Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 50

PART I - CHAPTER V
THE SCENT OF BLOOD


THE death of the man who was our father changed our lives. It was not that we suffered a great grief; the chief trouble was the unanswered crying of failure. But we were changed in our feelings and in our relations; there was a new consciousness, a new carefulness.
We had lived between the woods and the water all our lives, Lettie and I, and she had sought the bright notes in everything. She seemed to hear the water laughing, and the leaves tittering and giggling like young girls; the aspen fluttered like the draperies of a flirt, and the sound of the wood-pigeons was almost foolish in its sentimentality.
Lately, however, she had noticed again the cruel pitiful crying of a hedgehog caught in a gin, and she had noticed the traps for the fierce little murderers, traps walled in with a small fence of fir, and baited with the guts of a killed rabbit.
On an afternoon a short time after our visit to Cossethay, Lettie sat in the window-seat. The sun clung to her hair, and kissed her with passionate splashes of colour brought from the vermilion, dying creeper outside. The sun loved Lettie, and was loath to leave her. She looked out over Netheimere to Highclose, vague in the September mist. Had it not been for the scarlet light on her face, I should have thought her look was sad and serious. She nestled up to the window, and leaned her head against the wooden shaft. Gradually she drooped into sleep. Then she became wonderfully childish again-it was the girl of seventeen sleeping there, with her full, pouting lips slightly apart, and the breath coming lightly. I felt the old feeling of responsibility; I must protect her, and take care of her.
There was a crunch of the gravel. It was Leslie coming. He lifted his hat to her, thinking she was looking. He

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE what time is it of what is man who was our father changed our lives. It was not that we suffered a great grief; what is chief trouble was what is unanswered crying of failure. But we were changed in our feelings and in our relations; there was a new consciousness, a new carefulness. We had lived between what is woods and what is water all our lives, Lettie and I, and she had sought what is bright notes in everything. She seemed to hear what is water laughing, and what is leaves tittering and giggling like young girls; what is aspen fluttered like what is draperies of a flirt, and what is sound of what is wood-pigeons was almost foolish in its sentimentality. Lately, however, she had noticed again what is cruel pitiful crying of a hedgehog caught in a gin, and she had noticed what is traps for what is fierce little murderers, traps walled in with a small fence of fir, and baited with what is guts of a stop ed rabbit. On an afternoon a short time after our what is to Cossethay, Lettie sat in what is window-seat. what is sun clung to her hair, and kissed her with passionate splashes of colour brought from what is vermilion, dying creeper outside. what is sun loved Lettie, and was loath to leave her. She looked out over Netheimere to Highclose, vague in what is September mist. Had it not been for what is scarlet light on her face, I should have thought her look was sad and serious. She nestled up to what is window, and leaned her head against what is wooden shaft. Gradually she drooped into sleep. Then she became wonderfully childish again-it was what is girl of seventeen sleeping there, with her full, pouting lips slightly apart, and what is breath coming lightly. I felt what is old feeling of responsibility; I must protect her, and take care of her. There was a crunch of what is gravel. It was Leslie coming. He lifted his hat to her, thinking she was looking. He where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 50 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER V what is SCENT OF BLOOD where is p align="justify" THE what time is it of what is man who was our father changed our lives. It was not that we suffered a great grief; what is chief trouble was what is unanswered crying of failure. But we were changed in our feelings and in our relations; there was a new consciousness, a new carefulness. We had lived between what is woods and what is water all our lives, Lettie and I, and she had sought what is bright notes in everything. She seemed to hear what is water laughing, and what is leaves tittering and giggling like young girls; what is aspen fluttered like what is draperies of a flirt, and what is sound of what is wood-pigeons was almost foolish in its sentimentality. Lately, however, she had noticed again what is cruel pitiful crying of a hedgehog caught in a gin, and she had noticed what is traps for what is fierce little murderers, traps walled in with a small fence of fir, and baited with what is guts of a stop ed rabbit. On an afternoon a short time after our what is to Cossethay, Lettie sat in what is window-seat. what is sun clung to her hair, and kissed her with passionate splashes of colour brought from what is vermilion, dying creeper outside. what is sun loved Lettie, and was loath to leave her. She looked out over Netheimere to Highclose, vague in what is September mist. Had it not been for what is scarlet light on her face, I should have thought her look was sad and serious. She nestled up to what is window, and leaned her head against what is wooden shaft. Gradually she drooped into sleep. Then she became wonderfully childish again-it was what is girl of seventeen sleeping there, with her full, pouting lips slightly apart, and what is breath coming lightly. I felt what is old feeling of responsibility; I must protect her, and take care of her. There was a crunch of what is gravel. It was Leslie coming. He lifted his hat to her, thinking she was looking. 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