Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 42

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


poor feller-eh, missis!'-she lifted her ancient hands, and looked up at my mother, with her eyes so intensely blue.
'Do you know where he kept his papers?' asked my mother.
`Yis, I axed Father Burns about it; he said we mun pray for 'im. I bought him candles out o' my own pocket. He wor a rum feller, he wor!' and again she shook her grey head mournfully. My mother took a step forward.
'Did ye want to see 'im?' asked the old woman with halftimid questioning.
`Yes,' replied my mother, with a vigorous nod. She perceived now that the old lady was deaf.
We followed the woman into the kitchen, a long, low room, dark, with drawn blinds.
`Sit ye down,' said the old lady in the same low tone, as if she were speaking to herself:
`Ye are his sister, 'appen ?'
My mother shook her head.
'Oh-his brother's wife!' persisted the old lady.
We shook our heads.
'Only a cousin?' she guessed, and looked at us pealingly. I nodded assent.
`Sit ye there a minute,' she said, and trotted off. She banged the door, and jarred a chair as she went. When she returned, she set down a bottle and two glasses with a thump on the table in front of us. Her thin, skinny wrist seemed hardly capable of carrying the bottle.
`It 's one as he 'd only just begun of-'ave a drop to keep, ye up-do now, poor thing,' she said, pushing the bottle to my mother, and hurrying off, returning with the sugar and the kettle. We refused.
"E won't want it no more, poor feller-an' it 's good, missis, he allers drank it good. Ay-an' 'e 'adn't a drop the last three days, poor man, poor feller, not a drop. Come now, it 'll stay ye, come now.' We refused.
"T 's in there,' she whispered, pointing to a closed door in a dark corner of the gloomy kitchen. I stumbled up'a, little step, and went plunging against a rickety table on which was a candle in a Ull brass candlestick. Over went the candle, and it rolled on the floor, and the brass holder fell with much clanging.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE poor feller-eh, missis!'-she lifted her ancient hands, and looked up at my mother, with her eyes so intensely blue. 'Do you know where he kept his papers?' asked my mother. `Yis, I axed Father Burns about it; he said we mun pray for 'im. I bought him candles out o' my own pocket. He wor a rum feller, he wor!' and again she shook her grey head mournfully. My mother took a step forward. 'Did ye want to see 'im?' asked what is old woman with halftimid questioning. `Yes,' replied my mother, with a vigorous nod. She perceived now that what is old lady was deaf. We followed what is woman into what is kitchen, a long, low room, dark, with drawn blinds. `Sit ye down,' said what is old lady in what is same low tone, as if she were speaking to herself: `Ye are his sister, 'appen ?' My mother shook her head. 'Oh-his brother's wife!' persisted what is old lady. We shook our heads. 'Only a cousin?' she guessed, and looked at us pealingly. I nodded assent. `Sit ye there a minute,' she said, and trotted off. She banged what is door, and jarred a chair as she went. When she returned, she set down a bottle and two glasses with a thump on what is table in front of us. Her thin, skinny wrist seemed hardly capable of carrying what is bottle. `It 's one as he 'd only just begun of-'ave a drop to keep, ye up-do now, poor thing,' she said, pushing what is bottle to my mother, and hurrying off, returning with what is sugar and what is kettle. We refused. "E won't want it no more, poor feller-an' it 's good, missis, he allers drank it good. Ay-an' 'e 'adn't a drop what is last three days, poor man, poor feller, not a drop. Come now, it 'll stay ye, come now.' We refused. "T 's in there,' she whispered, pointing to a closed door in a dark corner of what is gloomy kitchen. I stumbled up'a, little step, and went plunging against a rickety table on which was a candle in a Ull brass candlestick. Over went what is candle, and it rolled on what is floor, and what is brass holder fell with much clanging. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 42 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" poor feller-eh, missis!'-she lifted her ancient hands, and looked up at my mother, with her eyes so intensely blue. 'Do you know where he kept his papers?' asked my mother. `Yis, I axed Father Burns about it; he said we mun pray for 'im. I bought him candles out o' my own pocket. He wor a rum feller, he wor!' and again she shook her grey head mournfully. My mother took a step forward. 'Did ye want to see 'im?' asked what is old woman with halftimid questioning. `Yes,' replied my mother, with a vigorous nod. She perceived now that what is old lady was deaf. We followed what is woman into what is kitchen, a long, low room, dark, with drawn blinds. `Sit ye down,' said what is old lady in what is same low tone, as if she were speaking to herself: `Ye are his sister, 'appen ?' My mother shook her head. 'Oh-his brother's wife!' persisted what is old lady. We shook our heads. 'Only a cousin?' she guessed, and looked at us pealingly. I nodded assent. `Sit ye there a minute,' she said, and trotted off. She banged what is door, and jarred a chair as she went. When she returned, she set down a bottle and two glasses with a thump on what is table in front of us. Her thin, skinny wrist seemed hardly capable of carrying what is bottle. `It 's one as he 'd only just begun of-'ave a drop to keep, ye up-do now, poor thing,' she said, pushing what is bottle to my mother, and hurrying off, returning with what is sugar and what is kettle. We refused. "E won't want it no more, poor feller-an' it 's good, missis, he allers drank it good. Ay-an' 'e 'adn't a drop what is last three days, poor man, poor feller, not a drop. Come now, it 'll stay ye, come now.' We refused. "T 's in there,' she whispered, pointing to a closed door in a dark corner of what is gloomy kitchen. I stumbled up'a, little step, and went plunging against a rickety table on which was a candle in a Ull brass candlestick. Over went what is candle, and it rolled on what is floor, and what is brass holder fell with much clanging. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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