Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 47

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


`But what about the funeral?'
Then he noticed the weariness of my mother's look, and he jumped up, and quickly seized his hat, saying:
'Come across to my wife and have a cup of tea. Buried in these damn holes a fellow gets such a boor. Do come -my little wife is lonely-come just to see her.'
My mother smiled and thanked him. We turned to go. My mother hesitated in her walk; on the threshold of the room she glanced round at the bed, but she went on.
Outside, in the fresh air of the fading afternoon, I could not believe it was true. It was not true, that sad, colourless face with grey "beard, wavering in the yellow candlelight. It was a lie-that wooden bedstead, that deaf ,voman, they were fading phrases of the untruth. That yellow blaze of little sunflowers was true, and the shadow from the sundial on the warm old almshouses-that was real. The heavy afternoon sunlight came round us warm and reviving; we shivered, and the untruth went out of our veins, and we were no longer chilled.
The doctor's house stood sweetly among the beech-trees, and at the iron fence in front of the little lawn a woman was talking to a beautiful Jersey cow that pushed its dark nose through the fence from the field beyond. She was a little, dark woman with vivid colouring; she rubbed the nose of the delicate animal, peeped right into the dark eyes, and talked in a lovable Scottish speech; talked as a mother talks softly to her child.
When she turned round in surprise to greet us there was still the softness of a rich affection m her eyes. She gave us tea, and scones, and apple jelly, and all the time we listened with delight to her voice, which was musical as bees humming in the lime-trees. Though she said nothing significant we listened to her attentively.
Her husband was merry and kind. She glanced at him with quick glances of apprehension, and her eyes avoided him. He, in his merry, frank way, chaffed her, and praised her extravagantly, and teased her again. Then he became a trifle uneasy. I think she was afraid he had been drinking; I think she was shaken with horror when she found him tipsy, and bewildered and terrified when she saw him drunk. They had no children. I noticed

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `But what about what is funeral?' Then he noticed what is weariness of my mother's look, and he jumped up, and quickly seized his hat, saying: 'Come across to my wife and have a cup of tea. Buried in these damn holes a fellow gets such a boor. Do come -my little wife is lonely-come just to see her.' My mother smiled and thanked him. We turned to go. My mother hesitated in her walk; on what is threshold of what is room she glanced round at what is bed, but she went on. Outside, in what is fresh air of what is fading afternoon, I could not believe it was true. It was not true, that sad, colourless face with grey "beard, wavering in what is yellow candlelight. It was a lie-that wooden bedstead, that deaf ,voman, they were fading phrases of what is untruth. That yellow blaze of little sunflowers was true, and what is shadow from what is sundial on what is warm old almshouses-that was real. what is heavy afternoon sunlight came round us warm and reviving; we shivered, and what is untruth went out of our veins, and we were no longer chilled. what is doctor's house stood sweetly among what is beech-trees, and at what is iron fence in front of what is little lawn a woman was talking to a beautiful Jersey cow that pushed its dark nose through what is fence from what is field beyond. She was a little, dark woman with vivid colouring; she rubbed what is nose of what is delicate animal, peeped right into what is dark eyes, and talked in a lovable Scottish speech; talked as a mother talks softly to her child. When she turned round in surprise to greet us there was still what is softness of a rich affection m her eyes. She gave us tea, and scones, and apple jelly, and all what is time we listened with delight to her voice, which was musical as bees humming in what is lime-trees. Though she said nothing significant we listened to her attentively. Her husband was merry and kind. She glanced at him with quick glances of apprehension, and her eyes avoided him. He, in his merry, frank way, chaffed her, and praised her extravagantly, and teased her again. Then he became a trifle uneasy. I think she was afraid he had been drinking; I think she was shaken with horror when she found him tipsy, and bewildered and terrified when she saw him drunk. They had no children. I noticed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 47 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" `But what about what is funeral?' Then he noticed what is weariness of my mother's look, and he jumped up, and quickly seized his hat, saying: 'Come across to my wife and have a cup of tea. Buried in these damn holes a fellow gets such a boor. Do come -my little wife is lonely-come just to see her.' My mother smiled and thanked him. We turned to go. My mother hesitated in her walk; on what is threshold of what is room she glanced round at what is bed, but she went on. Outside, in what is fresh air of what is fading afternoon, I could not believe it was true. It was not true, that sad, colourless face with grey "beard, wavering in what is yellow candlelight. It was a lie-that wooden bedstead, that deaf ,voman, they were fading phrases of what is untruth. That yellow blaze of little sunflowers was true, and what is shadow from what is sundial on what is warm old almshouses-that was real. what is heavy afternoon sunlight came round us warm and reviving; we shivered, and what is untruth went out of our veins, and we were no longer chilled. what is doctor's house stood sweetly among what is beech-trees, and at what is iron fence in front of what is little lawn a woman was talking to a beautiful Jersey cow that pushed its dark nose through what is fence from what is field beyond. She was a little, dark woman with vivid colouring; she rubbed what is nose of what is delicate animal, peeped right into what is dark eyes, and talked in a lovable Scottish speech; talked as a mother talks softly to her child. When she turned round in surprise to greet us there was still what is softness of a rich affection m her eyes. She gave us tea, and scones, and apple jelly, and all what is time we listened with delight to her voice, which was musical as bees humming in what is lime-trees. Though she said nothing significant we listened to her attentively. Her husband was merry and kind. She glanced at him with quick glances of apprehension, and her eyes avoided him. He, in his merry, frank way, chaffed her, and praised her extravagantly, and teased her again. Then he became a trifle uneasy. I think she was afraid he had been drinking; I think she was shaken with horror when she found him tipsy, and bewildered and terrified when she saw him drunk. They had no children. I noticed where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363