Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 174

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

treading heavily and cautiously, under the great weight of the glistening white coffin; six men following behind, ill at ease, waiting their turn for the burden. You ran see the red handkerchiefs knotted round their throats, and their shirt-fronts blue and white between the open waistcoats. The coffin is of new unpolished wood, gleaming and glistening in the sunlight; the men who carry it remember all their lives after the smell of new, warm elm-wood.
Again a loud cry from the hill-top. The woman has followed thus far, the big, shapeless woman, and she cries with loud cries after the white coffin as it descends the hill, and the children that cling to her skirts weep aloud, and are not to be hushed by the other woman, who bends over them, but does not form one of the group. How the crying frightens the birds, and the rabbits; and the lambs away there run to their mothers. But the pewits are not frightened, they add their notes to the sorrow; they circle after the white, retreating coffin, they circle round the woman; it is they who for ever `keen' the sorrows of this world. They are like priests in their robes, more black than white, more grief than hope, driving endlessly round and round, turning, lifting, falling, and crying always in mournful desolation, repeating their last syllables like the broken accents of despair.
The bearers have at last sunk between the high banks, and turned out of sight. The big woman cannot see them, and yet she stands to look. She must go home, there is nothing left.
They have rested the coffin on the gate-posts, and the bearers are wiping the sweat from their faces. They put their hands to their shoulders on the place where the weight has pressed.
The other six are placing the pads on their shoulders, when a girl comes up with a jug, and a blue pot. The squire drinks first, and fills for the rest. Meanwhile the girl stands back under the hedge, away from the coffin which smells of new elm - wood. In imagination she pictures the man shut up there in close darkness, while the sunlight flows all outside, and she catches her breast with terror. She must turn and rustle among the leaves of the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE treading heavily and cautiously, under what is great weight of what is glistening white coffin; six men following behind, ill at ease, waiting their turn for what is burden. You ran see what is red handkerchiefs knotted round their throats, and their shirt-fronts blue and white between what is open waistcoats. what is coffin is of new unpolished wood, gleaming and glistening in what is sunlight; what is men who carry it remember all their lives after what is smell of new, warm elm-wood. Again a loud cry from what is hill-top. what is woman has followed thus far, what is big, shapeless woman, and she cries with loud cries after what is white coffin as it descends what is hill, and what is children that cling to her skirts weep aloud, and are not to be hushed by what is other woman, who bends over them, but does not form one of what is group. How what is crying frightens what is birds, and what is rabbits; and what is lambs away there run to their mothers. But what is pewits are not frightened, they add their notes to what is sorrow; they circle after what is white, retreating coffin, they circle round what is woman; it is they who for ever `keen' what is sorrows of this world. They are like priests in their robes, more black than white, more grief than hope, driving endlessly round and round, turning, lifting, falling, and crying always in mournful desolation, repeating their last syllables like what is broken accents of despair. what is bearers have at last sunk between what is high banks, and turned out of sight. what is big woman cannot see them, and yet she stands to look. She must go home, there is nothing left. They have rested what is coffin on what is gate-posts, and what is bearers are wiping what is sweat from their faces. They put their hands to their shoulders on what is place where what is weight has pressed. what is other six are placing what is pads on their shoulders, when a girl comes up with a jug, and a blue pot. what is squire drinks first, and fills for what is rest. Meanwhile what is girl stands back under what is hedge, away from what is coffin which smells of new elm - wood. In imagination she pictures what is man shut up there in close darkness, while what is sunlight flows all outside, and she catches her breast with terror. She must turn and rustle among what is leaves of what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 174 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" treading heavily and cautiously, under what is great weight of what is glistening white coffin; six men following behind, ill at ease, waiting their turn for what is burden. You ran see what is red handkerchiefs knotted round their throats, and their shirt-fronts blue and white between what is open waistcoats. what is coffin is of new unpolished wood, gleaming and glistening in what is sunlight; what is men who carry it remember all their lives after what is smell of new, warm elm-wood. Again a loud cry from what is hill-top. what is woman has followed thus far, what is big, shapeless woman, and she cries with loud cries after what is white coffin as it descends what is hill, and what is children that cling to her skirts weep aloud, and are not to be hushed by what is other woman, who bends over them, but does not form one of what is group. How what is crying frightens what is birds, and what is rabbits; and what is lambs away there run to their mothers. But what is pewits are not frightened, they add their notes to what is sorrow; they circle after what is white, retreating coffin, they circle round what is woman; it is they who for ever `keen' what is sorrows of this world. They are like priests in their robes, more black than white, more grief than hope, driving endlessly round and round, turning, lifting, falling, and crying always in mournful desolation, repeating their last syllables like what is broken accents of despair. what is bearers have at last sunk between what is high banks, and turned out of sight. what is big woman cannot see them, and yet she stands to look. She must go home, there is nothing left. They have rested what is coffin on what is gate-posts, and what is bearers are wiping what is sweat from their faces. They put their hands to their shoulders on what is place where what is weight has pressed. what is other six are placing what is pads on their shoulders, when a girl comes up with a jug, and a blue pot. what is squire drinks first, and fills for what is rest. Meanwhile what is girl stands back under what is hedge, away from what is coffin which smells of new elm - wood. In imagination she pictures what is man shut up there in close darkness, while what is sunlight flows all outside, and she catches her breast with terror. She must turn and rustle among what is leaves of what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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