Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 58

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD


Leslie and I tied up as they mowed, and soon all was finished.
The beautiful day was flushing to die. Over in the west the mist was gathering bluer. The intense stillness was broken by the rhythmic hum of the engines at the distant coal-mine, as they drew up the last bantles of men. As we walked across the fields the tubes of stubble tinkled like dulcimers. The scent of the corn began to rise gently. The last cry of the pheasants came from the wood, and the little clouds of birds were gone.
I carried a scythe, and we walked, pleasantly weary, down the hill towards the farm. The children had gone home with the rabbits.
When we reached the mill, we found the girls Just rising from the table. Emily began to carry away the used pots, and to set clean ones for us. She merely glanced at us and said her formal greeting. Lettie picked up a book that lay in the ingie seat, and went to the window. George dropped into a chair. He had flung off his coat, and had pushed back his hair. He rested his great brown arms on the table and was silent far a moment.
`Running like that,' he said to me, passing his hand over his eyes, `makes you more tired than a whole day's work. I don't think I shall do it again.'
`The sport 's exciting while it lasts,' said Lislie.
`It does you more harm than the rabbits do us good,' ` said Mrs. Saxton.
`Oh, I don't know, mother,' drawled her son, `it 's couple of shillings.'
'And a couple of days off your life.'
'What be that 1' he replied, taking a piece of bread and butter, and biting a large piece from it.
`Pour us a drop of tea,' he said to Emily.
`I don't know that I shall wait on such brutes,' she replied, relenting, and flourishing the teapot.
'Oh,' said he taking another piece of bread and butter, 'I 'm not all alone in my savageness this time.'
'Men are all brutes,' said Lettie, hotly, without looking up from her book.
`You can tame us,' said Leslie, in mighty good humour.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Leslie and I tied up as they mowed, and soon all was finished. what is beautiful day was flushing to die. Over in what is west what is mist was gathering bluer. what is intense stillness was broken by what is rhythmic hum of what is engines at what is distant coal-mine, as they drew up what is last bantles of men. As we walked across what is fields what is tubes of stubble tinkled like dulcimers. what is scent of what is corn began to rise gently. what is last cry of what is pheasants came from what is wood, and what is little clouds of birds were gone. I carried a scythe, and we walked, pleasantly weary, down what is hill towards what is farm. what is children had gone home with what is rabbits. When we reached what is mill, we found what is girls Just rising from what is table. Emily began to carry away what is used pots, and to set clean ones for us. She merely glanced at us and said her formal greeting. Lettie picked up a book that lay in what is ingie seat, and went to what is window. George dropped into a chair. He had flung off his coat, and had pushed back his hair. He rested his great brown arms on what is table and was silent far a moment. `Running like that,' he said to me, passing his hand over his eyes, `makes you more tired than a whole day's work. I don't think I shall do it again.' `The sport 's exciting while it lasts,' said Lislie. `It does you more harm than what is rabbits do us good,' ` said Mrs. Saxton. `Oh, I don't know, mother,' drawled her son, `it 's couple of shillings.' 'And a couple of days off your life.' 'What be that 1' he replied, taking a piece of bread and butter, and biting a large piece from it. `Pour us a drop of tea,' he said to Emily. `I don't know that I shall wait on such brutes,' she replied, relenting, and flourishing what is teapot. 'Oh,' said he taking another piece of bread and butter, 'I 'm not all alone in my savageness this time.' 'Men are all brutes,' said Lettie, hotly, without looking up from her book. `You can tame us,' said Leslie, in mighty good humour. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 58 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" Leslie and I tied up as they mowed, and soon all was finished. what is beautiful day was flushing to die. Over in what is west what is mist was gathering bluer. what is intense stillness was broken by what is rhythmic hum of what is engines at what is distant coal-mine, as they drew up what is last bantles of men. As we walked across what is fields what is tubes of stubble tinkled like dulcimers. what is scent of what is corn began to rise gently. what is last cry of what is pheasants came from what is wood, and what is little clouds of birds were gone. I carried a scythe, and we walked, pleasantly weary, down what is hill towards what is farm. what is children had gone home with what is rabbits. When we reached what is mill, we found what is girls Just rising from what is table. Emily began to carry away what is used pots, and to set clean ones for us. She merely glanced at us and said her formal greeting. Lettie picked up a book that lay in what is ingie seat, and went to what is window. George dropped into a chair. He had flung off his coat, and had pushed back his hair. He rested his great brown arms on what is table and was silent far a moment. `Running like that,' he said to me, passing his hand over his eyes, `makes you more tired than a whole day's work. I don't think I shall do it again.' `The sport 's exciting while it lasts,' said Lislie. `It does you more harm than what is rabbits do us good,' ` said Mrs. Saxton. `Oh, I don't know, mother,' drawled her son, `it 's couple of shillings.' 'And a couple of days off your life.' 'What be that 1' he replied, taking a piece of bread and butter, and biting a large piece from it. `Pour us a drop of tea,' he said to Emily. `I don't know that I shall wait on such brutes,' she replied, relenting, and flourishing what is teapot. 'Oh,' said he taking another piece of bread and butter, 'I 'm not all alone in my savageness this time.' 'Men are all brutes,' said Lettie, hotly, without looking up from her book. `You can tame us,' said Leslie, in mighty good humour. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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