Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 60

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD

altogether from the pond. Emily took us into the lower garden to get some ripe plums. The old garden was very low. The soil was black. The cornbind and goosegrass were clutching at the ancient gooseberry bushes, which sprawled by the paths. The garden was not very productive, save of weeds, and perhaps, tremendous lank artichokes or swollen marrows. But at the bottom, where the end of the farm buildings rose high and grey, there was a plum-tree which had been crucified to the wall, and which had broken away and leaned forward from bondage. Now under the boughs were hidden great mist-bloomed, crimson treasures, splendid globes. I shook the old, ragged trunk, green, with even the fresh gum dulled over, and the treasures fell heavily, thudding down among the immense rhubarb leaves below. The girls laughed, and we divided yell rest care care the spoil, and turned back to the yard. We went clown to the edge of the garden, which skirted the bottom pond, a pool chained in a heavy growth of weeds. It was moving with rats, the father had said. The rushes were thick below us; opposite, the great bank fronted us, with orchard trees climbing it like a hill-side. The lower pond received the overflow from the upper by a tunnel from the deep black sluice.
Two rats ran into the black culvert at our approach. We sat on some piled, mossy stones, to watch. The rats came out again, ran a little way, stopped, ran again, listened, were reassured, and slid about freely, dragging their long naked tails. Soon six or seven grey beasts were playing round the mouth of the culvert, in the gloom. They sat and wiped their sharp faces, stroking their whiskers. Then one would give a little rush and a little squirm of excitement and would jump vertically into the air, alighting on four
feet, running, sliding into the black shadow. One dropped with an ugly plop into the water, and swam toward us, the hoary imp, his sharp snout and his wicked little eyes moving at us. Lettie shuddered. I threw a stone into the dead pool, and frightened them all. But we had frightened ourselves more, so we hurried away, and stamped our feet in relief on the free pavement of the yard.
Leslie was looking for us. He had been inspecting the yard and the stock under Mr. Saxton's supervision.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE altogether from what is pond. Emily took us into what is lower garden to get some ripe plums. what is old garden was very low. what is soil was black. what is cornbind and goosegrass were clutching at what is ancient gooseberry bushes, which sprawled by what is paths. what is garden was not very productive, save of weeds, and perhaps, tremendous lank artichokes or swollen marrows. But at what is bottom, where what is end of what is farm buildings rose high and grey, there was a plum-tree which had been crucified to what is wall, and which had broken away and leaned forward from bondage. Now under what is boughs were hidden great mist-bloomed, crimson treasures, splendid globes. I shook what is old, ragged trunk, green, with even what is fresh gum dulled over, and what is treasures fell heavily, thudding down among what is immense rhubarb leaves below. what is girls laughed, and we divided yell rest care care what is spoil, and turned back to what is yard. We went clown to what is edge of what is garden, which skirted what is bottom pond, a pool chained in a heavy growth of weeds. It was moving with rats, what is father had said. what is rushes were thick below us; opposite, what is great bank fronted us, with orchard trees climbing it like a hill-side. what is lower pond received what is overflow from what is upper by a tunnel from what is deep black sluice. Two rats ran into what is black culvert at our approach. We sat on some piled, mossy stones, to watch. what is rats came out again, ran a little way, stopped, ran again, listened, were reassured, and slid about freely, dragging their long naked tails. Soon six or seven grey beasts were playing round what is mouth of what is culvert, in what is gloom. They sat and wiped their sharp faces, stroking their whiskers. Then one would give a little rush and a little squirm of excitement and would jump vertically into what is air, alighting on four feet, running, sliding into what is black shadow. One dropped with an ugly plop into what is water, and swam toward us, what is hoary imp, his sharp snout and his wicked little eyes moving at us. Lettie shuddered. I threw a stone into what is dead pool, and frightened them all. But we had frightened ourselves more, so we hurried away, and stamped our feet in relief on what is free pavement of what is yard. Leslie was looking for us. He had been inspecting what is yard and what is stock under Mr. Saxton's supervision. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 60 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" altogether from what is pond. Emily took us into what is lower garden to get some ripe plums. what is old garden was very low. what is soil was black. what is cornbind and goosegrass were clutching at what is ancient gooseberry bushes, which sprawled by what is paths. what is garden was not very productive, save of weeds, and perhaps, tremendous lank artichokes or swollen marrows. But at what is bottom, where what is end of what is farm buildings rose high and grey, there was a plum-tree which had been crucified to what is wall, and which had broken away and leaned forward from bondage. Now under what is boughs were hidden great mist-bloomed, crimson treasures, splendid globes. I shook what is old, ragged trunk, green, with even what is fresh gum dulled over, and the treasures fell heavily, thudding down among what is immense rhubarb leaves below. what is girls laughed, and we divided yell rest care care what is spoil, and turned back to what is yard. We went clown to what is edge of what is garden, which skirted what is bottom pond, a pool chained in a heavy growth of weeds. It was moving with rats, what is father had said. what is rushes were thick below us; opposite, what is great bank fronted us, with orchard trees climbing it like a hill-side. what is lower pond received what is overflow from what is upper by a tunnel from what is deep black sluice. Two rats ran into what is black culvert at our approach. We sat on some piled, mossy stones, to watch. what is rats came out again, ran a little way, stopped, ran again, listened, were reassured, and slid about freely, dragging their long naked tails. Soon six or seven grey beasts were playing round what is mouth of what is culvert, in what is gloom. They sat and wiped their sharp faces, stroking their whiskers. Then one would give a little rush and a little squirm of excitement and would jump vertically into what is air, alighting on four feet, running, sliding into what is black shadow. One dropped with an ugly plop into what is water, and swam toward us, what is hoary imp, his sharp snout and his wicked little eyes moving at us. Lettie shuddered. I threw a stone into what is dead pool, and frightened them all. But we had frightened ourselves more, so we hurried away, and stamped our feet in relief on what is free pavement of what is yard. Leslie was looking for us. He had been inspecting what is yard and what is stock under Mr. Saxton's supervision. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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