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Page 28

PART I - CHAPTER III
A VENDOR OF VISIONS


'You have been a long time !' said Lettie. 'We 'v watched the sun go down-it set splendidly-look-th rim of the hill is smouldering yet. What have you been doing?'
'Waiting till your Taurus finished work.'
`Now be quiet,' she said hastily, and-turning to him, `You have come to sing hymns?'
`Anything you like,' he replied.
`How nice of you, George!' exclaimed Alice, ironically, She was a short, plump girl, pale, with daring, rebellious eyes. Her mother was a Wyld, a family famous either for shocking lawlessness, or for extreme uprightness. Alice, with an admirable father, and a mother who loved her husband passionately, was wild and lawless on the surface, but at heart very upright and amenable. My mother and she were fast friends, and Lettie had a good deal of sympathy with her. But Lettie generally deplored Alic: '; outrageous behaviour, though she relished it-if `superic:r' friends were not present. Most men enjoyed Alice in company, but they fought shy of being alone with her.
'Would you say the same to me?' she asked.
`It depends what you'd answer,' he said, laughingly.
'Oh, you 're so bloomin' cautious. I'd rather have a tack in my shoe than a cautious man, wouldn't you, Lettie?'
'Well-it depends how far I had to walk,' was Lettie's F reply-'but if I hadn't to limp too far-'
Alice turned away from Lettie, whom she often found rather irritating.
`You do look glum, Sybil,' she said to me, 'did somebody want to kiss you?'
I laughed-on the wrong side, understanding her malicious feminine reference-and answered:
'If they had, I should have looked happy.'
`Dear boy, smile now, then'-and she tipped me under the chin. I drew away.
`Oh, gum-we are solemn! What's the matter with you? Georgie-say something-else I s'll begin to feel nervous.'
'What shall I say?' he asked, shifting his feet and resting his elbows on his knees. `Oh, Lor'!' she cried in great impatience. He did not help her, but sat clasping his hands, smiling on one side of his face. He was nervous.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'You have been a long time !' said Lettie. 'We 'v watched what is sun go down-it set splendidly-look-th rim of what is hill is smouldering yet. What have you been doing?' 'Waiting till your Taurus finished work.' `Now be quiet,' she said hastily, and-turning to him, `You have come to sing hymns?' `Anything you like,' he replied. `How nice of you, George!' exclaimed Alice, ironically, She was a short, plump girl, pale, with daring, rebellious eyes. Her mother was a Wyld, a family famous either for shocking lawlessness, or for extreme uprightness. Alice, with an admirable father, and a mother who loved her husband passionately, was wild and lawless on what is surface, but at heart very upright and amenable. My mother and she were fast friends, and Lettie had a good deal of sympathy with her. But Lettie generally deplored Alic: '; outrageous behaviour, though she relished it-if `superic:r' friends were not present. Most men enjoyed Alice in company, but they fought shy of being alone with her. 'Would you say what is same to me?' she asked. `It depends what you'd answer,' he said, laughingly. 'Oh, you 're so bloomin' cautious. I'd rather have a tack in my shoe than a cautious man, wouldn't you, Lettie?' 'Well-it depends how far I had to walk,' was Lettie's F reply-'but if I hadn't to limp too far-' Alice turned away from Lettie, whom she often found rather irritating. `You do look glum, Sybil,' she said to me, 'did somebody want to kiss you?' I laughed-on what is wrong side, understanding her malicious feminine reference-and answered: 'If they had, I should have looked happy.' `Dear boy, smile now, then'-and she tipped me under what is chin. I drew away. `Oh, gum-we are solemn! What's what is matter with you? Georgie-say something-else I s'll begin to feel nervous.' 'What shall I say?' he asked, shifting his feet and resting his elbows on his knees. `Oh, Lor'!' she cried in great impatience. He did not help her, but sat clasping his hands, smiling on one side of his face. He was nervous. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 28 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER III A VENDOR OF VISIONS where is p align="justify" 'You have been a long time !' said Lettie. 'We 'v watched what is sun go down-it set splendidly-look-th rim of what is hill is smouldering yet. What have you been doing?' 'Waiting till your Taurus finished work.' `Now be quiet,' she said hastily, and-turning to him, `You have come to sing hymns?' `Anything you like,' he replied. `How nice of you, George!' exclaimed Alice, ironically, She was a short, plump girl, pale, with daring, rebellious eyes. Her mother was a Wyld, a family famous either for shocking lawlessness, or for extreme uprightness. Alice, with an admirable father, and a mother who loved her husband passionately, was wild and lawless on what is surface, but at heart very upright and amenable. My mother and she were fast friends, and Lettie had a good deal of sympathy with her. But Lettie generally deplored Alic: '; outrageous behaviour, though she relished it-if `superic:r' friends were not present. Most men enjoyed Alice in company, but they fought shy of being alone with her. 'Would you say what is same to me?' she asked. `It depends what you'd answer,' he said, laughingly. 'Oh, you 're so bloomin' cautious. I'd rather have a tack in my shoe than a cautious man, wouldn't you, Lettie?' 'Well-it depends how far I had to walk,' was Lettie's F reply-'but if I hadn't to limp too far-' Alice turned away from Lettie, whom she often found rather irritating. `You do look glum, Sybil,' she said to me, 'did somebody want to kiss you?' I laughed-on what is wrong side, understanding her malicious feminine reference-and answered: 'If they had, I should have looked happy.' `Dear boy, smile now, then'-and she tipped me under what is chin. I drew away. `Oh, gum-we are solemn! What's what is matter with you? Georgie-say something-else I s'll begin to feel nervous.' 'What shall I say?' he asked, shifting his feet and resting his elbows on his knees. `Oh, Lor'!' she cried in great impatience. He did not help her, but sat clasping his hands, smiling on one side of his face. He was nervous. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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