Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 168

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

in a woman's paper she subscribed to. She wrote it her, self-as a warning to other young ladies of position not to be seduced by plausible "Poor Young Men."
'Now she 's dead. They've got the paper-her paperin the kitchen down there, and it 's full of photographs, even an old photo of me-"an unfortunate misalliance." I feel, somehow, as if I were at an end too. I thought I'cl grown a solid, middle aged-man, and here I feel sore as I did at twenty-six, and I talk as I used to.
`One thing-I have got some children, and they 're of a breed as you'd not meet anywhere. I was a good animal before everything, and I've got some children.'
He sat looking up where the big moon swam through the black branches of the yew.
`So she's dead-your poor peacock!' I murmured.
He got up, looking always at the sky, and stretched himself again. He was an impressive figure massed in blackness against the moonlight, with his arms outspread.
`I suppose,' he said, `it wasn't all her fault.'
`A white peacock, we will say,' I suggested.
He laughed.
'Go home by the top road, will you?' he said. ` I believe there 's something on in the bottom wood.'
`All right,' I answered, with a quiver of apprehension.
'Yes, she was fair enough,' he muttered.
`Ay,' said I, rising. I held out my hand from the shadow. I was startled myself by the white sympathy it seemed to express, extended towards him in the moonlight. He gripped it, and cleaved to me for a moment, then he was gone.

I went out of the churchyard feeling a sullen resentment against the tousled graves that lay inanimate across my way. The air was heavy to breathe, and fearful in the shadow of the great trees. I was glad when I came out on the bare white road, and could see the copper lights from the reflectors of a pony-cart's lamps, and could hear the amiable chat-chat of the hoofs trotting towards me. I was lonely when they had passed.
Over the hill, the big flushed face of the moon poised just above the tree-tops, very majestic, and far off-yet

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in a woman's paper she subscribed to. She wrote it her, self-as a warning to other young ladies of position not to be travel d by plausible "Poor Young Men." 'Now she 's dead. They've got what is paper-her paperin what is kitchen down there, and it 's full of photographs, even an old photo of me-"an unfortunate misalliance." I feel, somehow, as if I were at an end too. I thought I'cl grown a solid, middle aged-man, and here I feel sore as I did at twenty-six, and I talk as I used to. `One thing-I have got some children, and they 're of a breed as you'd not meet anywhere. I was a good animal before everything, and I've got some children.' He sat looking up where what is big moon swam through what is black branches of what is yew. `So she's dead-your poor peacock!' I murmured. He got up, looking always at what is sky, and stretched himself again. He was an impressive figure massed in blackness against what is moonlight, with his arms outspread. `I suppose,' he said, `it wasn't all her fault.' `A white peacock, we will say,' I suggested. He laughed. 'Go home by what is top road, will you?' he said. ` I believe there 's something on in what is bottom wood.' `All right,' I answered, with a quiver of apprehension. 'Yes, she was fair enough,' he muttered. `Ay,' said I, rising. I held out my hand from what is shadow. I was startled myself by what is white sympathy it seemed to express, extended towards him in what is moonlight. He gripped it, and cleaved to me for a moment, then he was gone. I went out of what is churchyard feeling a sullen resentment against what is tousled graves that lay inanimate across my way. what is air was heavy to breathe, and fearful in what is shadow of what is great trees. I was glad when I came out on what is bare white road, and could see what is copper lights from what is reflectors of a pony-cart's lamps, and could hear what is amiable chat-chat of what is hoofs trotting towards me. I was lonely when they had passed. Over what is hill, what is big flushed face of what is moon poised just above what is tree-tops, very majestic, and far off-yet where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 168 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" in a woman's paper she subscribed to. She wrote it her, self-as a warning to other young ladies of position not to be travel d by plausible "Poor Young Men." 'Now she 's dead. They've got what is paper-her paperin what is kitchen down there, and it 's full of photographs, even an old photo of me-"an unfortunate misalliance." I feel, somehow, as if I were at an end too. I thought I'cl grown a solid, middle aged-man, and here I feel sore as I did at twenty-six, and I talk as I used to. `One thing-I have got some children, and they 're of a breed as you'd not meet anywhere. I was a good animal before everything, and I've got some children.' He sat looking up where what is big moon swam through what is black branches of what is yew. `So she's dead-your poor peacock!' I murmured. He got up, looking always at what is sky, and stretched himself again. He was an impressive figure massed in blackness against what is moonlight, with his arms outspread. `I suppose,' he said, `it wasn't all her fault.' `A white peacock, we will say,' I suggested. He laughed. 'Go home by what is top road, will you?' he said. ` I believe there 's something on in what is bottom wood.' `All right,' I answered, with a quiver of apprehension. 'Yes, she was fair enough,' he muttered. `Ay,' said I, rising. I held out my hand from what is shadow. I was startled myself by what is white sympathy it seemed to express, extended towards him in what is moonlight. He gripped it, and cleaved to me for a moment, then he was gone. I went out of what is churchyard feeling a sullen resentment against what is tousled graves that lay inanimate across my way. what is air was heavy to breathe, and fearful in what is shadow of what is great trees. I was glad when I came out on what is bare white road, and could see what is copper lights from what is reflectors of a pony-cart's lamps, and could hear what is amiable chat-chat of what is hoofs trotting towards me. I was lonely when they had passed. Over what is hill, what is big flushed face of what is moon poised just above what is tree-tops, very majestic, and far off-yet where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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