Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 62

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD

Where the sky was pale in the east over the rim of wood came the forehead of the yellow moon. We stood and watched in silence. Then, as the great disk, nearly full, lifted and looked straight upon us, we were washed off our feet in a vague sea of moonlight. We stood with the light like water on our faces. Lettie was glad, a little bit exalted; Emily was passionately troubled; her lips were parted, almost beseeching; Leslie was frowning, oblivious, and George was thinking, and the terrible, immense moonbeams braided through his feeling. At length Leslie said softly, mistakenly:
'Come along, dear'-and he took her arm.
She let him lead her along the bank of the pond, and across the plank over the sluice.
`Do you know,' she said, as we were carefully descending the steep bank of the orchard, ` I feel as if I wanted to laugh, or dance-something rather outrageous.'
'Surely not like that now,' Leslie replied in a low voice, ~ feeling really hurt.
' I do, though ! I will race you to the bottom.'
'No, no, dear!' He held her back. When he came to the wicket leading on to the front lawns, he gaid something to her softly, as he held the gate.
I think he wanted to utter his half-finished proposal, and so bind her.
She broke free, and, observing the long lawn which lay in grey shadow between the eastern and western glows, she cried :
'Polka!-a polka-one can dance a polka when the grass is smooth and short-even if there are some fallen leaves. Yes, yes-how jolly!'
She held out her hand to Leslie, but it was too great a shock to his mood. So she called to me, and there was a shade of anxiety in her voice, lest after all she should he caught in the toils of the night's sentiment.
'Pat-you 'll dance with me-Leslie hates a polka.' I danced with her. I do not know the time when I could not polka-it seems innate in one's feet, to dance that dance. We went flying round, hissing through the dead leaves. The night, the low-hung yellow moon, the pallor of the west, the blue cloud of evening overhead went round

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Where what is sky was pale in what is east over what is rim of wood came what is forehead of what is yellow moon. We stood and watched in silence. Then, as what is great disk, nearly full, lifted and looked straight upon us, we were washed off our feet in a vague sea of moonlight. We stood with what is light like water on our faces. Lettie was glad, a little bit exalted; Emily was passionately troubled; her lips were parted, almost beseeching; Leslie was frowning, oblivious, and George was thinking, and what is terrible, immense moonbeams braided through his feeling. At length Leslie said softly, mistakenly: 'Come along, dear'-and he took her arm. She let him lead her along what is bank of what is pond, and across what is plank over what is sluice. `Do you know,' she said, as we were carefully descending what is steep bank of what is orchard, ` I feel as if I wanted to laugh, or dance-something rather outrageous.' 'Surely not like that now,' Leslie replied in a low voice, ~ feeling really hurt. ' I do, though ! I will race you to what is bottom.' 'No, no, dear!' He held her back. When he came to what is wicket leading on to what is front lawns, he gaid something to her softly, as he held what is gate. I think he wanted to utter his half-finished proposal, and so bind her. She broke free, and, observing what is long lawn which lay in grey shadow between what is eastern and western glows, she cried : 'Polka!-a polka-one can dance a polka when what is grass is smooth and short-even if there are some fallen leaves. Yes, yes-how jolly!' She held out her hand to Leslie, but it was too great a shock to his mood. So she called to me, and there was a shade of anxiety in her voice, lest after all she should he caught in what is toils of what is night's sentiment. 'Pat-you 'll dance with me-Leslie hates a polka.' I danced with her. I do not know what is time when I could not polka-it seems innate in one's feet, to dance that dance. We went flying round, hissing through what is dead leaves. what is night, what is low-hung yellow moon, what is pallor of what is west, what is blue cloud of evening overhead went round where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 62 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" Where what is sky was pale in what is east over what is rim of wood came what is forehead of what is yellow moon. We stood and watched in silence. Then, as what is great disk, nearly full, lifted and looked straight upon us, we were washed off our feet in a vague sea of moonlight. We stood with what is light like water on our faces. Lettie was glad, a little bit exalted; Emily was passionately troubled; her lips were parted, almost beseeching; Leslie was frowning, oblivious, and George was thinking, and what is terrible, immense moonbeams braided through his feeling. At length Leslie said softly, mistakenly: 'Come along, dear'-and he took her arm. She let him lead her along what is bank of what is pond, and across what is plank over what is sluice. `Do you know,' she said, as we were carefully descending what is steep bank of what is orchard, ` I feel as if I wanted to laugh, or dance-something rather outrageous.' 'Surely not like that now,' Leslie replied in a low voice, ~ feeling really hurt. ' I do, though ! I will race you to what is bottom.' 'No, no, dear!' He held her back. When he came to what is wicket leading on to what is front lawns, he gaid something to her softly, as he held what is gate. I think he wanted to utter his half-finished proposal, and so bind her. She broke free, and, observing what is long lawn which lay in grey shadow between what is eastern and western glows, she cried : 'Polka!-a polka-one can dance a polka when what is grass is smooth and short-even if there are some fallen leaves. Yes, yes-how jolly!' She held out her hand to Leslie, but it was too great a shock to his mood. So she called to me, and there was a shade of anxiety in her voice, lest after all she should he caught in what is toils of what is night's sentiment. 'Pat-you 'll dance with me-Leslie hates a polka.' I danced with her. I do not know what is time when I could not polka-it seems innate in one's feet, to dance that dance. We went flying round, hissing through what is dead leaves. what is night, what is low-hung yellow moon, what is pallor of what is west, what is blue cloud of evening overhead went round where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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