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Page 163

PART II - CHAPTER II
A SHADOW IN SPRING

maggots at work in a dead rabbit. That led us to a discussion of life. He was a thorough materialist-he scorned religion and all mysticism. He spent his days sleeping, putting together a gun, or doing some amateur forestry, cutting down timber, splitting it in logs for use in the Hall, and planting young trees. When he thought, he reflected on the decay of mankind-the decline of the human race into folly and weakness and rottenness. 'Be a good animal; true to your animal instinct,' was his motto. With all this, he was fundamentally very unhappy -and he made me also wretched. It was this power to communicate his unhappiness that made me somewhat dear to him, I think. He treated me as an affectionate father treats a delicate son; I noticed he liked to put his hand on my shoulder or my knee as we talked; yet withal, he asked me questions, and saved his thoughts to tell me, and believed in my knowledge like any acolyte.
I went up to the quarry woods one evening in early April, taking a look for Annable. I could not find him, however, in the wood. So I left the wild-lands, and went along by the old red wall of the kitchen garden, along the main road as far as the mouldering church which stands high on a bank by the roadside, just where the trees tunnel the darkness, and the gloom of the highway startles the travellers at noon. Great trees growing on the banks suddenly fold over everything at this point in the swinging road, and in the obscurity rots the Hall church, black and melancholy above the shrinking head of the traveller.
The grassy path to the churchyard was still clogged with decayed leaves. The church is abandoned. As I drew near an owl floated softly out of the black tower. Grass overgrew the threshold. I pushed open the door, grinding back a heap of fallen plaster and rubbish, and entered the place. In the twilight the pews were leaning in ghostly disorder, the prayer-books dragged from their ledges, scattered on the floor in the dust and rubble, torn by mice and birds. Birds scuffled in the darkness of the roof. I looked up. In the upward well of the tower I could see a bell hanging. I stooped and picked up a piece of plaster from the ragged confusion of feathers, and broken nests, and remnants of dead birds. Up into the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE maggots at work in a dead rabbit. That led us to a discussion of life. He was a thorough materialist-he scorned religion and all mysticism. He spent his days sleeping, putting together a gun, or doing some amateur forestry, cutting down timber, splitting it in logs for use in what is Hall, and planting young trees. When he thought, he reflected on what is decay of mankind-the decline of what is human race into folly and weakness and rottenness. 'Be a good animal; true to your animal instinct,' was his motto. With all this, he was fundamentally very unhappy -and he made me also wretched. It was this power to communicate his unhappiness that made me somewhat dear to him, I think. He treated me as an affectionate father treats a delicate son; I noticed he liked to put his hand on my shoulder or my knee as we talked; yet withal, he asked me questions, and saved his thoughts to tell me, and believed in my knowledge like any acolyte. I went up to what is quarry woods one evening in early April, taking a look for Annable. I could not find him, however, in what is wood. So I left what is wild-lands, and went along by what is old red wall of what is kitchen garden, along what is main road as far as what is mouldering church which stands high on a bank by what is roadside, just where what is trees tunnel what is darkness, and what is gloom of what is highway startles what is travellers at noon. Great trees growing on what is banks suddenly fold over everything at this point in what is swinging road, and in what is obscurity rots what is Hall church, black and melancholy above what is shrinking head of what is traveller. what is grassy path to what is churchyard was still clogged with decayed leaves. what is church is abandoned. As I drew near an owl floated softly out of what is black tower. Grass overgrew what is threshold. I pushed open what is door, grinding back a heap of fallen plaster and rubbish, and entered what is place. In what is twilight what is pews were leaning in ghostly disorder, what is prayer-books dragged from their ledges, scattered on what is floor in what is dust and rubble, torn by mice and birds. Birds scuffled in what is darkness of what is roof. I looked up. In what is upward well of what is tower I could see a bell hanging. I stooped and picked up a piece of plaster from what is ragged confusion of feathers, and broken nests, and remnants of dead birds. Up into what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER II A SHADOW IN SPRING where is p align="justify" maggots at work in a dead rabbit. That led us to a discussion of life. He was a thorough materialist-he scorned religion and all mysticism. He spent his days sleeping, putting together a gun, or doing some amateur forestry, cutting down timber, splitting it in logs for use in what is Hall, and planting young trees. When he thought, he reflected on what is decay of mankind-the decline of what is human race into folly and weakness and rottenness. 'Be a good animal; true to your animal instinct,' was his motto. With all this, he was fundamentally very unhappy -and he made me also wretched. It was this power to communicate his unhappiness that made me somewhat dear to him, I think. He treated me as an affectionate father treats a delicate son; I noticed he liked to put his hand on my shoulder or my knee as we talked; yet withal, he asked me questions, and saved his thoughts to tell me, and believed in my knowledge like any acolyte. I went up to what is quarry woods one evening in early April, taking a look for Annable. I could not find him, however, in what is wood. So I left what is wild-lands, and went along by what is old red wall of what is kitchen garden, along what is main road as far as what is mouldering church which stands high on a bank by what is roadside, just where what is trees tunnel what is darkness, and what is gloom of what is highway startles what is travellers at noon. Great trees growing on what is banks suddenly fold over everything at this point in what is swinging road, and in what is obscurity rots what is Hall church, black and melancholy above what is shrinking head of what is traveller. what is grassy path to what is churchyard was still clogged with decayed leaves. what is church is abandoned. As I drew near an owl floated softly out of what is black tower. Grass overgrew what is threshold. I pushed open what is door, grinding back a heap of fallen plaster and rubbish, and entered what is place. In what is twilight what is pews were leaning in ghostly disorder, what is prayer-books dragged from their ledges, scattered on what is floor in what is dust and rubble, torn by mice and birds. Birds scuffled in what is darkness of what is roof. I looked up. In what is upward well of what is tower I could see a bell hanging. I stooped and picked up a piece of plaster from what is ragged confusion of feathers, and broken nests, and remnants of dead birds. Up into what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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