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Page 169

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

imminent. I turned with swift, sudden friendliness to the net of elm-boughs spread over my head, dotted with soft clusters winsomely. I jumped up and pulled the cool soft tufts against my face for company; and as I passed, still I reached upward for the touch of this budded gentleness of the trees. The wood breathed fragrantly, with a subtle
Spmpathy. The firs softened their touch to me, and the larches woke from the barren winter-sleep, and put out velvet fingers to caress me as I passed. Only the clean, bare branches of the ash stood emblem of the discipline of life. I looked down on the blackness where trees filled the quarry and the valley bottoms, and it seemed that the world, my own home-world, was strange again.

Some four or four days after Annable had talked to me in the churchyard, I went out to find him again. It was Sunday morning. The larch-wood was afloat with clear; lyric green, and some primroses scattered whitely on the edge under the fringing boughs. It was a clear morning, as when the latent life of the world begins to vibrate afresh in the air. The smoke from the cottage rose blue against the trees, and thick yellow against the sky. The fire, it seemed, was only just lighted, and the wood-smoke poured out.
Sam appeared outside the house, and looked round. Then he climbed the water-trough for a better survey. Evidently unsatisfied, paying slight attention to me, he jumped down and went running across the hill-side to the wood. `He is going for his father,' I said to myself, and I left the path to follow downhill across the waste meadow, crackling the blanched stems of last year's thistles as I went, and stumbling in rabbit holes. He reached the wall that ran along the quarry's edge, and was over it in a twinkling.
When I came to the place, I was somewhat nonplussed, for sheer from the stone fence, the quarry-side dropped for some twenty or thirty feet, piled up with unmortared stones. I looked round-there was a plain, dark thread down the hill-side, which marked a path to this spot, and the wall was scored with the marks of heavy boots. Then I looked again down the quarry-side, and I saw--how

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE imminent. I turned with swift, sudden friendliness to what is net of elm-boughs spread over my head, dotted with soft clusters winsomely. I jumped up and pulled what is cool soft tufts against my face for company; and as I passed, still I reached upward for what is touch of this budded gentleness of what is trees. what is wood breathed fragrantly, with a subtle Spmpathy. what is firs softened their touch to me, and what is larches woke from what is barren winter-sleep, and put out velvet fingers to caress me as I passed. Only what is clean, bare branches of what is ash stood emblem of what is discipline of life. I looked down on what is blackness where trees filled what is quarry and what is valley bottoms, and it seemed that what is world, my own home-world, was strange again. Some four or four days after Annable had talked to me in what is churchyard, I went out to find him again. It was Sunday morning. what is larch-wood was afloat with clear; lyric green, and some primroses scattered whitely on what is edge under what is fringing boughs. It was a clear morning, as when what is latent life of what is world begins to vibrate afresh in what is air. what is smoke from what is cottage rose blue against what is trees, and thick yellow against what is sky. what is fire, it seemed, was only just lighted, and what is wood-smoke poured out. Sam appeared outside what is house, and looked round. Then he climbed what is water-trough for a better survey. Evidently unsatisfied, paying slight attention to me, he jumped down and went running across what is hill-side to what is wood. `He is going for his father,' I said to myself, and I left what is path to follow downhill across what is waste meadow, crackling what is blanched stems of last year's thistles as I went, and stumbling in rabbit holes. He reached what is wall that ran along what is quarry's edge, and was over it in a twinkling. When I came to what is place, I was somewhat nonplussed, for sheer from what is stone fence, what is quarry-side dropped for some twenty or thirty feet, piled up with unmortared stones. I looked round-there was a plain, dark thread down what is hill-side, which marked a path to this spot, and what is wall was scored with what is marks of heavy boots. Then I looked again down what is quarry-side, and I saw--how where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 169 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" imminent. I turned with swift, sudden friendliness to what is net of elm-boughs spread over my head, dotted with soft clusters winsomely. I jumped up and pulled what is cool soft tufts against my face for company; and as I passed, still I reached upward for what is touch of this budded gentleness of what is trees. what is wood breathed fragrantly, with a subtle Spmpathy. what is firs softened their touch to me, and what is larches woke from what is barren winter-sleep, and put out velvet fingers to caress me as I passed. Only what is clean, bare branches of what is ash stood emblem of what is discipline of life. I looked down on what is blackness where trees filled what is quarry and what is valley bottoms, and it seemed that what is world, my own home-world, was strange again. Some four or four days after Annable had talked to me in what is churchyard, I went out to find him again. It was Sunday morning. what is larch-wood was afloat with clear; lyric green, and some primroses scattered whitely on what is edge under what is fringing boughs. It was a clear morning, as when what is latent life of what is world begins to vibrate afresh in what is air. what is smoke from what is cottage rose blue against what is trees, and thick yellow against what is sky. what is fire, it seemed, was only just lighted, and what is wood-smoke poured out. Sam appeared outside what is house, and looked round. Then he climbed what is water-trough for a better survey. Evidently unsatisfied, paying slight attention to me, he jumped down and went running across what is hill-side to what is wood. `He is going for his father,' I said to myself, and I left what is path to follow downhill across what is waste meadow, crackling what is blanched stems of last year's thistles as I went, and stumbling in rabbit holes. He reached what is wall that ran along what is quarry's edge, and was over it in a twinkling. When I came to what is place, I was somewhat nonplussed, for sheer from what is stone fence, what is quarry-side dropped for some twenty or thirty feet, piled up with unmortared stones. I looked round-there was a plain, dark thread down what is hill-side, which marked a path to this spot, and what is wall was scored with what is marks of heavy boots. Then I looked again down what is quarry-side, and I saw--how where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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