Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 164

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

vault overhead I tossed pieces of plaster until one hit the bell, and it `tonged' out its faint remonstrance. There was a rustle of many birds like spirits. I sounded the bell again, and dark forms moved with cries of alarm overhead, and something fell heavily. I shivered in the dark, evil-smelling place, and hurried to get out of doors. I clutched my hands with relief and pleasure when I saw the sky above me quivering with the last crystal lights, and the lowest red of sunset behind the yew-boles. I drank the fresh air, that sparkled with the sound of the blackbirds and thrushes whistling their strong bright notes.
I strayed round to where the headstones, from their eminence leaned to look on the Hall below, where great windows shone yellow light on to the flagged courtyard, and the little fish-pool. A stone staircase descended from the graveyard to the court, between stone balustrades whose pock-marked grey columns still swelled gracefully and with dignity, encrusted with lichens. The staircase was filled with ivy and rambling roses-impassable. Ferns were unrolling round the big square halting place, half-way down where the stairs turned.
A peacock, startled from the back premises of the Hall, came flapping up the terraces to the churchyard. Then a heavy footstep crossed the flags. It was the keeper. I whistled the whistle he knew, and he broke his way through the vicious rose-boughs up the stairs. The peacock flapped beyond me, on to the neck of an old bowed angel, rough and dark, an angel which had long ceased sorrowing for the lost Lucy, and had died also. The bird bent its voluptuous neck and peered about. Then it lifted up its head and yelled. The sound tore the dark sanctuary of twilight. The old grey grass seemed to stir, and I could fancy the smothered primroses and violets beneath it waking and gasping for fear.
The keeper looked at me and smiled. He nodded his head towards the peacock, saying:
`Hark at that damned thing!'
Again the bird lifted its crested head and gave a cry, at the same time turning awkwardly on its ugly legs, so that it showed us the full wealth of its tail glimmering like a stream of coloured stars over the sunken face of the angel.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE vault overhead I tossed pieces of plaster until one hit what is bell, and it `tonged' out its faint remonstrance. There was a rustle of many birds like spirits. I sounded what is bell again, and dark forms moved with cries of alarm overhead, and something fell heavily. I shivered in what is dark, evil-smelling place, and hurried to get out of doors. I clutched my hands with relief and pleasure when I saw what is sky above me quivering with what is last crystal lights, and what is lowest red of sunset behind what is yew-boles. I drank what is fresh air, that sparkled with what is sound of what is blackbirds and thrushes whistling their strong bright notes. I strayed round to where what is headstones, from their eminence leaned to look on what is Hall below, where great windows shone yellow light on to what is flagged courtyard, and what is little fish-pool. A stone staircase descended from what is graveyard to what is court, between stone balustrades whose pock-marked grey columns still swelled gracefully and with dignity, encrusted with lichens. what is staircase was filled with ivy and rambling roses-impassable. Ferns were unrolling round what is big square halting place, half-way down where what is stairs turned. A peacock, startled from what is back premises of what is Hall, came flapping up what is terraces to what is churchyard. Then a heavy footstep crossed what is flags. It was what is keeper. I whistled what is whistle he knew, and he broke his way through what is vicious rose-boughs up what is stairs. what is peacock flapped beyond me, on to what is neck of an old bowed angel, rough and dark, an angel which had long ceased sorrowing for what is lost Lucy, and had died also. what is bird bent its voluptuous neck and peered about. Then it lifted up its head and yelled. what is sound tore what is dark sanctuary of twilight. what is old grey grass seemed to stir, and I could fancy what is smothered primroses and violets beneath it waking and gasping for fear. what is keeper looked at me and smiled. He nodded his head towards what is peacock, saying: `Hark at that damned thing!' Again what is bird lifted its crested head and gave a cry, at what is same time turning awkwardly on its ugly legs, so that it showed us what is full wealth of its tail glimmering like a stream of coloured stars over what is sunken face of what is angel. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" vault overhead I tossed pieces of plaster until one hit what is bell, and it `tonged' out its faint remonstrance. There was a rustle of many birds like spirits. I sounded what is bell again, and dark forms moved with cries of alarm overhead, and something fell heavily. I shivered in what is dark, evil-smelling place, and hurried to get out of doors. I clutched my hands with relief and pleasure when I saw what is sky above me quivering with what is last crystal lights, and what is lowest red of sunset behind what is yew-boles. I drank what is fresh air, that sparkled with what is sound of what is blackbirds and thrushes whistling their strong bright notes. I strayed round to where what is headstones, from their eminence leaned to look on what is Hall below, where great windows shone yellow light on to what is flagged courtyard, and what is little fish-pool. A stone staircase descended from what is graveyard to what is court, between stone balustrades whose pock-marked grey columns still swelled gracefully and with dignity, encrusted with lichens. what is staircase was filled with ivy and rambling roses-impassable. Ferns were unrolling round what is big square halting place, half-way down where what is stairs turned. A peacock, startled from what is back premises of what is Hall, came flapping up what is terraces to what is churchyard. Then a heavy footstep crossed what is flags. It was what is keeper. I whistled what is whistle he knew, and he broke his way through what is vicious rose-boughs up what is stairs. what is peacock flapped beyond me, on to what is neck of an old bowed angel, rough and dark, an angel which had long ceased sorrowing for what is lost Lucy, and had died also. what is bird bent its voluptuous neck and peered about. Then it lifted up its head and yelled. what is sound tore what is dark sanctuary of twilight. what is old grey grass seemed to stir, and I could fancy what is smothered primroses and violets beneath it waking and gasping for fear. what is keeper looked at me and smiled. He nodded his head towards what is peacock, saying: `Hark at that damned thing!' Again what is bird lifted its crested head and gave a cry, at what is same time turning awkwardly on its ugly legs, so that it showed us what is full wealth of its tail glimmering like a stream of coloured stars over what is sunken face of what is angel. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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