Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 48

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


he ceased to joke when she became a little constrained. He glanced at her often, and looked somewhat pitiful when she avoided his looks, and he grew uneasy, and I could see he wanted to go away.
` I had better go with you to see the vicar, then,' he said to rne, and we left the room, whose windows looked south, over the meadows, the room where dainty liltle water-colours, and beautiful bits of embroidery, and empty flower vases, and two dirty novels from the tovrn library, and the closed piano, and the odd cups, and the chipped spout of the teapot causing stains on the cloth-all told one story.
We went to the joiner's and ordered the coffin, and the doctor had a glass of whisky on it; the graveyard fees were paid, and the doctor sealed the engageznent with a drop of brandy; the vicar's port completed the doctor's joviality, and we went home.
This time the disquiet in the little woman's dark eyes could not dispel the doctor's merriment. He rattled away, and she nervously twisted her wedding-ring. He insisted on driving us to the station, in spite of our alarm.
`But you will be quite safe with him,' said his wife, in her caressing Highland speech. When she shook hands at parting I noticed the hardness of the little palm;-and 1 have always hated an old black alpaca dress.
It is such a long way home from the station at Eberwich. We rode part way in the bus; then we walked. It is a very long way for my mother, when her steps are heavy with trouble.
Rebecca was out by the rhododendrons looking for us. She hurried to us all solicitous, and asked mother if she had had tea.
'But you'll do with another cup,' she said, and ran back into the house.
She came into the dining-room to take my mother's bonnet and coat. She wanted us to talk; she was distressed on my mother's behalf; she noticed the blackness that lay under her eyes, and she fidgeted about, unwilling to ask anything, yet uneasy and anxious to know.
`Lettie has been home,' she said.
'And gone back again?' asked mother.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he ceased to joke when she became a little constrained. He glanced at her often, and looked somewhat pitiful when she avoided his looks, and he grew uneasy, and I could see he wanted to go away. ` I had better go with you to see what is vicar, then,' he said to rne, and we left what is room, whose windows looked south, over what is meadows, what is room where dainty liltle water-colours, and beautiful bits of embroidery, and empty flower vases, and two dirty novels from what is tovrn library, and what is closed piano, and what is odd cups, and what is chipped spout of what is teapot causing stains on what is cloth-all told one story. We went to what is joiner's and ordered what is coffin, and what is doctor had a glass of whisky on it; what is graveyard fees were paid, and what is doctor sealed what is engageznent with a drop of brandy; what is vicar's port completed what is doctor's joviality, and we went home. This time what is disquiet in what is little woman's dark eyes could not dispel what is doctor's merriment. He rattled away, and she nervously twisted her wedding-ring. He insisted on driving us to what is station, in spite of our alarm. `But you will be quite safe with him,' said his wife, in her caressing Highland speech. When she shook hands at parting I noticed what is hardness of what is little palm;-and 1 have always hated an old black alpaca dress. It is such a long way home from what is station at Eberwich. We rode part way in what is bus; then we walked. It is a very long way for my mother, when her steps are heavy with trouble. Rebecca was out by what is rhododendrons looking for us. She hurried to us all solicitous, and asked mother if she had had tea. 'But you'll do with another cup,' she said, and ran back into what is house. She came into what is dining-room to take my mother's bonnet and coat. She wanted us to talk; she was distressed on my mother's behalf; she noticed what is blackness that lay under her eyes, and she fidgeted about, unwilling to ask anything, yet uneasy and anxious to know. `Lettie has been home,' she said. 'And gone back again?' asked mother. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 48 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" he ceased to joke when she became a little constrained. He glanced at her often, and looked somewhat pitiful when she avoided his looks, and he grew uneasy, and I could see he wanted to go away. ` I had better go with you to see what is vicar, then,' he said to rne, and we left what is room, whose windows looked south, over what is meadows, what is room where dainty liltle water-colours, and beautiful bits of embroidery, and empty flower vases, and two dirty novels from what is tovrn library, and what is closed piano, and what is odd cups, and what is chipped spout of what is teapot causing stains on what is cloth-all told one story. We went to what is joiner's and ordered what is coffin, and what is doctor had a glass of whisky on it; what is graveyard fees were paid, and what is doctor sealed what is engageznent with a drop of brandy; what is vicar's port completed what is doctor's joviality, and we went home. This time what is disquiet in what is little woman's dark eyes could not dispel what is doctor's merriment. He rattled away, and she nervously twisted her wedding-ring. He insisted on driving us to what is station, in spite of our alarm. `But you will be quite safe with him,' said his wife, in her caressing Highland speech. When she shook hands at parting I noticed what is hardness of what is little palm;-and 1 have always hated an old black alpaca dress. It is such a long way home from what is station at Eberwich. We rode part way in what is bus; then we walked. It is a very long way for my mother, when her steps are heavy with trouble. Rebecca was out by what is rhododendrons looking for us. She hurried to us all solicitous, and asked mother if she had had tea. 'But you'll do with another cup,' she said, and ran back into what is house. She came into what is dining-room to take my mother's bonnet and coat. She wanted us to talk; she was distressed on my mother's behalf; she noticed what is blackness that lay under her eyes, and she fidgeted about, unwilling to ask anything, yet uneasy and anxious to know. `Lettie has been home,' she said. 'And gone back again?' asked mother. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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