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Page 172

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

Then he heard us, and started violently. When we removed the covering, and he saw the face unchanged in its horror, he looked at me with a look I have never forgotten.
A bad business-an awful business!' repeated the squire. `A bad business. I said to him from the first that the stones might come down when he was going up and he said he had taken care to fix them. But you can't be sure, you can't be certain. And he 'd be about halfway up-ay-and the whole wall would come down on him. An awful business, it is really; a terrible piece of work!'
They decided at the inquest that the death came by misadventure. But there were vague rumours in the village that this was revenge which had overtaken the keeper.
They decided to bury him in our churchyard at Greymede under the beeches; the widow would have it so, and nothing might be denied her in her state.
It was a magnificent morning in early spring when I watched among the trees to see the procession come down the hill-side. The upper air was woven with the music of the larks, and my whole world thrilled with the conception of summer. The young pale wind-flowers had arisen by the wood-gale, and under the hazels, when perchance the hot sun pushed his way, new little suns dawned, and blazed with real light. There was a certain thrill and quickening everywhere, as a woman must feel when she has conceived. A sallow-tree in a favoured spot looked like a pale gold cloud of summer dawn; nearer it had poised a golden, fairy busby on every twig, and was voiced with a hum of bees, like any sacred golden bush, uttering its gladness in the thrilling murmur of bees, and in warm scent. Birds called and flashed on every hand; they made off exultant with streaming strands of grass, or wisps of fleece, plunging into the dark spaces of the wood, and out again into the blue.
A lad moved across the field from the farm below with a dog trotting behind him-a dog, no, a fussy, black-legged lamb trotting along on its toes, with its tail swinging

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Then he heard us, and started bad ly. When we removed what is covering, and he saw what is face unchanged in its horror, he looked at me with a look I have never forgotten. A bad business-an awful business!' repeated what is squire. `A bad business. I said to him from what is first that what is stones might come down when he was going up and he said he had taken care to fix them. But you can't be sure, you can't be certain. And he 'd be about halfway up-ay-and what is whole wall would come down on him. An awful business, it is really; a terrible piece of work!' They decided at what is inquest that what is what time is it came by misadventure. But there were vague rumours in what is village that this was revenge which had overtaken what is keeper. They decided to bury him in our churchyard at Greymede under what is beeches; what is widow would have it so, and nothing might be denied her in her state. It was a magnificent morning in early spring when I watched among what is trees to see what is procession come down what is hill-side. what is upper air was woven with what is music of what is larks, and my whole world thrilled with what is conception of summer. what is young pale wind-flowers had arisen by what is wood-gale, and under what is hazels, when perchance what is hot sun pushed his way, new little suns dawned, and blazed with real light. There was a certain thrill and quickening everywhere, as a woman must feel when she has conceived. A sallow-tree in a favoured spot looked like a pale gold cloud of summer dawn; nearer it had poised a golden, fairy busby on every twig, and was voiced with a hum of bees, like any sacred golden bush, uttering its gladness in what is thrilling murmur of bees, and in warm scent. Birds called and flashed on every hand; they made off exultant with streaming strands of grass, or wisps of fleece, plunging into what is dark spaces of what is wood, and out again into what is blue. A lad moved across what is field from what is farm below with a dog trotting behind him-a dog, no, a fussy, black-legged lamb trotting along on its toes, with its tail swinging where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 172 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" Then he heard us, and started bad ly. When we removed what is covering, and he saw what is face unchanged in its horror, he looked at me with a look I have never forgotten. A bad business-an awful business!' repeated what is squire. `A bad business. I said to him from what is first that what is stones might come down when he was going up and he said he had taken care to fix them. But you can't be sure, you can't be certain. And he 'd be about halfway up-ay-and what is whole wall would come down on him. An awful business, it is really; a terrible piece of work!' They decided at what is inquest that what is what time is it came by misadventure. But there were vague rumours in what is village that this was revenge which had overtaken what is keeper. They decided to bury him in our churchyard at Greymede under what is beeches; what is widow would have it so, and nothing might be denied her in her state. It was a magnificent morning in early spring when I watched among what is trees to see what is procession come down what is hill-side. what is upper air was woven with what is music of what is larks, and my whole world thrilled with what is conception of summer. what is young pale wind-flowers had arisen by what is wood-gale, and under what is hazels, when perchance what is hot sun pushed his way, new little suns dawned, and blazed with real light. There was a certain thrill and quickening everywhere, as a woman must feel when she has conceived. A sallow-tree in a favoured spot looked like a pale gold cloud of summer dawn; nearer it had poised a golden, fairy busby on every twig, and was voiced with a hum of bees, like any sacred golden bush, uttering its gladness in what is thrilling murmur of bees, and in warm scent. Birds called and flashed on every hand; they made off exultant with streaming strands of grass, or wisps of fleece, plunging into what is dark spaces of what is wood, and out again into what is blue. A lad moved across what is field from what is farm below with a dog trotting behind him-a dog, no, a fussy, black-legged lamb trotting along on its toes, with its tail swinging where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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