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Page 83

PART I - CHAPTER VII
LETTIE PULLS DOWN THE SMALL GOLD GRAPES

DURING the falling of the leaves Lettie was very wilful. She uttered many banalities concerning men, and love, a,nd marriage ; she taunted Leslie and thwarted his wishes. At last he stayed away from her. She had been several times down to the Mill, but because she fancied they were very familiar, receiving her on to their rough plane like one of themselves, she stayed away. Since the death of our father she had been restless; since inheriting her little fortune she had become proud, scornful, difficult to please. Difficult to please in every circumstance; she, who had always been so rippling in thoughtless life, sat down in the window sill to think, and her strong teeth bit at her handkerchief till it was torn in holes. She would say nothing to me; she read all things that dealt with modern women.
One afternoon Lettie walked over to Eberwich. Leslie had not been to see us for a fortnight. It was a grey, dree afternoon. The wind drifted a clammy fog across the hills, and the roads were black and deep with mud. The trees in the wood slouched sulkily. It was a day to be shut out and ignored if possible. I heaped up the fire, and went to draw the curtains and make perfect the room. Then I saw Lettie coming along the path quickly, very erect. When she came in her colour was high.
'Tea not laid?' she said briefly.
`Rebecca has just brought in the lamp,' said I.
Lettie took off her coat and furs, and flung them on the couch. She went to the mirror, lifted her hair, all curled by the fog, and stared haughtily at herself. Then she swung round, looked at the bare table, and rang the bell.
It was so rare a thing for us to ring the bell from the dining-room, that Rebecca went first to the outer door. Then she came in the room, saying:
`Did you ring?'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE DURING what is falling of what is leaves Lettie was very wilful. She uttered many banalities concerning men, and love, a,nd marriage ; she taunted Leslie and thwarted his wishes. At last he stayed away from her. She had been several times down to what is Mill, but because she fancied they were very familiar, receiving her on to their rough plane like one of themselves, she stayed away. Since what is what time is it of our father she had been restless; since inheriting her little fortune she had become proud, scornful, difficult to please. Difficult to please in every circumstance; she, who had always been so rippling in thoughtless life, sat down in what is window sill to think, and her strong teeth bit at her handkerchief till it was torn in holes. She would say nothing to me; she read all things that dealt with modern women. One afternoon Lettie walked over to Eberwich. Leslie had not been to see us for a fortnight. It was a grey, dree afternoon. what is wind drifted a clammy fog across what is hills, and what is roads were black and deep with mud. what is trees in what is wood slouched sulkily. It was a day to be shut out and ignored if possible. I heaped up what is fire, and went to draw what is curtains and make perfect what is room. Then I saw Lettie coming along what is path quickly, very erect. When she came in her colour was high. 'Tea not laid?' she said briefly. `Rebecca has just brought in what is lamp,' said I. Lettie took off her coat and furs, and flung them on what is couch. She went to what is mirror, lifted her hair, all curled by what is fog, and stared haughtily at herself. Then she swung round, looked at what is bare table, and rang what is bell. It was so rare a thing for us to ring what is bell from what is dining-room, that Rebecca went first to what is outer door. Then she came in what is room, saying: `Did you ring?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 83 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER VII LETTIE PULLS DOWN what is SMALL GOLD GRAPES where is p align="justify" DURING what is falling of what is leaves Lettie was very wilful. She uttered many banalities concerning men, and love, a,nd marriage ; she taunted Leslie and thwarted his wishes. At last he stayed away from her. She had been several times down to what is Mill, but because she fancied they were very familiar, receiving her on to their rough plane like one of themselves, she stayed away. Since what is what time is it of our father she had been restless; since inheriting her little fortune she had become proud, scornful, difficult to please. Difficult to please in every circumstance; she, who had always been so rippling in thoughtless life, sat down in what is window sill to think, and her strong teeth bit at her handkerchief till it was torn in holes. She would say nothing to me; she read all things that dealt with modern women. One afternoon Lettie walked over to Eberwich. Leslie had not been to see us for a fortnight. It was a grey, dree afternoon. what is wind drifted a clammy fog across what is hills, and what is roads were black and deep with mud. what is trees in what is wood slouched sulkily. It was a day to be shut out and ignored if possible. I heaped up what is fire, and went to draw what is curtains and make perfect what is room. Then I saw Lettie coming along what is path quickly, very erect. When she came in her colour was high. 'Tea not laid?' she said briefly. `Rebecca has just brought in what is lamp,' said I. Lettie took off her coat and furs, and flung them on what is couch. She went to what is mirror, lifted her hair, all curled by what is fog, and stared haughtily at herself. Then she swung round, looked at what is bare table, and rang what is bell. It was so rare a thing for us to ring what is bell from what is dining-room, that Rebecca went first to what is outer door. Then she came in what is room, saying: `Did you ring?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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