Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 144

PART II - CHAPTER I
STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING

meaning. They do not belong to us, who ravish them* The girls bent among them, touching them with their fingers, and symbolizing the yearning which I felt. Folded in the twilight, these conquered flowerets are sad like forlorn little friends of dryads.
'What do they mean, do you think?' said Lettie in a low voice, as her white fingers touched the flowers, and her black furs fell on them.
`There are not so many this year,' said Leslie.
`They remind me of mistletoe, which is never ours, though we wear it,' said Emily to me.
'What do you think they say-what do they make you think, Cyril?' Lettie repeated.
` I don't know. Emily says they belong to some old wild lost religion. They were the symbol of tears, perhaps, to some strange-hearted Druid folk before us.'
'More than tears,' said Lettie. `More than tears, they are so still. Something out of an old religion, that we have lost. They make me feel afraid.'
'What should you have to fear?' asked Leslie.
'If I knew I shouldn't fear,' she answered. 'Look at all the snowdrops'-they hung in dim, strange flecks among the dusky leaves-'look at them--closed up, retreating, powerless. They belong to some knowledge we have lost, that I have lost and that I need. I feel afraid. They seem like something in fate. Do you think, Cyril, we can lose things off the earth-like mastodons, and those old monstrosities-but things that matter-wisdom?'
'It is against my creed,' said I.
`I believe I have lost something,' said she.
`Come,' said Leslie, `don't trouble with fancies. Come with me to the bottom of this cup, and see how strange it will be, with the sky marked with branches like a filigree lid.'
She rose and followed him down the steep side of the pit, crying: 'Ah, you are treading on the flowers.'
`No,' said he, `I am being very careful.'
They sat down together on a fallen tree at the bottom. She leaned forward, her fingers wandering white among the shadowed grey spaces of leaves, plucking, as if it were a rite, flowers here and there. He could not see her face.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE meaning. They do not belong to us, who ravish them* what is girls bent among them, touching them with their fingers, and symbolizing what is yearning which I felt. Folded in what is twilight, these conquered flowerets are sad like forlorn little friends of dryads. 'What do they mean, do you think?' said Lettie in a low voice, as her white fingers touched what is flowers, and her black furs fell on them. `There are not so many this year,' said Leslie. `They remind me of mistletoe, which is never ours, though we wear it,' said Emily to me. 'What do you think they say-what do they make you think, Cyril?' Lettie repeated. ` I don't know. Emily says they belong to some old wild lost religion. They were what is symbol of tears, perhaps, to some strange-hearted Druid folk before us.' 'More than tears,' said Lettie. `More than tears, they are so still. Something out of an old religion, that we have lost. They make me feel afraid.' 'What should you have to fear?' asked Leslie. 'If I knew I shouldn't fear,' she answered. 'Look at all what is snowdrops'-they hung in dim, strange flecks among what is dusky leaves-'look at them--closed up, retreating, powerless. They belong to some knowledge we have lost, that I have lost and that I need. I feel afraid. They seem like something in fate. Do you think, Cyril, we can lose things off what is earth-like mastodons, and those old monstrosities-but things that matter-wisdom?' 'It is against my creed,' said I. `I believe I have lost something,' said she. `Come,' said Leslie, `don't trouble with fancies. Come with me to what is bottom of this cup, and see how strange it will be, with what is sky marked with branches like a filigree lid.' She rose and followed him down what is steep side of what is pit, crying: 'Ah, you are treading on what is flowers.' `No,' said he, `I am being very careful.' They sat down together on a fallen tree at what is bottom. She leaned forward, her fingers wandering white among what is shadowed grey spaces of leaves, plucking, as if it were a rite, flowers here and there. He could not see her face. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is strong PART II - CHAPTER I STRANGE BLOSSOMS AND STRANGE NEW BUDDING where is p align="justify" meaning. They do not belong to us, who ravish them* what is girls bent among them, touching them with their fingers, and symbolizing what is yearning which I felt. Folded in what is twilight, these conquered flowerets are sad like forlorn little friends of dryads. 'What do they mean, do you think?' said Lettie in a low voice, as her white fingers touched what is flowers, and her black furs fell on them. `There are not so many this year,' said Leslie. `They remind me of mistletoe, which is never ours, though we wear it,' said Emily to me. 'What do you think they say-what do they make you think, Cyril?' Lettie repeated. ` I don't know. Emily says they belong to some old wild lost religion. They were what is symbol of tears, perhaps, to some strange-hearted Druid folk before us.' 'More than tears,' said Lettie. `More than tears, they are so still. Something out of an old religion, that we have lost. They make me feel afraid.' 'What should you have to fear?' asked Leslie. 'If I knew I shouldn't fear,' she answered. 'Look at all what is snowdrops'-they hung in dim, strange flecks among what is dusky leaves-'look at them--closed up, retreating, powerless. They belong to some knowledge we have lost, that I have lost and that I need. I feel afraid. They seem like something in fate. Do you think, Cyril, we can lose things off what is earth-like mastodons, and those old monstrosities-but things that matter-wisdom?' 'It is against my creed,' said I. `I believe I have lost something,' said she. `Come,' said Leslie, `don't trouble with fancies. Come with me to what is bottom of this cup, and see how strange it will be, with what is sky marked with branches like a filigree lid.' She rose and followed him down what is steep side of what is pit, crying: 'Ah, you are treading on what is flowers.' `No,' said he, `I am being very careful.' They sat down together on a fallen tree at what is bottom. She leaned forward, her fingers wandering white among what is shadowed grey spaces of leaves, plucking, as if it were a rite, flowers here and there. He could not see her face. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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