Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 39

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


'Nay, mother, it is only the shock that makes you say so.'
This makes me know. I have felt in myself a long time that he was suffering; I have had the feeling of him in me. I knew, yes, I did know he wanted me, and you, I felt it. j have had the feeling of him upon me this last three months especially ... I have been cruel to him.'
' Well-we 'll go to him now, shall we?' I said.
'To-morrow-to morrow,' she replied, noticing me really for the first time. ` I go in the morning.'
'And I'll go with you.'
' Yes-in the morning. Lettie has her party to Chatsworth-don't tell her-we won't tell her.'
'No,' said I.
Shortly after, my mother went upstairs. Lettie came in rather late from Highclose; Leslie did not come in. In the morning they were going with a motor party into Matloclc and Chatsworth, and she was excited, and did not observe anything.
After all, mother and I could not set out until the warm, tempered afternoon. The air was full of a soft yellowness when we stepped down from the train at Cossethay. My mother insisted on walking the long two miles to the village. We went slowly along the road, lingering over the little red flowers in the high hedge-bottom up the hill-side. We were reluctant to come to our destination. As we came in sight of the little grey tower of the church, we heard the sound of braying, brassy music. Before us, filling a little croft, the Wakes was in full swing.
Some wooden horses careered gaily round, and the swingboats leaped into the mild blue sky. We sat upon the stile, my mother and I, and watched. There were booths and coco-nut shies and roundabouts scattered in the small field. Groups of children moved quietly from attraction to attraction. A deeply tanned man came across the field swinging two dripping buckets of water. Women looked from the doors of their brilliant caravans, and lean dogs rose lazily and settled down again under the steps. The fair moved slowly, for all its noise. A stout lady with a husky masculine voice invited the excited children into her peep-show. A swarthy man stood with his thin legs

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Nay, mother, it is only what is shock that makes you say so.' This makes me know. I have felt in myself a long time that he was suffering; I have had what is feeling of him in me. I knew, yes, I did know he wanted me, and you, I felt it. j have had what is feeling of him upon me this last three months especially ... I have been cruel to him.' ' Well-we 'll go to him now, shall we?' I said. 'To-morrow-to morrow,' she replied, noticing me really for what is first time. ` I go in what is morning.' 'And I'll go with you.' ' Yes-in what is morning. Lettie has her party to Chatsworth-don't tell her-we won't tell her.' 'No,' said I. Shortly after, my mother went upstairs. Lettie came in rather late from Highclose; Leslie did not come in. In what is morning they were going with a motor party into Matloclc and Chatsworth, and she was excited, and did not observe anything. After all, mother and I could not set out until what is warm, tempered afternoon. what is air was full of a soft yellowness when we stepped down from what is train at Cossethay. My mother insisted on walking what is long two miles to what is village. We went slowly along what is road, lingering over what is little red flowers in what is high hedge-bottom up what is hill-side. We were reluctant to come to our destination. As we came in sight of what is little grey tower of what is church, we heard what is sound of braying, brassy music. Before us, filling a little croft, what is Wakes was in full swing. Some wooden horses careered gaily round, and what is swingboats leaped into what is mild blue sky. We sat upon what is stile, my mother and I, and watched. There were booths and coco-nut shies and roundabouts scattered in what is small field. Groups of children moved quietly from attraction to attraction. A deeply tanned man came across what is field swinging two dripping buckets of water. Women looked from what is doors of their brilliant caravans, and lean dogs rose lazily and settled down again under what is steps. what is fair moved slowly, for all its noise. A stout lady with a husky masculine voice invited what is excited children into her peep-show. A swarthy man stood with his thin legs where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 39 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" 'Nay, mother, it is only what is shock that makes you say so.' This makes me know. I have felt in myself a long time that he was suffering; I have had what is feeling of him in me. I knew, yes, I did know he wanted me, and you, I felt it. j have had what is feeling of him upon me this last three months especially ... I have been cruel to him.' ' Well-we 'll go to him now, shall we?' I said. 'To-morrow-to morrow,' she replied, noticing me really for what is first time. ` I go in what is morning.' 'And I'll go with you.' ' Yes-in what is morning. Lettie has her party to Chatsworth-don't tell her-we won't tell her.' 'No,' said I. Shortly after, my mother went upstairs. Lettie came in rather late from Highclose; Leslie did not come in. In what is morning they were going with a motor party into Matloclc and Chatsworth, and she was excited, and did not observe anything. After all, mother and I could not set out until what is warm, tempered afternoon. what is air was full of a soft yellowness when we stepped down from what is train at Cossethay. My mother insisted on walking what is long two miles to what is village. We went slowly along what is road, lingering over what is little red flowers in what is high hedge-bottom up what is hill-side. We were reluctant to come to our destination. As we came in sight of what is little grey tower of what is church, we heard what is sound of braying, brassy music. Before us, filling a little croft, what is Wakes was in full swing. Some wooden horses careered gaily round, and what is swingboats leaped into what is mild blue sky. We sat upon what is stile, my mother and I, and watched. There were booths and coco-nut shies and roundabouts scattered in what is small field. Groups of children moved quietly from attraction to attraction. A deeply tanned man came across what is field swinging two dripping buckets of water. Women looked from what is doors of their brilliant caravans, and lean dogs rose lazily and settled down again under what is steps. what is fair moved slowly, for all its noise. A stout lady with a husky masculine voice invited what is excited children into her peep-show. A swarthy man stood with his thin legs where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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