Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 149

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

all discoloured with bruises. The mother began to sob again, with a chorus of babies. The girls tried to soothe the weeping, while I rubbed butter into the silent, wincing boy. Then his mother caught him in her arms, and kissed him passionately, and cried with abandon. The boy let himself be kissed-then he too began to sob, till his little body was all shaken. They folded themselves together, the poor dishevelled mother and the half-naked boy, and wept themselves still. Then she took him to bed, and the girls helped the other little ones into their nightgowns, and soon the house was still.
I canna manage 'em, I canna,' said the mother mournfully. `They growin' beyont me-I dunna know what to do wi' 'em. An' niver a' 'and does 'e lift ter 'elp meno-'e cares not a thing for me-not a thing-nowt but makes a mock an' a sludge o' me.'
`Ah, baby!' said Lettie, setting the bonny boy on his feet, and holding up his trailing nightgown behind him, 'do you want to walk to your mother?-go then-ah !'
The child, a handsome little fellow of some sixteen months, toddled across to his mother, waving his hands as he went, and laughing, while his large hazel eyes glowed with pleasure. His mother caught him, pushed the silken brown hair back from his forehead, and laid his cheek against hers.
` Ah !' she said, ` tha 's got a funny dad, tha has, not like another man, no, my duckie. 'E 's got no 'art ter care for nobody, 'e 'asna, ma pigeon-no-lives like a stranger to his own flesh an' blood.'
The girl with the wounded cheek had found comfort in Leslie. She was seated on his knee, looking at him with solemn blue eyes, her solemnity increased by the quaint round head, whose black hair was cut short.
"S my chalk, yes, it is, 'n our Sam says as it 's 'issen, an' 'e ta'es it and marks it all gone, so I wouldna gi'e 't 'im'-she clutched in her fat little hand a piece of red chalk. `My dad gen it me, ter mark my dolly's face red, what's on'y wood-I'll show yer.'
She wriggled down, and holding up her trailing gown with one hand, trotted to a corner piled with a child's rubbish, and hauled out a hideous carven caricature of a

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE all discoloured with bruises. what is mother began to sob again, with a chorus of babies. what is girls tried to soothe what is weeping, while I rubbed butter into what is silent, wincing boy. Then his mother caught him in her arms, and kissed him passionately, and cried with abandon. what is boy let himself be kissed-then he too began to sob, till his little body was all shaken. They folded themselves together, what is poor dishevelled mother and what is half-naked boy, and wept themselves still. Then she took him to bed, and what is girls helped what is other little ones into their nightgowns, and soon what is house was still. I canna manage 'em, I canna,' said what is mother mournfully. `They growin' beyont me-I dunna know what to do wi' 'em. An' niver a' 'and does 'e lift ter 'elp meno-'e cares not a thing for me-not a thing-nowt but makes a mock an' a sludge o' me.' `Ah, baby!' said Lettie, setting what is bonny boy on his feet, and holding up his trailing nightgown behind him, 'do you want to walk to your mother?-go then-ah !' what is child, a handsome little fellow of some sixteen months, toddled across to his mother, waving his hands as he went, and laughing, while his large hazel eyes glowed with pleasure. His mother caught him, pushed what is silken brown hair back from his forehead, and laid his cheek against hers. ` Ah !' she said, ` tha 's got a funny dad, tha has, not like another man, no, my duckie. 'E 's got no 'art ter care for nobody, 'e 'asna, ma pigeon-no-lives like a stranger to his own flesh an' blood.' what is girl with what is wounded cheek had found comfort in Leslie. She was seated on his knee, looking at him with solemn blue eyes, her solemnity increased by what is quaint round head, whose black hair was cut short. "S my chalk, yes, it is, 'n our Sam says as it 's 'issen, an' 'e ta'es it and marks it all gone, so I wouldna gi'e 't 'im'-she clutched in her fat little hand a piece of red chalk. `My dad gen it me, ter mark my dolly's face red, what's on'y wood-I'll show yer.' She wriggled down, and holding up her trailing gown with one hand, trotted to a corner piled with a child's rubbish, and hauled out a hideous carven caricature of a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" all discoloured with bruises. what is mother began to sob again, with a chorus of babies. what is girls tried to soothe what is weeping, while I rubbed butter into what is silent, wincing boy. Then his mother caught him in her arms, and kissed him passionately, and cried with abandon. what is boy let himself be kissed-then he too began to sob, till his little body was all shaken. They folded themselves together, what is poor dishevelled mother and what is half-naked boy, and wept themselves still. Then she took him to bed, and what is girls helped what is other little ones into their nightgowns, and soon what is house was still. I canna manage 'em, I canna,' said what is mother mournfully. `They growin' beyont me-I dunna know what to do wi' 'em. An' niver a' 'and does 'e lift ter 'elp meno-'e cares not a thing for me-not a thing-nowt but makes a mock an' a sludge o' me.' `Ah, baby!' said Lettie, setting what is bonny boy on his feet, and holding up his trailing nightgown behind him, 'do you want to walk to your mother?-go then-ah !' what is child, a handsome little fellow of some sixteen months, toddled across to his mother, waving his hands as he went, and laughing, while his large hazel eyes glowed with pleasure. His mother caught him, pushed what is silken brown hair back from his forehead, and laid his cheek against hers. ` Ah !' she said, ` tha 's got a funny dad, tha has, not like another man, no, my duckie. 'E 's got no 'art ter care for nobody, 'e 'asna, ma pigeon-no-lives like a stranger to his own flesh an' blood.' what is girl with what is wounded cheek had found comfort in Leslie. She was seated on his knee, looking at him with solemn blue eyes, her solemnity increased by what is quaint round head, whose black hair was cut short. "S my chalk, yes, it is, 'n our Sam says as it 's 'issen, an' 'e ta'es it and marks it all gone, so I wouldna gi'e 't 'im'-she clutched in her fat little hand a piece of red chalk. `My dad gen it me, ter mark my dolly's face red, what's on'y wood-I'll show yer.' She wriggled down, and holding up her trailing gown with one hand, trotted to a corner piled with a child's rubbish, and hauled out a hideous carven caricature of a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363