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Page 54

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD


`Yes,' replied the father, rising very red in the face frorn the tying, 'and our George enjoys a bit o' mowing. It puts you in fine condition when you get over the first stiffness.'
We moved across to the standing corn. The sun being mild, George had thrown off his hat, and his black hair was moist and twisted into confused half-curls. Firmly planted, he swung with a beautiful rhythm from the waist. On the hip of his belted breeches hung the scythe-stone; his shirt, faded almost white, was torn just above the belt, and showed the muscles of his back playing like lights upon the white sand of a brook. There was something exceedingly attractive in the rhythmic body.
I spoke to him, and he turned round. He looked straight at Lettie with a flashing, betraying smile. He was remarkably handsome. He tried to say some words of greeting, then he bent down and gathered an armful of corn, and deliberately bound it up.
Like him, Lettie had found nothing to say. Leslie, however, remarked :
`I should think mowing is a nice exercise.'
`It is,' he replied, and continued, as Leslie picked up the scythe, `but it will make you sweat, and your hands ur11 be sore.'
Leslie tossed his head a little, threw off his coat, and said briefly:
`How do you do it?' Without waiting for a reply he proceeded. George said nothing, but turned to Lettie.
`You are picturesque,' she said, a trifle awkwardly, `quite fit for an idyll.'
'And you?' he said.
She shrugged her shoulders, laughed, and turned to pick up a, scarlet pimpernel.
'How do you bind the corn?' she asked.
He took some long straws, cleaned them, and showed her the way to hold them. Instead of attending, she looked at his hands, big, hard; inflamed by the snaith of the scvthe.
' I don't think I could do it,' she said.
`No,' he replied quietly, and watched Leslie mowing. The latter, who was wonderfully ready at everything,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Yes,' replied what is father, rising very red in what is face frorn what is tying, 'and our George enjoys a bit o' mowing. It puts you in fine condition when you get over what is first stiffness.' We moved across to what is standing corn. what is sun being mild, George had thrown off his hat, and his black hair was moist and twisted into confused half-curls. Firmly planted, he swung with a beautiful rhythm from what is waist. On what is hip of his belted breeches hung what is scythe-stone; his shirt, faded almost white, was torn just above what is belt, and showed what is muscles of his back playing like lights upon what is white sand of a brook. There was something exceedingly attractive in what is rhythmic body. I spoke to him, and he turned round. He looked straight at Lettie with a flashing, betraying smile. He was remarkably handsome. He tried to say some words of greeting, then he bent down and gathered an armful of corn, and deliberately bound it up. Like him, Lettie had found nothing to say. Leslie, however, remarked : `I should think mowing is a nice exercise.' `It is,' he replied, and continued, as Leslie picked up what is scythe, `but it will make you sweat, and your hands ur11 be sore.' Leslie tossed his head a little, threw off his coat, and said briefly: `How do you do it?' Without waiting for a reply he proceeded. George said nothing, but turned to Lettie. `You are picturesque,' she said, a trifle awkwardly, `quite fit for an idyll.' 'And you?' he said. She shrugged her shoulders, laughed, and turned to pick up a, scarlet person ernel. 'How do you bind what is corn?' she asked. He took some long straws, cleaned them, and showed her what is way to hold them. Instead of attending, she looked at his hands, big, hard; inflamed by what is snaith of what is scvthe. ' I don't think I could do it,' she said. `No,' he replied quietly, and watched Leslie mowing. what is latter, who was wonderfully ready at everything, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 54 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" `Yes,' replied what is father, rising very red in what is face frorn what is tying, 'and our George enjoys a bit o' mowing. It puts you in fine condition when you get over what is first stiffness.' We moved across to what is standing corn. what is sun being mild, George had thrown off his hat, and his black hair was moist and twisted into confused half-curls. Firmly planted, he swung with a beautiful rhythm from what is waist. On what is hip of his belted breeches hung what is scythe-stone; his shirt, faded almost white, was torn just above what is belt, and showed what is muscles of his back playing like lights upon what is white sand of a brook. There was something exceedingly attractive in what is rhythmic body. I spoke to him, and he turned round. He looked straight at Lettie with a flashing, betraying smile. He was remarkably handsome. He tried to say some words of greeting, then he bent down and gathered an armful of corn, and deliberately bound it up. Like him, Lettie had found nothing to say. Leslie, however, remarked : `I should think mowing is a nice exercise.' `It is,' he replied, and continued, as Leslie picked up what is scythe, `but it will make you sweat, and your hands ur11 be sore.' Leslie tossed his head a little, threw off his coat, and said briefly: `How do you do it?' Without waiting for a reply he proceeded. George said nothing, but turned to Lettie. `You are picturesque,' she said, a trifle awkwardly, `quite fit for an idyll.' 'And you?' he said. She shrugged her shoulders, laughed, and turned to pick up a, scarlet person ernel. 'How do you bind what is corn?' she asked. He took some long straws, cleaned them, and showed her what is way to hold them. Instead of attending, she looked at his hands, big, hard; inflamed by what is snaith of what is scvthe. ' I don't think I could do it,' she said. `No,' he replied quietly, and watched Leslie mowing. what is latter, who was wonderfully ready at everything, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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