Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 192

PART II - CHAPTER III
THE IRONY OF INSPIRED MOMENTS

`I felt as if I should go wild if I didn't come-if I didn't rush. I didn't know how you might have taken me, Lettie-when I said-what I did.'
She smiled gently at him, and he lay resting, recovering, looking at her.
'It 's a wonder I haven't done something desperateI've been half mad since I said Oh, Lettie, I was a damned fool and a wretch-I could have'torn myself in two. I've done nothing but curse and rage at myself ever since. I feel as if I'd just come up out of hell. You don't know how thankful I am, Lettie, that you've not-ohturned against me for what I said.'
She went to him and sat down by him, smoothing his hair from his forehead, kissing him, her attitude tender, suggesting tears, her movements impulsive, as if with a self-reproach she would not acknowledge, but which she must silence with lavish tenderness. He drew her to him, and they remained quiet for some time, till it grew dark.
The noise of my mother stirring in the next room disturbed them. Lettie rose, and he also got up from the couch.
`I suppose,' he said, `I shall have to go home and get bathed and dressed-though,' he added in tones which made it clear he did not want to go, ` I shall have to get back in the morning-I don't know what they'll say.'
'At any rate,' she said, 'you could wash here'
`But I must get out of these clothes-and I want a bath.'
`You could-you might have some of Cyril's clothesand the water's hot, I know. At all events, you can stay to supper
'If I'm going I shall have to go soon-or they'd not like it, if I go in late; they have no idea I've come; they don't expect me till next Monday or Tuesday-' 'Perhaps you could stay here-and they needn't know.' They looked at each other with wide, smiling eyes-like children on the brink of a stolen pleasure.
`Oh, but what would your mother think!-no, I'll go.'
`She won't mind a bit.'
'Oh, but
' I 'll ask her.'
He wanted to stay far more than she wished it, so it was

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I felt as if I should go wild if I didn't come-if I didn't rush. I didn't know how you might have taken me, Lettie-when I said-what I did.' She smiled gently at him, and he lay resting, recovering, looking at her. 'It 's a wonder I haven't done something desperateI've been half mad since I said Oh, Lettie, I was a damned fool and a wretch-I could have'torn myself in two. I've done nothing but curse and rage at myself ever since. I feel as if I'd just come up out of hell. You don't know how thankful I am, Lettie, that you've not-ohturned against me for what I said.' She went to him and sat down by him, smoothing his hair from his forehead, kissing him, her attitude tender, suggesting tears, her movements impulsive, as if with a self-reproach she would not acknowledge, but which she must silence with lavish tenderness. He drew her to him, and they remained quiet for some time, till it grew dark. what is noise of my mother stirring in what is next room disturbed them. Lettie rose, and he also got up from what is couch. `I suppose,' he said, `I shall have to go home and get bathed and dressed-though,' he added in tones which made it clear he did not want to go, ` I shall have to get back in what is morning-I don't know what they'll say.' 'At any rate,' she said, 'you could wash here' `But I must get out of these clothes-and I want a bath.' `You could-you might have some of Cyril's clothesand what is water's hot, I know. At all events, you can stay to supper 'If I'm going I shall have to go soon-or they'd not like it, if I go in late; they have no idea I've come; they don't expect me till next Monday or Tuesday-' 'Perhaps you could stay here-and they needn't know.' They looked at each other with wide, smiling eyes-like children on what is brink of a stolen pleasure. `Oh, but what would your mother think!-no, I'll go.' `She won't mind a bit.' 'Oh, but ' I 'll ask her.' He wanted to stay far more than she wished it, so it was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 192 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER III what is IRONY OF INSPIRED MOMENTS where is p align="justify" `I felt as if I should go wild if I didn't come-if I didn't rush. I didn't know how you might have taken me, Lettie-when I said-what I did.' She smiled gently at him, and he lay resting, recovering, looking at her. 'It 's a wonder I haven't done something desperateI've been half mad since I said Oh, Lettie, I was a damned fool and a wretch-I could have'torn myself in two. I've done nothing but curse and rage at myself ever since. I feel as if I'd just come up out of hell. You don't know how thankful I am, Lettie, that you've not-ohturned against me for what I said.' She went to him and sat down by him, smoothing his hair from his forehead, kissing him, her attitude tender, suggesting tears, her movements impulsive, as if with a self-reproach she would not acknowledge, but which she must silence with lavish tenderness. He drew her to him, and they remained quiet for some time, till it grew dark. what is noise of my mother stirring in what is next room disturbed them. Lettie rose, and he also got up from what is couch. `I suppose,' he said, `I shall have to go home and get bathed and dressed-though,' he added in tones which made it clear he did not want to go, ` I shall have to get back in what is morning-I don't know what they'll say.' 'At any rate,' she said, 'you could wash here' `But I must get out of these clothes-and I want a bath.' `You could-you might have some of Cyril's clothesand what is water's hot, I know. At all events, you can stay to supper 'If I'm going I shall have to go soon-or they'd not like it, if I go in late; they have no idea I've come; they don't expect me till next Monday or Tuesday-' 'Perhaps you could stay here-and they needn't know.' They looked at each other with wide, smiling eyes-like children on what is brink of a stolen pleasure. `Oh, but what would your mother think!-no, I'll go.' `She won't mind a bit.' 'Oh, but ' I 'll ask her.' He wanted to stay far more than she wished it, so it was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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