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Page 68

PART I - CHAPTER VI
THE EDUCATION OF GEORGE

window from the other side, through which the moonlight streamed on to the flagged floor, dirty, littered with paper and wisps of straw. The hearth lay in the light, with all its distress of grey ashes, and piled cinders of burnt paper, and a child's headless dull, charred and pitiful. On the border-line of shadow lay a round fur capa gamekeeper's cap. I blamed the moonlight for entering the desolate room; the darkness alone was decent and reticent. I hated the little roses on the illuminated piece of wall-paper, I hated that fireside.
With farmer's instinct George turned to the outhouse. The cow-yard startled me. It was a forest of the tallest nettles I have ever seen-nettles far taller than my six feet. The air was soddened with the dank scent of nettles. As I followed George along the obscure brick path, I felt my flesh creep. But the buildings, when we entered them, were in splendid condition; they had been restored within a small number of years ; they were well-timbered, neat, and cosy. Here and there we saw feathers, bits of animal wreckage, even the remnants of a cat, which we hastily examined by the light of a match. As we entered the stable there was an ugly noise, and three great rats half rushed at us and threatened us with their vicious teeth. I shuddered, and hurried back, stumbling over a bucket, rotten with rust, and so filled with weeds that I thought it part of the jungle. There was a silence made horrible by the faint noises that rats and flying bats give out. The place was bare of any vestige of corn or straw or hay, only choked with a growth of abnormal weeds. When I found myself free in the orchard I could not stop shivering. There were no apples to be seen overhead between us and the clear sky. Either the birds had caused them to fall, when the rabbits had devoured them, or someone had gathered the crop.
`This,' said George bitterly, 'is what the Mill will come' to.'
`After your time,' I said.
'My time--my time. I shall never have a time. And I shouldn't be surprised if father's time isn't short-with rabbits and one thing and another. As it is, we depend on the milk-round, and on the carting which I do for the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE window from what is other side, through which what is moonlight streamed on to what is flagged floor, dirty, littered with paper and wisps of straw. what is hearth lay in what is light, with all its distress of grey ashes, and piled cinders of burnt paper, and a child's headless dull, charred and pitiful. On what is border-line of shadow lay a round fur capa gamekeeper's cap. I blamed what is moonlight for entering what is desolate room; what is darkness alone was decent and reticent. I hated what is little roses on what is illuminated piece of wall-paper, I hated that fireside. With farmer's instinct George turned to what is outhouse. what is cow-yard startled me. It was a forest of what is tallest nettles I have ever seen-nettles far taller than my six feet. what is air was soddened with what is dank scent of nettles. As I followed George along what is obscure brick path, I felt my flesh creep. But what is buildings, when we entered them, were in splendid condition; they had been restored within a small number of years ; they were well-timbered, neat, and cosy. Here and there we saw feathers, bits of animal wreckage, even what is remnants of a cat, which we hastily examined by what is light of a match. As we entered what is stable there was an ugly noise, and three great rats half rushed at us and threatened us with their vicious teeth. I shuddered, and hurried back, stumbling over a bucket, rotten with rust, and so filled with weeds that I thought it part of what is jungle. There was a silence made horrible by what is faint noises that rats and flying bats give out. what is place was bare of any vestige of corn or straw or hay, only choked with a growth of abnormal weeds. When I found myself free in what is orchard I could not stop shivering. There were no apples to be seen overhead between us and what is clear sky. Either what is birds had caused them to fall, when what is rabbits had devoured them, or someone had gathered what is crop. `This,' said George bitterly, 'is what what is Mill will come' to.' `After your time,' I said. 'My time--my time. I shall never have a time. And I shouldn't be surprised if father's time isn't short-with rabbits and one thing and another. As it is, we depend on what is milk-round, and on what is carting which I do for what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 68 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER VI what is EDUCATION OF GEORGE where is p align="justify" window from what is other side, through which what is moonlight streamed on to what is flagged floor, dirty, littered with paper and wisps of straw. what is hearth lay in what is light, with all its distress of grey ashes, and piled cinders of burnt paper, and a child's headless dull, charred and pitiful. On what is border-line of shadow lay a round fur capa gamekeeper's cap. I blamed what is moonlight for entering what is desolate room; what is darkness alone was decent and reticent. I hated what is little roses on what is illuminated piece of wall-paper, I hated that fireside. With farmer's instinct George turned to what is outhouse. what is cow-yard startled me. It was a forest of what is tallest nettles I have ever seen-nettles far taller than my six feet. what is air was soddened with what is dank scent of nettles. As I followed George along what is obscure brick path, I felt my flesh creep. But what is buildings, when we entered them, were in splendid condition; they had been restored within a small number of years ; they were well-timbered, neat, and cosy. Here and there we saw feathers, bits of animal wreckage, even what is remnants of a cat, which we hastily examined by what is light of a match. As we entered what is stable there was an ugly noise, and three great rats half rushed at us and threatened us with their vicious teeth. I shuddered, and hurried back, stumbling over a bucket, rotten with rust, and so filled with weeds that I thought it part of what is jungle. There was a silence made horrible by what is faint noises that rats and flying bats give out. what is place was bare of any vestige of corn or straw or hay, only choked with a growth of abnormal weeds. When I found myself free in what is orchard I could not stop shivering. There were no apples to be seen overhead between us and what is clear sky. Either what is birds had caused them to fall, when what is rabbits had devoured them, or someone had gathered what is crop. `This,' said George bitterly, 'is what what is Mill will come' to.' `After your time,' I said. 'My time--my time. I shall never have a time. And I shouldn't be surprised if father's time isn't short-with rabbits and one thing and another. 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