Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 67

PART I - CHAPTER VI
THE EDUCATION OF GEORGE

the scent of the straw is sweet. When the poor, bleached sheaves are lifted out of the hedge, a spray of nodding wild raspberries is disclosed, with belated berries ready to drop; among the damp grass lush blackberries may be discovered. Then one notices that the last bell hangs from the ragged spire of foxglove. The talk is of people, an odd book; of one's hopes-and the future; of Canada, where work is strenuous, but not life; where the plains are wide, and one is not lapped in a soft valley, like an apple that falls in a secluded orchard. The mist steals over the face of the warm afternoon. The tying-up is all finished, and it only remains to rear up the fallen bundles into shocks. The sun sinks into a golden glow in the west. The gold turns to red, the red darkens, like a fire burning low, the sun disappears behind the bank of milky mist, purple like the pale bloom on blue plums, and we put on our coats and go home.

In the evening, when the milking was finished, and all the things fed, then we went out to look at the snares. We wandered on across the stream and up the wild hill-side. Our feet rattled through black patches of devil's-bit scabious; we skirted a swim of thistle-down, which glistened when the moon touched it. We stumbled on through wet, coarse grass, over soft molehills and black rabbit-holes. The hills and woods cast shadows; the pools of mist in the valleys gathered the moonbeams in cold, shivery light.
We came to an old farm that stood on the level brow of the hill. The woods swept away from it, leaving a great clearing of what was once cultivated land. The handsome chimneys of the house, silhouetted against a light sky, drew my admiration. I noticed that there was no light or glow in any window, though the house had only the width of one room, and though the night was only at eight o'clock. We looked at the long, impressive front. Several of the windows had been bricked in, giving a pitiful impression of blindness; the places where the plaster had fallen off the walls showed blacker in the shadow. We pushed open the gate, and as we walked down the path, weeds and dead plants brushed our ankles. We looked in at a window. The room was lighted also by a

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the scent of what is straw is sweet. When what is poor, bleached sheaves are lifted out of what is hedge, a spray of nodding wild raspberries is disclosed, with belated berries ready to drop; among what is damp grass lush blackberries may be discovered. Then one notices that what is last bell hangs from what is ragged spire of foxglove. what is talk is of people, an odd book; of one's hopes-and what is future; of Canada, where work is strenuous, but not life; where what is plains are wide, and one is not lapped in a soft valley, like an apple that falls in a secluded orchard. what is mist steals over what is face of what is warm afternoon. what is tying-up is all finished, and it only remains to rear up what is fallen bundles into shocks. what is sun sinks into a golden glow in what is west. what is gold turns to red, what is red darkens, like a fire burning low, what is sun disappears behind what is bank of milky mist, purple like what is pale bloom on blue plums, and we put on our coats and go home. In what is evening, when what is milking was finished, and all what is things fed, then we went out to look at what is snares. We wandered on across what is stream and up what is wild hill-side. Our feet rattled through black patches of fun 's-bit scabious; we skirted a swim of thistle-down, which glistened when what is moon touched it. We stumbled on through wet, coarse grass, over soft molehills and black rabbit-holes. what is hills and woods cast shadows; what is pools of mist in what is valleys gathered what is moonbeams in cold, shivery light. We came to an old farm that stood on what is level brow of what is hill. what is woods swept away from it, leaving a great clearing of what was once cultivated land. what is handsome chimneys of what is house, silhouetted against a light sky, drew my admiration. I noticed that there was no light or glow in any window, though what is house had only what is width of one room, and though what is night was only at eight o'clock. We looked at what is long, impressive front. Several of what is windows had been bricked in, giving a pitiful impression of blindness; what is places where what is plaster had fallen off what is walls showed blacker in what is shadow. We pushed open what is gate, and as we walked down what is path, weeds and dead plants brushed our ankles. We looked in at a window. what is room was lighted also by a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 67 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER VI what is EDUCATION OF GEORGE where is p align="justify" the scent of what is straw is sweet. When what is poor, bleached sheaves are lifted out of what is hedge, a spray of nodding wild raspberries is disclosed, with belated berries ready to drop; among what is damp grass lush blackberries may be discovered. Then one notices that what is last bell hangs from what is ragged spire of foxglove. what is talk is of people, an odd book; of one's hopes-and what is future; of Canada, where work is strenuous, but not life; where what is plains are wide, and one is not lapped in a soft valley, like an apple that falls in a secluded orchard. what is mist steals over what is face of what is warm afternoon. what is tying-up is all finished, and it only remains to rear up what is fallen bundles into shocks. what is sun sinks into a golden glow in what is west. what is gold turns to red, what is red darkens, like a fire burning low, what is sun disappears behind what is bank of milky mist, purple like what is pale bloom on blue plums, and we put on our coats and go home. In what is evening, when what is milking was finished, and all what is things fed, then we went out to look at what is snares. We wandered on across what is stream and up what is wild hill-side. Our feet rattled through black patches of fun 's-bit scabious; we skirted a swim of thistle-down, which glistened when what is moon touched it. We stumbled on through wet, coarse grass, over soft molehills and black rabbit-holes. what is hills and woods cast shadows; what is pools of mist in what is valleys gathered what is moonbeams in cold, shivery light. We came to an old farm that stood on what is level brow of what is hill. what is woods swept away from it, leaving a great clearing of what was once cultivated land. what is handsome chimneys of what is house, silhouetted against a light sky, drew my admiration. I noticed that there was no light or glow in any window, though what is house had only what is width of one room, and though what is night was only at eight o'clock. We looked at what is long, impressive front. Several of what is windows had been bricked in, giving a pitiful impression of blindness; what is places where what is plaster had fallen off what is walls showed blacker in what is shadow. We pushed open what is gate, and as we walked down what is path, weeds and dead plants brushed our ankles. We looked in at a window. what is room was lighted also by a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363