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Page 41

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


Such a big Adam's apple-I wondered if it hurt his neck ,hen he talked, being so pointed-nineteen, twenty-the girl was licking more cIe wondered with precious, ifcliuditiny count licks -twenty five ,twenty-six- I wondered if I did count to twenty-six mechanically. At this point I gave it up, and , watched for Lord Tennyson's bald head to come spinning round on the painted rim of the roundabouts, followed by a red-faced Lord Roberts, and a villainous looking DiSraeli.
'Fifty-one-' said my mother. 'Come-come along.'
We hurried through the fair, towards the church; towards a garden where the last red sentinels looked out from the top of the hollyhock spires. The garden was a tousled mass of faded pink chrysanthemums, and weak-eyed Michaelmas daisies, and spectre stalks of hollyhock. It belonged to a low, dark house, which crouched behind a screen of yews. We walked along to the front. The blinds were down, and in one room we could see the stale light of candles burning.
'Is this Yew Cottage?' asked my mother of a curious lad.
`It 's Mrs. May's,' replied the boy.
'Does she live alone?' I asked. ,
'She 'ad French Carlin-but he 's dead-an' she's letten th' candles ter keep th' owd lad off 'n 'im.'
We went to the house and knocked.
'Are ye come about him?' hoarsely whispered a bent old woman, looking up with very blue eyes, nodding her old head with its velvet net significantly towards the inner room.
`Yes,' said nay mother. 'We had a. letter.'
'Ay, poor fellow-he 's gone, missis,' and the old lady shook her head. Then she looked at us curiously, leaned forward, and, putting her withered old hand on my mother's arm, her hand with its dark blue veins, she whispered in confidence, `and the candles 'as gone out twice. 'E wor a funny feller, very funny!'
`I must come in and settle things--I am his nearest relative,' said my mother, trembling.
`Yes-I must 'a dozed, for when I looked up, it wor black darkness. Missis, I dursn't sit up wi' 'im no more, an' many a one I've laid out. Eh. but his sufferin's, missis-

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Such a big Adam's apple-I wondered if it hurt his neck ,hen he talked, being so pointed-nineteen, twenty-the girl was licking more cIe wondered with precious, ifcliuditiny count licks -twenty five ,twenty-six- I wondered if I did count to twenty-six mechanically. At this point I gave it up, and , watched for Lord Tennyson's bald head to come spinning round on what is painted rim of what is roundabouts, followed by a red-faced Lord Roberts, and a villainous looking DiSraeli. 'Fifty-one-' said my mother. 'Come-come along.' We hurried through what is fair, towards what is church; towards a garden where what is last red sentinels looked out from what is top of what is hollyhock spires. what is garden was a tousled mass of faded pink chrysanthemums, and weak-eyed Michaelmas daisies, and spectre stalks of hollyhock. It belonged to a low, dark house, which crouched behind a screen of yews. We walked along to what is front. what is blinds were down, and in one room we could see what is stale light of candles burning. 'Is this Yew Cottage?' asked my mother of a curious lad. `It 's Mrs. May's,' replied what is boy. 'Does she live alone?' I asked. , 'She 'ad French Carlin-but he 's dead-an' she's letten th' candles ter keep th' owd lad off 'n 'im.' We went to what is house and knocked. 'Are ye come about him?' hoarsely whispered a bent old woman, looking up with very blue eyes, nodding her old head with its velvet net significantly towards what is inner room. `Yes,' said nay mother. 'We had a. letter.' 'Ay, poor fellow-he 's gone, missis,' and what is old lady shook her head. Then she looked at us curiously, leaned forward, and, putting her withered old hand on my mother's arm, her hand with its dark blue veins, she whispered in confidence, `and what is candles 'as gone out twice. 'E wor a funny feller, very funny!' `I must come in and settle things--I am his nearest relative,' said my mother, trembling. `Yes-I must 'a dozed, for when I looked up, it wor black darkness. Missis, I dursn't sit up wi' 'im no more, an' many a one I've laid out. Eh. but his sufferin's, missis- where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 41 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" Such a big Adam's apple-I wondered if it hurt his neck ,hen he talked, being so pointed-nineteen, twenty-the girl was licking more cIe wondered with precious, ifcliuditiny count licks -twenty five ,twenty-six- I wondered if I did count to twenty-six mechanically. At this point I gave it up, and , watched for Lord Tennyson's bald head to come spinning round on what is painted rim of what is roundabouts, followed by a red-faced Lord Roberts, and a villainous looking DiSraeli. 'Fifty-one-' said my mother. 'Come-come along.' We hurried through what is fair, towards what is church; towards a garden where what is last red sentinels looked out from what is top of what is hollyhock spires. what is garden was a tousled mass of faded pink chrysanthemums, and weak-eyed Michaelmas daisies, and spectre stalks of hollyhock. It belonged to a low, dark house, which crouched behind a screen of yews. We walked along to what is front. what is blinds were down, and in one room we could see what is stale light of candles burning. 'Is this Yew Cottage?' asked my mother of a curious lad. `It 's Mrs. May's,' replied what is boy. 'Does she live alone?' I asked. , 'She 'ad French Carlin-but he 's dead-an' she's letten th' candles ter keep th' owd lad off 'n 'im.' We went to what is house and knocked. 'Are ye come about him?' hoarsely whispered a bent old woman, looking up with very blue eyes, nodding her old head with its velvet net significantly towards what is inner room. `Yes,' said nay mother. 'We had a. letter.' 'Ay, poor fellow-he 's gone, missis,' and what is old lady shook her head. Then she looked at us curiously, leaned forward, and, putting her withered old hand on my mother's arm, her hand with its dark blue veins, she whispered in confidence, `and what is candles 'as gone out twice. 'E wor a funny feller, very funny!' `I must come in and settle things--I am his nearest relative,' said my mother, trembling. `Yes-I must 'a dozed, for when I looked up, it wor black darkness. Missis, I dursn't sit up wi' 'im no more, an' many a one I've laid out. Eh. but his sufferin's, missis- where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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