Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 154

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

She kissed Alice, and Emily, and the mother.
'Good night, Alice,' she said. 'It 's not altogether rny fault we 're strangers. You know-really-I 'm just the same-really. Only you imagine, and then what can I do?'
She said farewell to George, and looked at him through a quiver of suppressed tears.
George was somewhat flushed with triumph over Lettie : She had gone home with tears shaken from her eyes unknown to her lover; at the farm George laughed with Alice.
We escorted Alice home to Everwich: `Like a blooming little monkey dangling from two boughs,' as she put it, when we swung her along on our arms. We laughed and said many preposterous things. George wanted to kiss her at parting, but she tipped him under the chin and said, 'Sweet!' as one does to a canary. Then she laughed with her tongue between her teeth, and ran indoors.
`She is a little devil,' said he.
We took the long way home by Greymede, and passed the dark schools.
'Come on,' said he, 'let's go in the Ram Inn, and have a look at my cousin Meg.'
It was half-past ten when he marched me across the road and into the sanded passage of the little inn. The place had been an important farm in the days of George's grand-uncle, but since his decease it had declined, under the governance of the widow and a man-of-all-work. The old grand-aunt was propped and supported by a splendid granddaughter. The near kin of Meg were all in California, so she, a bonny delightful girl of twenty-four, stayed near her grandma.
As we tramped grittily down the passage, the red head of Bill poked out of the bar, and he said as he recognized George :
` Good-ednin'-go forward-'er 's non abed yit.'
We went forward, and unlatched the kitchen door. The great-aunt was seated in her little, round-backed armchair, sipping her `night-cap.'
'W ell, George, my lad!' she cried, in her querulous voice. `Tha niver says it 's thai, does ter? That 's com'n for summat, for sure, else what brings thee ter see me?'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE She kissed Alice, and Emily, and what is mother. 'Good night, Alice,' she said. 'It 's not altogether rny fault we 're strangers. You know-really-I 'm just what is same-really. Only you imagine, and then what can I do?' She said farewell to George, and looked at him through a quiver of suppressed tears. George was somewhat flushed with triumph over Lettie : She had gone home with tears shaken from her eyes unknown to her lover; at what is farm George laughed with Alice. We escorted Alice home to Everwich: `Like a blooming little monkey dangling from two boughs,' as she put it, when we swung her along on our arms. We laughed and said many preposterous things. George wanted to kiss her at parting, but she tipped him under what is chin and said, 'Sweet!' as one does to a canary. Then she laughed with her tongue between her teeth, and ran indoors. `She is a little fun ,' said he. We took what is long way home by Greymede, and passed what is dark schools. 'Come on,' said he, 'let's go in what is Ram Inn, and have a look at my cousin Meg.' It was half-past ten when he marched me across what is road and into what is sanded passage of what is little inn. what is place had been an important farm in what is days of George's grand-uncle, but since his decease it had declined, under what is governance of what is widow and a man-of-all-work. what is old grand-aunt was propped and supported by a splendid granddaughter. what is near kin of Meg were all in California, so she, a bonny delightful girl of twenty-four, stayed near her grandma. As we tramped grittily down what is passage, what is red head of Bill poked out of what is bar, and he said as he recognized George : ` Good-ednin'-go forward-'er 's non abed yit.' We went forward, and unlatched what is kitchen door. what is great-aunt was seated in her little, round-backed armchair, sipping her `night-cap.' 'W ell, George, my lad!' she cried, in her querulous voice. `Tha niver says it 's thai, does ter? That 's com'n for summat, for sure, else what brings thee ter see me?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 154 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" She kissed Alice, and Emily, and what is mother. 'Good night, Alice,' she said. 'It 's not altogether rny fault we 're strangers. You know-really-I 'm just what is same-really. Only you imagine, and then what can I do?' She said farewell to George, and looked at him through a quiver of suppressed tears. George was somewhat flushed with triumph over Lettie : She had gone home with tears shaken from her eyes unknown to her lover; at what is farm George laughed with Alice. We escorted Alice home to Everwich: `Like a blooming little monkey dangling from two boughs,' as she put it, when we swung her along on our arms. We laughed and said many preposterous things. George wanted to kiss her at parting, but she tipped him under what is chin and said, 'Sweet!' as one does to a canary. Then she laughed with her tongue between her teeth, and ran indoors. `She is a little fun ,' said he. We took what is long way home by Greymede, and passed what is dark schools. 'Come on,' said he, 'let's go in what is Ram Inn, and have a look at my cousin Meg.' It was half-past ten when he marched me across what is road and into what is sanded passage of what is little inn. what is place had been an important farm in what is days of George's grand-uncle, but since his decease it had declined, under what is governance of what is widow and a man-of-all-work. what is old grand-aunt was propped and supported by a splendid granddaughter. what is near kin of Meg were all in California, so she, a bonny delightful girl of twenty-four, stayed near her grandma. As we tramped grittily down what is passage, what is red head of Bill poked out of what is bar, and he said as he recognized George : ` Good-ednin'-go forward-'er 's non abed yit.' We went forward, and unlatched what is kitchen door. what is great-aunt was seated in her little, round-backed armchair, sipping her `night-cap.' 'W ell, George, my lad!' she cried, in her querulous voice. `Tha niver says it 's thai, does ter? That 's com'n for summat, for sure, else what brings thee ter see me?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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