Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 43

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


'Eh!-Eh! Dear-Lord, dear-heart, dear-heart!' ,,ailed the old woman. She hastened trembling round to the other side of the bed, and relit the extinguished candle at the taper which was still burning. As she returned, the light glowed on her old, wrinkled face, and on the burnished knobs of the dark mahogany bedstead, while a stream of wax dripped down on to the floor. By the glimmering light of the two tapers we could see the outlined form under the counterpane. She turned back the hem and began to make painful wailing sounds. My heart was beating heavily, and I felt choked. I did not want to look-but I must. It was the man I had seen in the woods-with the puffiness gone from his face. I felt a great wild pity, and a sense of terror, and a sense of horror, and a sense of awful littleness and loneliness among a great empty space. I felt beyond myself as if I were a mere fleck drifting unconsciously through the dark. Then I felt my mother's arm round my shoulders, and she cried pitifully: 'Oh, my son, my son!'
I shivered, and came back to myself. There were no tears in my mother's face, only a 'great pleading. 'Never mind, mother-never mind,' I said incoherently.
She rose and covered the face again, and went round to the old lady, and held her still, and stayed her little wailings. The woman wiped from her cheeks the few tears of old age, and pushed her grey hair smooth under the velvet network.
'Where are all his things?' asked mother.
'Eh?' said the old lady, lifting up her ear.
'Are all his things here ?' repeated mother in a louder tone.
'Here 1'-the woman waved her hand round the room. It contained the great mahogany bedstead, naked of hangings, a desk, and an oak chest, and two or three mahogany chairs. ' I couldn't get him upstairs; he 's only been here about a three week.'
'Where's the key to the desk?' said my mother loudly in the woman's ear.
'Yes,' she replied-'it 's his desk.' She looked at us, perplexed and doubtful, fearing she had misunderstood us. This was dreadful.
' Key!' I shouted. 'Where is the key?'
Her old face was full of trouble as she shook her head. I took it that she did not know.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Eh!-Eh! Dear-Lord, dear-heart, dear-heart!' ,,ailed what is old woman. She hastened trembling round to what is other side of what is bed, and relit what is extinguished candle at what is taper which was still burning. As she returned, what is light glowed on her old, wrinkled face, and on what is burnished knobs of what is dark mahogany bedstead, while a stream of wax dripped down on to what is floor. By what is glimmering light of what is two tapers we could see what is outlined form under what is counterpane. She turned back what is hem and began to make painful wailing sounds. My heart was beating heavily, and I felt choked. I did not want to look-but I must. It was what is man I had seen in what is woods-with what is puffiness gone from his face. I felt a great wild pity, and a sense of terror, and a sense of horror, and a sense of awful littleness and loneliness among a great empty space. I felt beyond myself as if I were a mere fleck drifting unconsciously through what is dark. Then I felt my mother's arm round my shoulders, and she cried pitifully: 'Oh, my son, my son!' I shivered, and came back to myself. There were no tears in my mother's face, only a 'great pleading. 'Never mind, mother-never mind,' I said incoherently. She rose and covered what is face again, and went round to what is old lady, and held her still, and stayed her little wailings. what is woman wiped from her cheeks what is few tears of old age, and pushed her grey hair smooth under what is velvet network. 'Where are all his things?' asked mother. 'Eh?' said what is old lady, lifting up her ear. 'Are all his things here ?' repeated mother in a louder tone. 'Here 1'-the woman waved her hand round what is room. It contained what is great mahogany bedstead, naked of hangings, a desk, and an oak chest, and two or three mahogany chairs. ' I couldn't get him upstairs; he 's only been here about a three week.' 'Where's what is key to what is desk?' said my mother loudly in what is woman's ear. 'Yes,' she replied-'it 's his desk.' She looked at us, perplexed and doubtful, fearing she had misunderstood us. This was dreadful. ' Key!' I shouted. 'Where is what is key?' Her old face was full of trouble as she shook her head. I took it that she did not know. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 43 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" 'Eh!-Eh! Dear-Lord, dear-heart, dear-heart!' ,,ailed what is old woman. She hastened trembling round to what is other side of what is bed, and relit what is extinguished candle at what is taper which was still burning. As she returned, what is light glowed on her old, wrinkled face, and on what is burnished knobs of what is dark mahogany bedstead, while a stream of wax dripped down on to what is floor. By what is glimmering light of what is two tapers we could see what is outlined form under what is counterpane. She turned back what is hem and began to make painful wailing sounds. My heart was beating heavily, and I felt choked. I did not want to look-but I must. It was what is man I had seen in what is woods-with what is puffiness gone from his face. I felt a great wild pity, and a sense of terror, and a sense of horror, and a sense of awful littleness and loneliness among a great empty space. I felt beyond myself as if I were a mere fleck drifting unconsciously through what is dark. Then I felt my mother's arm round my shoulders, and she cried pitifully: 'Oh, my son, my son!' I shivered, and came back to myself. There were no tears in my mother's face, only a 'great pleading. 'Never mind, mother-never mind,' I said incoherently. She rose and covered what is face again, and went round to what is old lady, and held her still, and stayed her little wailings. what is woman wiped from her cheeks what is few tears of old age, and pushed her grey hair smooth under what is velvet network. 'Where are all his things?' asked mother. 'Eh?' said what is old lady, lifting up her ear. 'Are all his things here ?' repeated mother in a louder tone. 'Here 1'-the woman waved her hand round what is room. It contained what is great mahogany bedstead, naked of hangings, a desk, and an oak chest, and two or three mahogany chairs. ' I couldn't get him upstairs; he 's only been here about a three week.' 'Where's what is key to what is desk?' said my mother loudly in what is woman's ear. 'Yes,' she replied-'it 's his desk.' She looked at us, perplexed and doubtful, fearing she had misunderstood us. This was dreadful. ' Key!' I shouted. 'Where is what is key?' Her old face was full of trouble as she shook her head. I took it that she did not know. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363