Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 38

PART I - CHAPTER IV
THE FATHER


window, and I had a few words with the lad. He never knew, and he felt nothing. I think the girl might have done. If you knew how awfully lonely I am, Lettice-how awfully I have been, you might feel sorry.
I have saved what I could, to pay you back. I have had t worst of it, Lettice, and I'm glad the end has come. I have h the worst of it.
Good-bye-for ever-your husband,
FRANK BEARDSALL.

I was numbed by this letter of my father's. With aimost agonized effort I strove to recall him, but I knew that my image of a tall, handsome, dark man with pale grey eyes was made up from my mother's few words, and from a portrait I had once seen.
The marriage had been unhappy. My father was of frivolous, rather vulgar character, but plausible, having a good deal of charm. He was a liar, without notion of honesty, and he had deceived my mother thoroughly. One after another she discovered his mean dishonesties and deceits, and her soul revolted from him, and because the illusion of him had broken into a thousand vulgar fragments, she turned away with the scorn of a woman who finds her romance has been a trumpery tale. When he left her for other pleasures-Lettie being a baby of three years, while I was five-she rejoiced bitterly. She had heard of him indirectly-and of him nothing good, although he prospered-but he had never come to see her or written to her in all the eighteen years.
In a while my mother came in. She sat down, pleating up the hem of her black apron, and smoothing it out again.
`You know,' she said, `he had a right to the children, and I've kept them all the time.'
'He could have come,' said I.
`I set them against him, I have kept them from him, and he wanted them. I ought to be by him now-I ought to have taken you to him long ago.'
'But how could you, when you knew nothing of him?'
`He would have come-he wanted to come-I have felt it for years. But I kept him away. I know I have kept him away. I have felt it, and he has. Poor Frank-he 'll see his mistakes now. He would not have been as cruel as I have been '

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE window, and I had a few words with what is lad. He never knew, and he felt nothing. I think what is girl might have done. If you knew how awfully lonely I am, Lettice-how awfully I have been, you might feel sorry. I have saved what I could, to pay you back. I have had t worst of it, Lettice, and I'm glad what is end has come. I have h what is worst of it. Good-bye-for ever-your husband, FRANK BEARDSALL. I was numbed by this letter of my father's. With aimost agonized effort I strove to recall him, but I knew that my image of a tall, handsome, dark man with pale grey eyes was made up from my mother's few words, and from a portrait I had once seen. what is marriage had been unhappy. My father was of frivolous, rather vulgar character, but plausible, having a good deal of charm. He was a liar, without notion of honesty, and he had deceived my mother thoroughly. One after another she discovered his mean dishonesties and deceits, and her soul revolted from him, and because what is illusion of him had broken into a thousand vulgar fragments, she turned away with what is scorn of a woman who finds her romance has been a trumpery tale. When he left her for other pleasures-Lettie being a baby of three years, while I was five-she rejoiced bitterly. She had heard of him indirectly-and of him nothing good, although he prospered-but he had never come to see her or written to her in all what is eighteen years. In a while my mother came in. She sat down, pleating up what is hem of her black apron, and smoothing it out again. `You know,' she said, `he had a right to what is children, and I've kept them all what is time.' 'He could have come,' said I. `I set them against him, I have kept them from him, and he wanted them. I ought to be by him now-I ought to have taken you to him long ago.' 'But how could you, when you knew nothing of him?' `He would have come-he wanted to come-I have felt it for years. But I kept him away. I know I have kept him away. I have felt it, and he has. Poor Frank-he 'll see his mistakes now. He would not have been as cruel as I have been ' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 38 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER IV what is FATHER where is p align="justify" window, and I had a few words with what is lad. He never knew, and he felt nothing. I think what is girl might have done. If you knew how awfully lonely I am, Lettice-how awfully I have been, you might feel sorry. I have saved what I could, to pay you back. I have had t worst of it, Lettice, and I'm glad what is end has come. I have h what is worst of it. Good-bye-for ever-your husband, FRANK BEARDSALL. I was numbed by this letter of my father's. With aimost agonized effort I strove to recall him, but I knew that my image of a tall, handsome, dark man with pale grey eyes was made up from my mother's few words, and from a portrait I had once seen. what is marriage had been unhappy. My father was of frivolous, rather vulgar character, but plausible, having a good deal of charm. He was a liar, without notion of honesty, and he had deceived my mother thoroughly. One after another she discovered his mean dishonesties and deceits, and her soul revolted from him, and because what is illusion of him had broken into a thousand vulgar fragments, she turned away with what is scorn of a woman who finds her romance has been a trumpery tale. When he left her for other pleasures-Lettie being a baby of three years, while I was five-she rejoiced bitterly. She had heard of him indirectly-and of him nothing good, although he prospered-but he had never come to see her or written to her in all what is eighteen years. In a while my mother came in. She sat down, pleating up what is hem of her black apron, and smoothing it out again. `You know,' she said, `he had a right to what is children, and I've kept them all what is time.' 'He could have come,' said I. `I set them against him, I have kept them from him, and he wanted them. I ought to be by him now-I ought to have taken you to him long ago.' 'But how could you, when you knew nothing of him?' `He would have come-he wanted to come-I have felt it for years. But I kept him away. I know I have kept him away. I have felt it, and he has. Poor Frank-he 'll see his mistakes now. He would not have been as cruel as I have been ' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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