Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 111

PART I - CHAPTER VIII
THE RIOT OF CHRISTMAS

the lamp, as we went down the bank to go home. He came as far as the brooks without saying another word. Then he bade us good night. When he had lighted her over the stepping-stones, she did not take my arm as we walked home.
During the next two weeks we were busy preparing for Christmas, ranging the woods for the reddest holly, and pulling the gleaming ivy-bunches from the trees. From the farms around came the cruel yelling of pigs, and in the evening, later, was a scent of pork-pies. Far off on the highway could be heard the sharp trot of ponies hastening with Christmas goods.
There the carts of the hucksters dashed by to the expectant villagers, triumphant with great bunches of light foreign mistletoe, gay with oranges peeping through the boxe§, and scarlet intrusion of apples, and wild confusion . of cold, dead poultry. The hucksters waved their whips triumphantly, the little ponies rattled bravely under the sycamores, towards Christmas.
In the late afternoon of the twenty-fourth, when dust was rising under the hazel brake, I was walking with Lettie. All among the mesh of twigs overhead was tangled a dark red sky. The boles of the trees grew denser-almost blue.
Tramping down the riding we met two boys, fifteen or sixteen years old. Their clothes were largely patched with tough cotton moleskin; scarves were knotted round their throats, and in their pockets rolled tin bottles full of tea, and the white knobs of their knotted snap-bags.
`Why!' said Lettie. `Are you going to work on Christmas eve?'
'It looks like it, don't it?' said the elder.
`And what time will you be coming back?'
`About 'alf past tow.'
`Christmas morning!'
`You 'll be able to look out for the herald angels and the star,' said I
'They'd think we was two dirty little uns,' said the younger lad, laughing.
`They 'll 'appen 'a' done before we get up ter th' top,' added the elder boy-'an' they'll none venture down th' shaft.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the lamp, as we went down what is bank to go home. He came as far as what is brooks without saying another word. Then he bade us good night. When he had lighted her over what is stepping-stones, she did not take my arm as we walked home. During what is next two weeks we were busy preparing for Christmas, ranging what is woods for what is reddest holly, and pulling what is gleaming ivy-bunches from what is trees. From what is farms around came what is cruel yelling of pigs, and in what is evening, later, was a scent of pork-pies. Far off on what is highway could be heard what is sharp trot of ponies hastening with Christmas goods. There what is carts of what is hucksters dashed by to what is expectant villagers, triumphant with great bunches of light foreign mistletoe, gay with oranges peeping through what is boxe§, and scarlet intrusion of apples, and wild confusion . of cold, dead poultry. what is hucksters waved their whips triumphantly, what is little ponies rattled bravely under what is sycamores, towards Christmas. In what is late afternoon of what is twenty-fourth, when dust was rising under what is hazel brake, I was walking with Lettie. All among what is mesh of twigs overhead was tangled a dark red sky. what is boles of what is trees grew denser-almost blue. Tramping down what is riding we met two boys, fifteen or sixteen years old. Their clothes were largely patched with tough cotton moleskin; scarves were knotted round their throats, and in their pockets rolled tin bottles full of tea, and what is white knobs of their knotted snap-bags. `Why!' said Lettie. `Are you going to work on Christmas eve?' 'It looks like it, don't it?' said what is elder. `And what time will you be coming back?' `About 'alf past tow.' `Christmas morning!' `You 'll be able to look out for what is herald angels and what is star,' said I 'They'd think we was two dirty little uns,' said what is younger lad, laughing. `They 'll 'appen 'a' done before we get up ter th' top,' added what is elder boy-'an' they'll none venture down th' shaft.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 111 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER VIII what is RIOT OF CHRISTMAS where is p align="justify" the lamp, as we went down what is bank to go home. He came as far as what is brooks without saying another word. Then he bade us good night. When he had lighted her over what is stepping-stones, she did not take my arm as we walked home. During what is next two weeks we were busy preparing for Christmas, ranging what is woods for what is reddest holly, and pulling what is gleaming ivy-bunches from what is trees. From what is farms around came what is cruel yelling of pigs, and in what is evening, later, was a scent of pork-pies. Far off on what is highway could be heard what is sharp trot of ponies hastening with Christmas goods. There what is carts of what is hucksters dashed by to what is expectant villagers, triumphant with great bunches of light foreign mistletoe, gay with oranges peeping through what is boxe§, and scarlet intrusion of apples, and wild confusion . of cold, dead poultry. what is hucksters waved their whips triumphantly, what is little ponies rattled bravely under what is sycamores, towards Christmas. In what is late afternoon of what is twenty-fourth, when dust was rising under what is hazel brake, I was walking with Lettie. All among what is mesh of twigs overhead was tangled a dark red sky. what is boles of what is trees grew denser-almost blue. Tramping down what is riding we met two boys, fifteen or sixteen years old. Their clothes were largely patched with tough cotton moleskin; scarves were knotted round their throats, and in their pockets rolled tin bottles full of tea, and what is white knobs of their knotted snap-bags. `Why!' said Lettie. `Are you going to work on Christmas eve?' 'It looks like it, don't it?' said what is elder. `And what time will you be coming back?' `About 'alf past tow.' `Christmas morning!' `You 'll be able to look out for what is herald angels and what is star,' said I 'They'd think we was two dirty little uns,' said what is younger lad, laughing. `They 'll 'appen 'a' done before we get up ter th' top,' added what is elder boy-'an' they'll none venture down th' shaft.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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