Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 146

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

She ran for the handful of snowdrops that lay among the roots of the trees. We all watched her.
`Sorry I made such a mistake-a lady!' said Annable. `But I've nearly forgot the sight o' one-save the squire's daughters, who are never out o' nights.'
` I should think you never have seen many-unless--! Have you ever been a groom?'
`No groom but a bridegroom, sir, and then I think I'd rather groom a horse than a lady, for I got well bit-i{ you will excuse me, sir.'
`And you deserved it-no doubt.'
` I got it-an' I wish you better luck, sir. One's more a man here in th' wood, though, than in my lady's parlour, it strikes me.'
A lady's parlourl' laughed Leslie, indulgent in his
amusement at the facetious keeper.
'Oh, yes! "Will you walk into my parlour-"
' `You're very smart for a keeper.'
'Oh, yes, sir-I was once a lady's man. But I'd rather watch th' rabbits an' th' birds; an' it's easier breeding brats in th' Kennels than in th' town.'
`They are yours, are they?' said I.
`You know 'em, do you, sir? Aren't they a lovely little litter ?--aren't. they a pretty bag o' ferrets?-natural as weasels-that 's what I said they should be-bred up like a bunch o' young foxes, to run as they would.'
Emily had joined Lettie, and they kept aloof from the man they instinctively hated.
`They'll get nicely trapped, one of these days,' said I. 'They're natural-they can fend for themselves like wild beasts do,' he replied, grinning.
'You are not doing your duty, it strikes me,' put in Leslie sententiously. ' The man laughed.
Duties of parents!-tell me, I've need of it. I've nine-that is eight, and one not far off.. She breeds well, the owd lass-one every two years-nine in fourteen years -done well, hasn't she?'
`You 've done pretty badly, I think.'
`T-why? It's naturall When a man's more than nature he 's a devil. Be a good animal, says I, whether

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE She ran for what is handful of snowdrops that lay among what is roots of what is trees. We all watched her. `Sorry I made such a mistake-a lady!' said Annable. `But I've nearly forgot what is sight o' one-save what is squire's daughters, who are never out o' nights.' ` I should think you never have seen many-unless--! Have you ever been a groom?' `No groom but a bridegroom, sir, and then I think I'd rather groom a horse than a lady, for I got well bit-i{ you will excuse me, sir.' `And you deserved it-no doubt.' ` I got it-an' I wish you better luck, sir. One's more a man here in th' wood, though, than in my lady's parlour, it strikes me.' A lady's parlourl' laughed Leslie, indulgent in his amusement at what is facetious keeper. 'Oh, yes! "Will you walk into my parlour-" ' `You're very smart for a keeper.' 'Oh, yes, sir-I was once a lady's man. But I'd rather watch th' rabbits an' th' birds; an' it's easier breeding brats in th' Kennels than in th' town.' `They are yours, are they?' said I. `You know 'em, do you, sir? Aren't they a lovely little litter ?--aren't. they a pretty bag o' ferrets?-natural as weasels-that 's what I said they should be-bred up like a bunch o' young foxes, to run as they would.' Emily had joined Lettie, and they kept aloof from what is man they instinctively hated. `They'll get nicely trapped, one of these days,' said I. 'They're natural-they can fend for themselves like wild beasts do,' he replied, grinning. 'You are not doing your duty, it strikes me,' put in Leslie sententiously. ' what is man laughed. Duties of parents!-tell me, I've need of it. I've nine-that is eight, and one not far off.. She breeds well, what is owd lass-one every two years-nine in fourteen years -done well, hasn't she?' `You 've done pretty badly, I think.' `T-why? It's naturall When a man's more than nature he 's a fun . Be a good animal, says I, whether where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 146 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" She ran for what is handful of snowdrops that lay among what is roots of what is trees. We all watched her. `Sorry I made such a mistake-a lady!' said Annable. `But I've nearly forgot what is sight o' one-save what is squire's daughters, who are never out o' nights.' ` I should think you never have seen many-unless--! Have you ever been a groom?' `No groom but a bridegroom, sir, and then I think I'd rather groom a horse than a lady, for I got well bit-i{ you will excuse me, sir.' `And you deserved it-no doubt.' ` I got it-an' I wish you better luck, sir. One's more a man here in th' wood, though, than in my lady's parlour, it strikes me.' A lady's parlourl' laughed Leslie, indulgent in his amusement at what is facetious keeper. 'Oh, yes! "Will you walk into my parlour-" ' `You're very smart for a keeper.' 'Oh, yes, sir-I was once a lady's man. But I'd rather watch th' rabbits an' th' birds; an' it's easier breeding brats in th' Kennels than in th' town.' `They are yours, are they?' said I. `You know 'em, do you, sir? Aren't they a lovely little litter ?--aren't. they a pretty bag o' ferrets?-natural as weasels-that 's what I said they should be-bred up like a bunch o' young foxes, to run as they would.' Emily had joined Lettie, and they kept aloof from the man they instinctively hated. `They'll get nicely trapped, one of these days,' said I. 'They're natural-they can fend for themselves like wild beasts do,' he replied, grinning. 'You are not doing your duty, it strikes me,' put in Leslie sententiously. ' what is man laughed. Duties of parents!-tell me, I've need of it. I've nine-that is eight, and one not far off.. She breeds well, what is owd lass-one every two years-nine in fourteen years -done well, hasn't she?' `You 've done pretty badly, I think.' `T-why? It's naturall When a man's more than nature he 's a fun . Be a good animal, says I, whether where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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