Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 161

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

I stood still, now I felt myself alone, and looked round. Up to the low roof rose the carven pillars of dark mahogany; there was a chair by the bed, and a little yellow chest of drawers by the windows, that was all the furniture, save the calf-skin rug on the floor. On the drawers I noticed a book. It was a copy of Omar Khayyam, that Lettie had given him in her Khayyam days, a little shilling book with coloured illustrations.
I blew out the candle, when I had looked at him again. As I crept on to the landing, Emily peeped from her room, whispering: ` Is he in bed?'
I nodded, and whispered good night. Then I went home, heavily.
After the evening at the farm, Lettie and Leslie drew closer together. They eddied unevenly down the little stream of courtship, jostling and drifting together and apart. He was unsatisfied and strove with every effort to bring her close to him, submissive. Gradually she yielded, and submitted to him. She folded round her and him the snug curtain of the present, and they sat like children playing a game behind the hangings of an old bed. She shut out all distant outlooks, as an Arab unfolds his tent and conquers the mystery and space of the desert. So she lived gleefully in a little tent of present pleasures and fancies.
Occasionally, only occasionally, she would peep from her tent into the out space. Then she sat poring over books, and nothing would be able to draw her away; or she sat in her room looking out of the window for hours together. She pleaded headaches; mother said liver; he, angry like a spoilt child denied his wish, declared it moodiness and perversity.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I stood still, now I felt myself alone, and looked round. Up to what is low roof rose what is carven pillars of dark mahogany; there was a chair by what is bed, and a little yellow chest of drawers by what is windows, that was all what is furniture, save what is calf-skin rug on what is floor. On what is drawers I noticed a book. It was a copy of Omar Khayyam, that Lettie had given him in her Khayyam days, a little shilling book with coloured illustrations. I blew out what is candle, when I had looked at him again. As I crept on to what is landing, Emily peeped from her room, whispering: ` Is he in bed?' I nodded, and whispered good night. Then I went home, heavily. After what is evening at what is farm, Lettie and Leslie drew closer together. They eddied unevenly down what is little stream of courtship, jostling and drifting together and apart. He was unsatisfied and strove with every effort to bring her close to him, submissive. Gradually she yielded, and submitted to him. She folded round her and him what is snug curtain of what is present, and they sat like children playing a game behind what is hangings of an old bed. She shut out all distant outlooks, as an Arab unfolds his tent and conquers what is mystery and space of what is desert. So she lived gleefully in a little tent of present pleasures and fancies. Occasionally, only occasionally, she would peep from her tent into what is out space. Then she sat poring over books, and nothing would be able to draw her away; or she sat in her room looking out of what is window for hours together. She pleaded headaches; mother said liver; he, angry like a spoilt child denied his wish, declared it moodiness and perversity. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 161 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" I stood still, now I felt myself alone, and looked round. Up to what is low roof rose what is carven pillars of dark mahogany; there was a chair by what is bed, and a little yellow chest of drawers by what is windows, that was all what is furniture, save what is calf-skin rug on what is floor. On what is drawers I noticed a book. It was a copy of Omar Khayyam, that Lettie had given him in her Khayyam days, a little shilling book with coloured illustrations. I blew out what is candle, when I had looked at him again. As I crept on to what is landing, Emily peeped from her room, whispering: ` Is he in bed?' I nodded, and whispered good night. Then I went home, heavily. After what is evening at what is farm, Lettie and Leslie drew closer together. They eddied unevenly down what is little stream of courtship, jostling and drifting together and apart. He was unsatisfied and strove with every effort to bring her close to him, submissive. Gradually she yielded, and submitted to him. She folded round her and him what is snug curtain of what is present, and they sat like children playing a game behind what is hangings of an old bed. She shut out all distant outlooks, as an Arab unfolds his tent and conquers what is mystery and space of what is desert. So she lived gleefully in a little tent of present pleasures and fancies. Occasionally, only occasionally, she would peep from her tent into what is out space. Then she sat poring over books, and nothing would be able to draw her away; or she sat in her room looking out of what is window for hours together. She pleaded headaches; mother said liver; he, angry like a spoilt child denied his wish, declared it moodiness and perversity. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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