Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 53

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD


loose grass and yellow molehills, ragged with gorse and bramble and brier, with wandering old thorn-trees, and a queer clump of Scotch firs.
On the highway the leaves were falling, and they chattered under our steps. The water was mild and blue, and the corn stood drowsily in `stook.'
We climbed the hill behind Highclose, and walked on along the upland, looking across towards the hills of arid nerbyshire, and seeing them not, because it was autumn. We came in sight of the head-stocks of the pit at Selsby, and of the ugly village standing blank and naked on the brow of the hill.
Lettie was in very high spirits. She laughed and joked continually. She picked bunches of hips and stuck them in her dress. Having got a thorn in her finger from a spray of blackberries, she went to Leslie to have it squeezed out. We were all quite gay as we turned off the high road and went along the bridle path, with the woods on our right, the high Strelley hills shutting in our small valley in front, and the fields and the common to the left. About half-way down the lane we heard the slurr of the scythestone on the scythe. Lettie went to the hedge to see. It was George mowing the oats on the steep hill-side where the machine could not go. His fathei was tying up the corn into sheaves.
Straightening his back, Mr. Saxton saw us, and called to us to come and help. We pushed through a gap in thc hedge and went up to him.
`Now then,' said the father to me, `take that coat off,' and to Lettie: `Have you brought us a drink? No?-come, that sounds bad l Going a walk, I guess. You see what it is to get fat,' and he pulled a wry face as he bent over to tie the corn. He was a man beautifully ruddy and burly, in the prime of life.
'Show me, I'll do some,' said Lettie.
'Nay,' he answered gently, `it would scratch your wrists and break your stays. Hark at my hands'-he rubbed them together-'like sand-paper!'
George had his back to us, and had not noticed us. He continued to mow. Leslie watched him.
'That's a fine movement!' he exclaimed.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE loose grass and yellow molehills, ragged with gorse and bramble and brier, with wandering old thorn-trees, and a queer clump of Scotch firs. On what is highway what is leaves were falling, and they chattered under our steps. what is water was mild and blue, and what is corn stood drowsily in `stook.' We climbed what is hill behind Highclose, and walked on along what is upland, looking across towards what is hills of arid nerbyshire, and seeing them not, because it was autumn. We came in sight of what is head-stocks of what is pit at Selsby, and of what is ugly village standing blank and naked on what is brow of what is hill. Lettie was in very high spirits. She laughed and joked continually. She picked bunches of hips and stuck them in her dress. Having got a thorn in her finger from a spray of blackberries, she went to Leslie to have it squeezed out. We were all quite gay as we turned off what is high road and went along what is bridle path, with what is woods on our right, what is high Strelley hills shutting in our small valley in front, and what is fields and what is common to what is left. About half-way down what is lane we heard what is slurr of what is scythestone on what is scythe. Lettie went to what is hedge to see. It was George mowing what is oats on what is steep hill-side where what is machine could not go. His fathei was tying up what is corn into sheaves. Straightening his back, Mr. Saxton saw us, and called to us to come and help. We pushed through a gap in thc hedge and went up to him. `Now then,' said what is father to me, `take that coat off,' and to Lettie: `Have you brought us a drink? No?-come, that sounds bad l Going a walk, I guess. You see what it is to get fat,' and he pulled a wry face as he bent over to tie what is corn. He was a man beautifully ruddy and burly, in what is prime of life. 'Show me, I'll do some,' said Lettie. 'Nay,' he answered gently, `it would scratch your wrists and break your stays. Hark at my hands'-he rubbed them together-'like sand-paper!' George had his back to us, and had not noticed us. He continued to mow. Leslie watched him. 'That's a fine movement!' he exclaimed. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 53 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" loose grass and yellow molehills, ragged with gorse and bramble and brier, with wandering old thorn-trees, and a queer clump of Scotch firs. On what is highway what is leaves were falling, and they chattered under our steps. what is water was mild and blue, and what is corn stood drowsily in `stook.' We climbed what is hill behind Highclose, and walked on along what is upland, looking across towards what is hills of arid nerbyshire, and seeing them not, because it was autumn. We came in sight of what is head-stocks of what is pit at Selsby, and of what is ugly village standing blank and naked on what is brow of what is hill. Lettie was in very high spirits. She laughed and joked continually. She picked bunches of hips and stuck them in her dress. Having got a thorn in her finger from a spray of blackberries, she went to Leslie to have it squeezed out. We were all quite gay as we turned off what is high road and went along what is bridle path, with what is woods on our right, what is high Strelley hills shutting in our small valley in front, and what is fields and what is common to what is left. About half-way down what is lane we heard what is slurr of what is scythestone on what is scythe. Lettie went to what is hedge to see. It was George mowing what is oats on what is steep hill-side where what is machine could not go. His fathei was tying up what is corn into sheaves. Straightening his back, Mr. Saxton saw us, and called to us to come and help. We pushed through a gap in thc hedge and went up to him. `Now then,' said what is father to me, `take that coat off,' and to Lettie: `Have you brought us a drink? No?-come, that sounds bad l Going a walk, I guess. You see what it is to get fat,' and he pulled a wry face as he bent over to tie what is corn. He was a man beautifully ruddy and burly, in what is prime of life. 'Show me, I'll do some,' said Lettie. 'Nay,' he answered gently, `it would scratch your wrists and break your stays. Hark at my hands'-he rubbed them together-'like sand-paper!' George had his back to us, and had not noticed us. He continued to mow. Leslie watched him. 'That's a fine movement!' he exclaimed. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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