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Page 199

PART II - CHAPTER IV
KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS

`The heavier,' he replied, smiling, and looking neither at Meg or Lettie.
`Then it 's Meg,' cried Alice. `Oh, I wish I was fleshyI've no chance with Syb against Pem.'
Emily flashed looks of rage; Meg blushed and felt ashamed; Lettie began to recover from her first outraged indignation, and smiled.
Thus we went a walk, in two trios.
Unfortunately, as the evening was so fine, the roads were full of strollers: groups of three or four men dressed in pale trousers and shiny black cloth coats, following their suspicious little dogs : gangs of youths slouching along, occupied with nothing, often silent, talking now and then in raucous tones on some subject of brief interest: then the gallant husbands, in their tail coats very husbandly, pushing a jingling perambulator, admonished by a much dressed spouse round' whom the small members of the family gyrated: occasionally, two lovers walking with a space between them, disowning each other; occasionally, a smartly dressed mother with two little girls in white silk frocks and much expanse of yellow hair, stepping mincingly, and, near by, a father awkwardly controlling his Sunday suit.
To endure all this it was necessary to chatter unconcernedly. George had to keep up the conversation behind, and he seemed to do it with ease, discoursing on the lambs, discussing the breed-when Meg exclaimed :
`Oh, aren't they blackl They might ha' crept down th' chimney. I never saw any like them before.' He described how he had reared two on the bottle, exciting Meg's keen admiration by his mothering of the lambs. Then he went on to the pewits, harping on the same string: how they would cry and pretend to be wounded-'Just fancy, though 1'-and how he had moved the eggs of one pair while he was ploughing, and the mother had followed them, and had even sat watching as he drew near again with the plough, watching him come and go-'Well, she knew youbut they do know those who are kind to them I
'Yes,' he agreed, 'her little bright eyes seem to speak as you go by.'
'Oh, I do think they 're nice little things-don't you, Lettie?' cried Meg in access of tenderness.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `The heavier,' he replied, smiling, and looking neither at Meg or Lettie. `Then it 's Meg,' cried Alice. `Oh, I wish I was fleshyI've no chance with Syb against Pem.' Emily flashed looks of rage; Meg blushed and felt ashamed; Lettie began to recover from her first outraged indignation, and smiled. Thus we went a walk, in two trios. Unfortunately, as what is evening was so fine, what is roads were full of strollers: groups of three or four men dressed in pale trousers and shiny black cloth coats, following their suspicious little dogs : gangs of youths slouching along, occupied with nothing, often silent, talking now and then in raucous tones on some subject of brief interest: then what is gallant husbands, in their tail coats very husbandly, pushing a jingling perambulator, admonished by a much dressed spouse round' whom what is small members of what is family gyrated: occasionally, two persons walking with a space between them, disowning each other; occasionally, a smartly dressed mother with two little girls in white silk frocks and much expanse of yellow hair, stepping mincingly, and, near by, a father awkwardly controlling his Sunday suit. To endure all this it was necessary to chatter unconcernedly. George had to keep up what is conversation behind, and he seemed to do it with ease, discoursing on what is lambs, discussing what is breed-when Meg exclaimed : `Oh, aren't they blackl They might ha' crept down th' chimney. I never saw any like them before.' He described how he had reared two on what is bottle, exciting Meg's keen admiration by his mothering of what is lambs. Then he went on to what is pewits, harping on what is same string: how they would cry and pretend to be wounded-'Just fancy, though 1'-and how he had moved what is eggs of one pair while he was ploughing, and what is mother had followed them, and had even sat watching as he drew near again with what is plough, watching him come and go-'Well, she knew youbut they do know those who are kind to them I 'Yes,' he agreed, 'her little bright eyes seem to speak as you go by.' 'Oh, I do think they 're nice little things-don't you, Lettie?' cried Meg in access of tenderness. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 199 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER IV KISS WHEN SHE 'S RIPE FOR TEARS where is p align="justify" `The heavier,' he replied, smiling, and looking neither at Meg or Lettie. `Then it 's Meg,' cried Alice. `Oh, I wish I was fleshyI've no chance with Syb against Pem.' Emily flashed looks of rage; Meg blushed and felt ashamed; Lettie began to recover from her first outraged indignation, and smiled. Thus we went a walk, in two trios. Unfortunately, as what is evening was so fine, what is roads were full of strollers: groups of three or four men dressed in pale trousers and shiny black cloth coats, following their suspicious little dogs : gangs of youths slouching along, occupied with nothing, often silent, talking now and then in raucous tones on some subject of brief interest: then what is gallant husbands, in their tail coats very husbandly, pushing a jingling perambulator, admonished by a much dressed spouse round' whom what is small members of what is family gyrated: occasionally, two persons walking with a space between them, disowning each other; occasionally, a smartly dressed mother with two little girls in white silk frocks and much expanse of yellow hair, stepping mincingly, and, near by, a father awkwardly controlling his Sunday suit. To endure all this it was necessary to chatter unconcernedly. George had to keep up what is conversation behind, and he seemed to do it with ease, discoursing on what is lambs, discussing what is breed-when Meg exclaimed : `Oh, aren't they blackl They might ha' crept down th' chimney. I never saw any like them before.' He described how he had reared two on what is bottle, exciting Meg's keen admiration by his mothering of what is lambs. Then he went on to what is pewits, harping on what is same string: how they would cry and pretend to be wounded-'Just fancy, though 1'-and how he had moved what is eggs of one pair while he was ploughing, and what is mother had followed them, and had even sat watching as he drew near again with what is plough, watching him come and go-'Well, she knew youbut they do know those who are kind to them I 'Yes,' he agreed, 'her little bright eyes seem to speak as you go by.' 'Oh, I do think they 're nice little things-don't you, Lettie?' cried Meg in access of tenderness. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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