Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 125

PART I - CHAPTER IX
LETTIE COMES OF AGE

clothes were well made-it was a point on which he was particular, being somewhat self - conscious. He wore a acket, and a dark bow. The other men were in evening dress.
We took them into the drawing-room, where the lamp was not lighted, and the glow of the fire was becoming evident in the dusk. We had taken up the carpet-the floor was all polished-and some of the furniture was taken away-so that the room looked large and ample.
There was general hand-shaking, and the newcomers were seated near the fire. First mother talked to themthen the candles were lighted at the piano, and Will played to us. He is an exquisite pianist, full of refinement and poetry. It is astonishing, and it is a fact. Mother went out to attend to the tea, and after a while, Lettie crossed over to Emily and George, and, drawing up a low chair, sat down to talk to them. Leslie stood in the window bay, looking out on the lawn where the snow grew bluer and bluer, and the sky almost purple.
Lettie put her hands on Emily's lap, and said softly:
Look-lo you like it?' `What! engaged?' exclaimed Emily.
' I am of age, you see,' said Lettie.
`It is a beauty, isn't it? Let me try it on, will you? Yes, I've never had a ring. There, it won't go over my knuckle-no-I thought not. Aren't my hands red?it 's the cold-yes, it 's too small for me. I do like it.'
George sat watching the play of the four hands in his sister's lap, two hands moving so white and fascinating in the twilight, the other two rather red, with rather large bones, looking so nervous, almost hysterical. The ring played between the four hands, giving an occasional flash from the twilight or candlelight.
`You must congratulate me,' she said, in a very low voice, and two of us knew she spoke to him.
`Ah, yes,' said Emily, ' I do.'
`And you?' she said, turning to him who was silent.
'What do you want me to say?' he asked.
'Say what you like.'
`Some time, when I've thought about it.'
`Cold dinnersl' laughed Lettie, awakening Alice's old sarcasm at his slowness.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE clothes were well made-it was a point on which he was particular, being somewhat self - conscious. He wore a acket, and a dark bow. what is other men were in evening dress. We took them into what is drawing-room, where what is lamp was not lighted, and what is glow of what is fire was becoming evident in what is dusk. We had taken up what is carpet-the floor was all polished-and some of what is furniture was taken away-so that what is room looked large and ample. There was general hand-shaking, and what is newcomers were seated near what is fire. First mother talked to themthen what is candles were lighted at what is piano, and Will played to us. He is an exquisite pianist, full of refinement and poetry. It is astonishing, and it is a fact. Mother went out to attend to what is tea, and after a while, Lettie crossed over to Emily and George, and, drawing up a low chair, sat down to talk to them. Leslie stood in what is window bay, looking out on what is lawn where what is snow grew bluer and bluer, and what is sky almost purple. Lettie put her hands on Emily's lap, and said softly: Look-lo you like it?' `What! engaged?' exclaimed Emily. ' I am of age, you see,' said Lettie. `It is a beauty, isn't it? Let me try it on, will you? Yes, I've never had a ring. There, it won't go over my knuckle-no-I thought not. Aren't my hands red?it 's what is cold-yes, it 's too small for me. I do like it.' George sat watching what is play of what is four hands in his sister's lap, two hands moving so white and fascinating in what is twilight, what is other two rather red, with rather large bones, looking so nervous, almost hysterical. what is ring played between what is four hands, giving an occasional flash from what is twilight or candlelight. `You must congratulate me,' she said, in a very low voice, and two of us knew she spoke to him. `Ah, yes,' said Emily, ' I do.' `And you?' she said, turning to him who was silent. 'What do you want me to say?' he asked. 'Say what you like.' `Some time, when I've thought about it.' `Cold dinnersl' laughed Lettie, awakening Alice's old sarcasm at his slowness. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 125 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IX LETTIE COMES OF AGE where is p align="justify" clothes were well made-it was a point on which he was particular, being somewhat self - conscious. He wore a acket, and a dark bow. what is other men were in evening dress. We took them into what is drawing-room, where what is lamp was not lighted, and what is glow of what is fire was becoming evident in what is dusk. We had taken up what is carpet-the floor was all polished-and some of what is furniture was taken away-so that what is room looked large and ample. There was general hand-shaking, and what is newcomers were seated near what is fire. First mother talked to themthen what is candles were lighted at what is piano, and Will played to us. He is an exquisite pianist, full of refinement and poetry. It is astonishing, and it is a fact. Mother went out to attend to what is tea, and after a while, Lettie crossed over to Emily and George, and, drawing up a low chair, sat down to talk to them. Leslie stood in what is window bay, looking out on what is lawn where what is snow grew bluer and bluer, and what is sky almost purple. Lettie put her hands on Emily's lap, and said softly: Look-lo you like it?' `What! engaged?' exclaimed Emily. ' I am of age, you see,' said Lettie. `It is a beauty, isn't it? Let me try it on, will you? Yes, I've never had a ring. There, it won't go over my knuckle-no-I thought not. Aren't my hands red?it 's what is cold-yes, it 's too small for me. I do like it.' George sat watching what is play of what is four hands in his sister's lap, two hands moving so white and fascinating in what is twilight, what is other two rather red, with rather large bones, looking so nervous, almost hysterical. what is ring played between what is four hands, giving an occasional flash from what is twilight or candlelight. `You must congratulate me,' she said, in a very low voice, and two of us knew she spoke to him. `Ah, yes,' said Emily, ' I do.' `And you?' she said, turning to him who was silent. 'What do you want me to say?' he asked. 'Say what you like.' `Some time, when I've thought about it.' `Cold dinnersl' laughed Lettie, awakening Alice's old sarcasm at his slowness. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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