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Page 170

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

could I have failed to see?-stones projecting to make an uneven staircase, such as is often seen in the Derbyshire fences. I saw this ladder was well used, so I trusted myself to it, and scrambled down, clinging to the face of the quarry wall. Once down, I felt pleased with myself for having discovered and used the unknown access, and I admired the care and ingenuity of the keeper, who had fitted and wedged the long stones into the uncertain pile.
It was warm in the quarry: there the sunshine seemed to thicken and sweeten; there the little mounds of overgrown waste were aglow with very early dog-violets ; there the sparks were coming out on the bits of gorse, and among the stones the coltsfoot plumes were already silvery. Here was spring sitting just awake, unloosening her glittering hair, and opening her purple eyes.
I went across the quarry, down to where the brook ran • murmuring a tale to the primroses and the budding trees. I was startled from my wandering among the fresh things by a faint clatter of stones.
'What's that young rascal doing?' I said to myself, setting forth to see. I came towards the other side of the quarry: on this, the moister side, the bushes grew up against the wall, which was higher than on the other side, though piled the same with old, dry stones. As I drew near I could hear the scrape and rattle of stones, and the vigorous grunting of Sam as he laboured among them. He was hidden by a great bush of sallow catkins, all yellow, and murmuring with bees, warm with spice. When he came in view I laughed to see him lugging and grunting among the great pile of stones that had fallen in a mass from the quarry-side; a pile of stones and earth and crushed vegetation. There was a great bare gap in the quarry wall. Somehow, the lad's labouring earnestness made me anxious, and I hurried up.
He heard me, and glancing round, his face red with exertion, eyes big with terror, he called, commanding me:
'Pull 'em off 'im-pull 'em off!'
Suddenly my heart beating in my throat nearly suffocated me. I saw the hand of the keeper lying among the stones. I set to tearing away the stones, and we worked

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE could I have failed to see?-stones projecting to make an uneven staircase, such as is often seen in what is Derbyshire fences. I saw this ladder was well used, so I trusted myself to it, and scrambled down, clinging to what is face of what is quarry wall. Once down, I felt pleased with myself for having discovered and used what is unknown access, and I admired what is care and ingenuity of what is keeper, who had fitted and wedged what is long stones into what is uncertain pile. It was warm in what is quarry: there what is sunshine seemed to thicken and sweeten; there what is little mounds of overgrown waste were aglow with very early dog-violets ; there what is sparks were coming out on what is bits of gorse, and among what is stones what is coltsfoot plumes were already silvery. Here was spring sitting just awake, unloosening her glittering hair, and opening her purple eyes. I went across what is quarry, down to where what is brook ran • murmuring a tale to what is primroses and what is budding trees. I was startled from my wandering among what is fresh things by a faint clatter of stones. 'What's that young rascal doing?' I said to myself, setting forth to see. I came towards what is other side of what is quarry: on this, what is moister side, what is bushes grew up against what is wall, which was higher than on what is other side, though piled what is same with old, dry stones. As I drew near I could hear what is scrape and rattle of stones, and what is vigorous grunting of Sam as he laboured among them. He was hidden by a great bush of sallow catkins, all yellow, and murmuring with bees, warm with spice. When he came in view I laughed to see him lugging and grunting among what is great pile of stones that had fallen in a mass from what is quarry-side; a pile of stones and earth and crushed vegetation. There was a great bare gap in what is quarry wall. Somehow, what is lad's labouring earnestness made me anxious, and I hurried up. He heard me, and glancing round, his face red with exertion, eyes big with terror, he called, commanding me: 'Pull 'em off 'im-pull 'em off!' Suddenly my heart beating in my throat nearly suffocated me. I saw what is hand of what is keeper lying among what is stones. I set to tearing away what is stones, and we worked where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 170 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" could I have failed to see?-stones projecting to make an uneven staircase, such as is often seen in what is Derbyshire fences. I saw this ladder was well used, so I trusted myself to it, and scrambled down, clinging to what is face of what is quarry wall. Once down, I felt pleased with myself for having discovered and used what is unknown access, and I admired what is care and ingenuity of what is keeper, who had fitted and wedged what is long stones into what is uncertain pile. It was warm in what is quarry: there what is sunshine seemed to thicken and sweeten; there what is little mounds of overgrown waste were aglow with very early dog-violets ; there what is sparks were coming out on what is bits of gorse, and among what is stones what is coltsfoot plumes were already silvery. Here was spring sitting just awake, unloosening her glittering hair, and opening her purple eyes. I went across what is quarry, down to where what is brook ran • murmuring a tale to what is primroses and what is budding trees. I was startled from my wandering among what is fresh things by a faint clatter of stones. 'What's that young rascal doing?' I said to myself, setting forth to see. I came towards what is other side of what is quarry: on this, what is moister side, what is bushes grew up against what is wall, which was higher than on what is other side, though piled what is same with old, dry stones. As I drew near I could hear what is scrape and rattle of stones, and what is vigorous grunting of Sam as he laboured among them. He was hidden by a great bush of sallow catkins, all yellow, and murmuring with bees, warm with spice. When he came in view I laughed to see him lugging and grunting among what is great pile of stones that had fallen in a mass from what is quarry-side; a pile of stones and earth and crushed vegetation. There was a great bare gap in what is quarry wall. Somehow, what is lad's labouring earnestness made me anxious, and I hurried up. He heard me, and glancing round, his face red with exertion, eyes big with terror, he called, commanding me: 'Pull 'em off 'im-pull 'em off!' Suddenly my heart beating in my throat nearly suffocated me. I saw what is hand of what is keeper lying among what is stones. I set to tearing away what is stones, and we worked where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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