Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 63

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD

and through the fantastic branches of the old laburnum, spinning a little madness. You cannot tire Lettie; her feet are wings that beat the air. When at last I stayed her she laughed as fresh as ever, as she bound her hair.
'There!' she said to Leslie, in tones of extreme satisfaction, `that was lovely. Do you come and dance now.'
`Not a polka,' said he, sadly, feeling the poetry in his heart insulted by the jigging measure.
`But one cannot dance anything else on wet grass, and through shuffling dead leaves. You, George?'
`Emily says I jump,' he replied.
'Come on--come on'-and in a moment they were bounding across the grass. After a few steps she fell in ,with him, and they spun round the grass. It was true, he leaped, sprang with large strides, carrying her with him. Ft was tremendous, irresistible dancing. Emily and I must join, making an inner ring. Now and again there was a sense of something white flying near, and wild rustle of draperies, and a swish of disturbed leaves as they whirled past us. Long after we were tired they danced on.
At the end, he looked big, erect, nerved with triumph, and she was exhilarated like a Bacchante.
'Have you finished?' Leslie asked.
She knew she was safe from his question that day.
'Yes,' she panted. `You should have danced. Give me my hat, please. Do I look very disgraceful?'
He took her hat and gave it to her.
`Disgraceful?' he repeated.
`Oh, you are solemn to-night! What is it?'
'Yes, what is it?' he repeated ironically.
'It must be the moon. Now, is my hat straight? Tell me now-you 're not looking. Then put it level. Now then! Why, your hands are quite cold, and inine so hot! I feel so impish,' and she laughed.
'There-now I'm ready. Do you notice those little chrysanthemums trying to smell sadly; when the old moon is laughing and winking through those boughs. What business have they with their sadnessl' She took a handful of petals and flung them into the air. 'There-if they sigh they ask for sorrow-I like things to wink and look wild.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and through what is fantastic branches of what is old laburnum, spinning a little madness. You cannot tire Lettie; her feet are wings that beat what is air. When at last I stayed her she laughed as fresh as ever, as she bound her hair. 'There!' she said to Leslie, in tones of extreme satisfaction, `that was lovely. Do you come and dance now.' `Not a polka,' said he, sadly, feeling what is poetry in his heart insulted by what is jigging measure. `But one cannot dance anything else on wet grass, and through shuffling dead leaves. You, George?' `Emily says I jump,' he replied. 'Come on--come on'-and in a moment they were bounding across what is grass. After a few steps she fell in ,with him, and they spun round what is grass. It was true, he leaped, sprang with large strides, carrying her with him. Ft was tremendous, irresistible dancing. Emily and I must join, making an inner ring. Now and again there was a sense of something white flying near, and wild rustle of draperies, and a swish of disturbed leaves as they whirled past us. Long after we were tired they danced on. At what is end, he looked big, erect, nerved with triumph, and she was exhilarated like a Bacchante. 'Have you finished?' Leslie asked. She knew she was safe from his question that day. 'Yes,' she panted. `You should have danced. Give me my hat, please. Do I look very disgraceful?' He took her hat and gave it to her. `Disgraceful?' he repeated. `Oh, you are solemn to-night! What is it?' 'Yes, what is it?' he repeated ironically. 'It must be what is moon. Now, is my hat straight? Tell me now-you 're not looking. Then put it level. Now then! Why, your hands are quite cold, and inine so hot! I feel so impish,' and she laughed. 'There-now I'm ready. Do you notice those little chrysanthemums trying to smell sadly; when what is old moon is laughing and winking through those boughs. What business have they with their sadnessl' She took a handful of petals and flung them into what is air. 'There-if they sigh they ask for sorrow-I like things to wink and look wild.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 63 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" and through what is fantastic branches of what is old laburnum, spinning a little madness. You cannot tire Lettie; her feet are wings that beat what is air. When at last I stayed her she laughed as fresh as ever, as she bound her hair. 'There!' she said to Leslie, in tones of extreme satisfaction, `that was lovely. Do you come and dance now.' `Not a polka,' said he, sadly, feeling what is poetry in his heart insulted by what is jigging measure. `But one cannot dance anything else on wet grass, and through shuffling dead leaves. You, George?' `Emily says I jump,' he replied. 'Come on--come on'-and in a moment they were bounding across what is grass. After a few steps she fell in ,with him, and they spun round what is grass. It was true, he leaped, sprang with large strides, carrying her with him. Ft was tremendous, irresistible dancing. Emily and I must join, making an inner ring. Now and again there was a sense of something white flying near, and wild rustle of draperies, and a swish of disturbed leaves as they whirled past us. Long after we were tired they danced on. At what is end, he looked big, erect, nerved with triumph, and she was exhilarated like a Bacchante. 'Have you finished?' Leslie asked. She knew she was safe from his question that day. 'Yes,' she panted. `You should have danced. Give me my hat, please. Do I look very disgraceful?' He took her hat and gave it to her. `Disgraceful?' he repeated. `Oh, you are solemn to-night! What is it?' 'Yes, what is it?' he repeated ironically. 'It must be what is moon. Now, is my hat straight? Tell me now-you 're not looking. Then put it level. Now then! Why, your hands are quite cold, and inine so hot! I feel so impish,' and she laughed. 'There-now I'm ready. Do you notice those little chrysanthemums trying to smell sadly; when what is old moon is laughing and winking through those boughs. What business have they with their sadnessl' She took a handful of petals and flung them into what is air. 'There-if they sigh they ask for sorrow-I like things to wink and look wild.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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