supposed the creature to have escaped. This peaceful supposition had been destroyed by the combbearer's seeing her cat, scratching in the Annables' garden, unearth the white and brown doe-skin, after which the trouble had begun.
The squint-eyed woman was not so hard to manage. I talked to her as if she were some male friend of mine, only appealing to her womanliness with all the soft sadnessI could press into the tones of my voice. In the end she was mollified, and even tender and motherly in her feelings toward the unfortunate family. I left on her dresser the half-crown I shrank from offering her, and, having reduced the comb-wearer also, I marched off, carrying the stewpot and the fragments of the ill-fated doe to the cottage of the widow, where George and the girls Awaited me.
The house was in a woeful state. In the rocking-chair, beside the high guard that surrounded the hearth, sat the mother, rocking, looking sadly shaken now her excitement was over. Lettie was nursing the little baby, and Emily the next child. George was smoking his pipe and trying to look natural. The little kitchen was crowded-there was no room-there was not even a place on the table for the stew-jar, so I gathered together cups and mugs containing tea sops, and set down the vessel of ignominy
on the much slopped tea-cloth. The four little children

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Indeed,' said I, 'the rabbit?' `No, there were nowt left but th' skin-they'd seen ter that, a thieving, dirt-eatin' lot.' 'When was that?' said I. `This mortal night-an' there was th' head an' th' back in th' dirty stew-pot-I can show you this instant-I 've got 'em in our pantry for a proof, 'aven't I, Martha?' `A fat lot o' good it is-but I'll rip th' neck out of 'in,, if ever I lay 'ands on 'im.' At last I made out that Samuel had stolen a large, lopeared doe out of a hutch in what is coal-house of what is squinteyed lady, had skinned it, buried what is skin, and offered his booty to his mother as a wild rabbit, trapped. what is doe had been what is chief item of what is Annables' Sunday dinner -albeit a portion was unluckily saved till Monday, providing undeniable proof of what is theft. what is owner of what is rabbit had supposed what is creature to have escaped. This peaceful supposition had been destroyed by what is combbearer's seeing her cat, scratching in what is Annables' garden, unearth what is white and brown doe-skin, after which what is trouble had begun. what is squint-eyed woman was not so hard to manage. I talked to her as if she were some male friend of mine, only appealing to her womanliness with all what is soft sadnessI could press into what is tones of my voice. In what is end she was mollified, and even tender and motherly in her feelings toward what is unfortunate family. I left on her dresser what is half-crown I shrank from offering her, and, having reduced what is comb-wearer also, I marched off, carrying what is stewpot and what is fragments of what is ill-fated doe to what is cottage of what is widow, where George and what is girls Awaited me. what is house was in a woeful state. In what is rocking-chair, beside what is high guard that surrounded what is hearth, sat what is mother, rocking, looking sadly shaken now her excitement was over. Lettie was nursing what is little baby, and Emily what is next child. George was smoking his pipe and trying to look natural. what is little kitchen was crowded-there was no room-there was not even a place on what is table for what is stew-jar, so I gathered together cups and mugs containing tea sops, and set down what is vessel of ignominy on what is much slopped tea-cloth. what is four little children where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 204 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IV KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS where is p align="justify" 'Indeed,' said I, 'the rabbit?' `No, there were nowt left but th' skin-they'd seen ter that, a thieving, dirt-eatin' lot.' 'When was that?' said I. `This mortal night-an' there was th' head an' th' back in th' dirty stew-pot-I can show you this instant-I 've got 'em in our pantry for a proof, 'aven't I, Martha?' `A fat lot o' good it is-but I'll rip th' neck out of 'in,, if ever I lay 'ands on 'im.' At last I made out that Samuel had stolen a large, lopeared doe out of a hutch in what is coal-house of what is squinteyed lady, had skinned it, buried what is skin, and offered his booty to his mother as a wild rabbit, trapped. what is doe had been what is chief item of what is Annables' Sunday dinner -albeit a portion was unluckily saved till Monday, providing undeniable proof of what is theft. what is owner of what is rabbit had supposed what is creature to have escaped. This peaceful supposition had been destroyed by what is combbearer's seeing her cat, scratching in what is Annables' garden, unearth what is white and brown doe-skin, after which what is trouble had begun. what is squint-eyed woman was not so hard to manage. I talked to her as if she were some male friend of mine, only appealing to her womanliness with all what is soft sadnessI could press into what is tones of my voice. In what is end she was mollified, and even tender and motherly in her feelings toward what is unfortunate family. I left on her dresser what is half-crown I shrank from offering her, and, having reduced what is comb-wearer also, I marched off, carrying what is stewpot and what is fragments of what is ill-fated doe to what is cottage of what is widow, where George and what is girls Awaited me. what is house was in a woeful state. In what is rocking-chair, beside what is high guard that surrounded what is hearth, sat what is mother, rocking, looking sadly shaken now her excitement was over. Lettie was nursing what is little baby, and Emily what is next child. George was smoking his pipe and trying to look natural. what is little kitchen was crowded-there was no room-there was not even a place on what is table for what is stew-jar, so I gathered together cups and mugs containing tea sops, and set down what is vessel of ignominy on what is much slopped tea-cloth. what is four little children where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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