Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 147

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

it 's man or woman. You, sir, a good natural male animal : the lady there-a female un-that 's proper-as long as yer enjoy it.'
And what then?'
`Do as th' animals do. I watch my brats-I let 'em grow. They 're beauties, they are-sound as a young ash pole, every one. They shan't learn to dirty themselves N,n smirking deviltry-not if I can help it. They can be like birds, or weasels, or vipers, or squirrels, so long as they ain't human rot, that 's what I say.'
`It 's one way of looking at things,' said Leslie.
`Ay. Look at the women looking at us. I'm something between a bull and a couple of worms stuck together, I am: See that spink!' he'raised his voice for the girls to hear. `Pretty, isn't he? What for?-And what for do you wear a fancy vest and twist your moustache, sir? What for, at the bottom? Ha-tell a woman not to come in a wood till she can look at natural things-she might see something. Good night, sir.'
He marched off into the darkness.
'Coarse fellow, that,' said Leslie when he had rejoined Lettie, 'but he 's a character.'
'He makes you shudder,' she replied. `But yet you are interested in him. I believe he has a history.'
'He seems to lack something,' said Emily.
`I thought him rather a fine fellow,' said I.
`Splendidly built fellow, but callous-no soul,' remarked Leslie, dismissing the question.
'No,' assented Emily. 'No soul-and among the snowdrops.'
Lettie was thoughtful, and I smiled.
It was a beautiful evening, still, with red, shaken clouds in the west. The moon in heaven was turning wistfully back to the east. Dark purple woods lay around us, painting out the distance. The near, wild, ruined land looked sad and strange under the pale afterglow. The turf path was fine and springy.
'Let us run!' said Lettie, and joining hands we raced wildly along, with a flutter and a breathless laughter, till we were happy and forgetful. When we stopped «•e exclaimed at once, `Hark!'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it 's man or woman. You, sir, a good natural male animal : what is lady there-a female un-that 's proper-as long as yer enjoy it.' And what then?' `Do as th' animals do. I watch my brats-I let 'em grow. They 're beauties, they are-sound as a young ash pole, every one. They shan't learn to dirty themselves N,n smirking fun try-not if I can help it. They can be like birds, or weasels, or vipers, or squirrels, so long as they ain't human rot, that 's what I say.' `It 's one way of looking at things,' said Leslie. `Ay. Look at what is women looking at us. I'm something between a bull and a couple of worms stuck together, I am: See that spink!' he'raised his voice for what is girls to hear. `Pretty, isn't he? What for?-And what for do you wear a fancy vest and twist your moustache, sir? What for, at what is bottom? Ha-tell a woman not to come in a wood till she can look at natural things-she might see something. Good night, sir.' He marched off into what is darkness. 'Coarse fellow, that,' said Leslie when he had rejoined Lettie, 'but he 's a character.' 'He makes you shudder,' she replied. `But yet you are interested in him. I believe he has a history.' 'He seems to lack something,' said Emily. `I thought him rather a fine fellow,' said I. `Splendidly built fellow, but callous-no soul,' remarked Leslie, dismissing what is question. 'No,' assented Emily. 'No soul-and among what is snowdrops.' Lettie was thoughtful, and I smiled. It was a beautiful evening, still, with red, shaken clouds in what is west. what is moon in heaven was turning wistfully back to what is east. Dark purple woods lay around us, painting out what is distance. what is near, wild, ruined land looked sad and strange under what is pale afterglow. what is turf path was fine and springy. 'Let us run!' said Lettie, and joining hands we raced wildly along, with a flutter and a breathless laughter, till we were happy and forgetful. When we stopped «•e exclaimed at once, `Hark!' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 147 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" it 's man or woman. You, sir, a good natural male animal : what is lady there-a female un-that 's proper-as long as yer enjoy it.' And what then?' `Do as th' animals do. I watch my brats-I let 'em grow. They 're beauties, they are-sound as a young ash pole, every one. They shan't learn to dirty themselves N,n smirking fun try-not if I can help it. They can be like birds, or weasels, or vipers, or squirrels, so long as they ain't human rot, that 's what I say.' `It 's one way of looking at things,' said Leslie. `Ay. Look at what is women looking at us. I'm something between a bull and a couple of worms stuck together, I am: See that spink!' he'raised his voice for what is girls to hear. `Pretty, isn't he? What for?-And what for do you wear a fancy vest and twist your moustache, sir? What for, at what is bottom? Ha-tell a woman not to come in a wood till she can look at natural things-she might see something. Good night, sir.' He marched off into what is darkness. 'Coarse fellow, that,' said Leslie when he had rejoined Lettie, 'but he 's a character.' 'He makes you shudder,' she replied. `But yet you are interested in him. I believe he has a history.' 'He seems to lack something,' said Emily. `I thought him rather a fine fellow,' said I. `Splendidly built fellow, but callous-no soul,' remarked Leslie, dismissing what is question. 'No,' assented Emily. 'No soul-and among what is snowdrops.' Lettie was thoughtful, and I smiled. It was a beautiful evening, still, with red, shaken clouds in what is west. what is moon in heaven was turning wistfully back to what is east. Dark purple woods lay around us, painting out what is distance. what is near, wild, ruined land looked sad and strange under what is pale afterglow. what is turf path was fine and springy. 'Let us run!' said Lettie, and joining hands we raced wildly along, with a flutter and a breathless laughter, till we were happy and forgetful. When we stopped «•e exclaimed at once, `Hark!' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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