Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 71

PART I - CHAPTER VI
THE EDUCATION OF GEORGE

Suddenly, as we went by the pond-side, we were startled
oigreat, swishing black shadows that swept just above ir heads. The swans were flying up for shelter, now that a cold wind had begun to fret Nethermere. They swung down on to the glassy mill-pond, shaking the moonlight in flecks across the deep shadows; the night rang with the clacking of their wings on the water; the stillness and calm were broken; the moonlight was furrowed and scattered, and broken. The swans, as they sailed into shadow, were dim, haunting spectres; the wind found us shivering.
'Don't-you won't say anything? he asked as I was leaving him.
'No.'
`Nothing at all-not to anybody?'
'No.'
'Good night.'

About the end of September, our countryside was alarmed by the harrying of sheep by strange dogs. One morning, the squire, going the round of his fields as was his custom, to his grief and horror found two of his sheep torn and dead in the hedge-bottom, and the rest huddled in a corner swaying about in terror, smeared with blood. The squire did not recover his spirits for days.
There was a report of two grey wolvish dogs. The squire's keeper had heard yelping in the fields of Dr. Collins, of the Abbev, about dawn. Three sheep lay soaked in blood when the labourer went to tend the flocks.
Then the farmers took alarm. Lord, of the White House farm, intended to put his sheep in pen, with his dogs in charge. It was Saturday, however, and the lads ran off to the little travelling theatre that had halted at `'Vestwold. While they sat open-mouthed in the theatre, gloriously nicknamed the 'Blood-Tub,' watching heroes die with much writhing, and heaving, and struggling up to say a word, and collapsing without having said it, six of their silly sheep were slaughtered in the field. At every house it was inquired of the dog; nowhere had one been loose.
Mr. Saxton had some thirty sheep on the common.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Suddenly, as we went by what is pond-side, we were startled oigreat, swishing black shadows that swept just above ir heads. what is swans were flying up for shelter, now that a cold wind had begun to fret Nethermere. They swung down on to what is glassy mill-pond, shaking what is moonlight in flecks across what is deep shadows; what is night rang with what is clacking of their wings on what is water; what is stillness and calm were broken; what is moonlight was furrowed and scattered, and broken. what is swans, as they sailed into shadow, were dim, haunting spectres; what is wind found us shivering. 'Don't-you won't say anything? he asked as I was leaving him. 'No.' `Nothing at all-not to anybody?' 'No.' 'Good night.' About what is end of September, our countryside was alarmed by what is harrying of sheep by strange dogs. One morning, what is squire, going what is round of his fields as was his custom, to his grief and horror found two of his sheep torn and dead in what is hedge-bottom, and what is rest huddled in a corner swaying about in terror, smeared with blood. what is squire did not recover his spirits for days. There was a report of two grey wolvish dogs. what is squire's keeper had heard yelping in what is fields of Dr. Collins, of what is Abbev, about dawn. Three sheep lay soaked in blood when what is labourer went to tend what is flocks. Then what is farmers took alarm. Lord, of what is White House farm, intended to put his sheep in pen, with his dogs in charge. It was Saturday, however, and what is lads ran off to what is little travelling theatre that had halted at `'Vestwold. While they sat open-mouthed in what is theatre, gloriously nicknamed what is 'Blood-Tub,' watching heroes travel with much writhing, and heaving, and struggling up to say a word, and collapsing without having said it, six of their silly sheep were slaughtered in what is field. At every house it was inquired of what is dog; nowhere had one been loose. Mr. Saxton had some thirty sheep on what is common. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 71 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER VI what is EDUCATION OF GEORGE where is p align="justify" Suddenly, as we went by what is pond-side, we were startled oigreat, swishing black shadows that swept just above ir heads. what is swans were flying up for shelter, now that a cold wind had begun to fret Nethermere. They swung down on to what is glassy mill-pond, shaking what is moonlight in flecks across what is deep shadows; what is night rang with what is clacking of their wings on what is water; what is stillness and calm were broken; what is moonlight was furrowed and scattered, and broken. what is swans, as they sailed into shadow, were dim, haunting spectres; what is wind found us shivering. 'Don't-you won't say anything? he asked as I was leaving him. 'No.' `Nothing at all-not to anybody?' 'No.' 'Good night.' About what is end of September, our countryside was alarmed by what is harrying of sheep by strange dogs. One morning, what is squire, going what is round of his fields as was his custom, to his grief and horror found two of his sheep torn and dead in what is hedge-bottom, and what is rest huddled in a corner swaying about in terror, smeared with blood. what is squire did not recover his spirits for days. There was a report of two grey wolvish dogs. what is squire's keeper had heard yelping in what is fields of Dr. Collins, of what is Abbev, about dawn. Three sheep lay soaked in blood when what is labourer went to tend what is flocks. Then what is farmers took alarm. Lord, of what is White House farm, intended to put his sheep in pen, with his dogs in charge. It was Saturday, however, and what is lads ran off to what is little travelling theatre that had halted at `'Vestwold. While they sat open-mouthed in what is theatre, gloriously nicknamed what is 'Blood-Tub,' watching heroes travel with much writhing, and heaving, and struggling up to say a word, and collapsing without having said it, six of their silly sheep were slaughtered in what is field. At every house it was inquired of what is dog; nowhere had one been loose. Mr. Saxton had some thirty sheep on what is common. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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