Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 17

PART I - CHAPTER II
DANGLING THE APPLE


He had struck the spade into the ground, and hauled up the cat and the iron goose.
`Well, he said, surveying the hideous object, 'haven't her good looks gone! She was a fine cat.'
`Bury it and have done,' Lettie replied.
He did so, asking: `Shall you have bad dreams after it?'
`Dreams do not trouble me,' she answered, turning away.
We went indoors, into the parlour, where Emily sat by a window, biting her finger. The room was long and not very high; there was a great rough beam across the ceiling. On the mantelpiece, and in the fire-place, and over the piano were wild flowers and fresh leaves plentifully scattered; the room was cool with the scent of the woods.
`Has he done it?' asked Emily-'and did you watch him? If I had seen it I should have hated the sight of him, and I'd rather have touched a maggot than him.'
`I shouldn't be particularly pleased if he touched me,' said Lettie.
`There is something so loathsome about callousness and brutality,' said Emily. `He fills me with disgust.'
'Does he?' said Lettie, smiling coldly. She went across to the old piano. `He 's only healthy. He 's never been sick, not, anyway, yet.' She sat down and played at random, letting the numbed notes fall like dead leaves from the haughty, ancient piano.
Emily and I talked on by the window, about books and people. She was intensely serious, and generally succeeded in reducing me to the same state.
After a while, when the milking and feeding were finished, George came in. Lettie was still playing the piano. He asked her why she didn't play something with a tune in it, and this caused her to turn round in her chair to give him a withering answer. His appearance, however, scattered her words like startled birds. He had come straight from washing in the scullery, to the parlour, and he stood behind Lettie's chair unconcernedly wiping the moisture from his arms. His sleeves were rolled up to the shoulder, and his shirt was opened wide at the breast. Lettie was somewhat taken aback by the sight of him standing with legs apart, dressed in dirty leggings and boots, and breeches torn at the knee, naked at the breast and arms.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He had struck what is spade into what is ground, and hauled up what is cat and what is iron goose. `Well, he said, surveying what is hideous object, 'haven't her good looks gone! She was a fine cat.' `Bury it and have done,' Lettie replied. He did so, asking: `Shall you have bad dreams after it?' `Dreams do not trouble me,' she answered, turning away. We went indoors, into what is parlour, where Emily sat by a window, biting her finger. what is room was long and not very high; there was a great rough beam across what is ceiling. On what is mantelpiece, and in what is fire-place, and over what is piano were wild flowers and fresh leaves plentifully scattered; what is room was cool with what is scent of what is woods. `Has he done it?' asked Emily-'and did you watch him? If I had seen it I should have hated what is sight of him, and I'd rather have touched a maggot than him.' `I shouldn't be particularly pleased if he touched me,' said Lettie. `There is something so loathsome about callousness and brutality,' said Emily. `He fills me with disgust.' 'Does he?' said Lettie, smiling coldly. She went across to what is old piano. `He 's only healthy. He 's never been sick, not, anyway, yet.' She sat down and played at random, letting what is numbed notes fall like dead leaves from what is haughty, ancient piano. Emily and I talked on by what is window, about books and people. She was intensely serious, and generally succeeded in reducing me to what is same state. After a while, when what is milking and feeding were finished, George came in. Lettie was still playing what is piano. He asked her why she didn't play something with a tune in it, and this caused her to turn round in her chair to give him a withering answer. His appearance, however, scattered her words like startled birds. He had come straight from washing in what is scullery, to what is parlour, and he stood behind Lettie's chair unconcernedly wiping what is moisture from his arms. His sleeves were rolled up to what is shoulder, and his shirt was opened wide at what is breast. Lettie was somewhat taken aback by what is sight of him standing with legs apart, dressed in dirty leggings and boots, and breeches torn at what is knee, naked at what is breast and arms. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 17 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER II DANGLING what is APPLE where is p align="justify" He had struck what is spade into what is ground, and hauled up what is cat and what is iron goose. `Well, he said, surveying what is hideous object, 'haven't her good looks gone! She was a fine cat.' `Bury it and have done,' Lettie replied. He did so, asking: `Shall you have bad dreams after it?' `Dreams do not trouble me,' she answered, turning away. We went indoors, into what is parlour, where Emily sat by a window, biting her finger. what is room was long and not very high; there was a great rough beam across what is ceiling. On what is mantelpiece, and in what is fire-place, and over what is piano were wild flowers and fresh leaves plentifully scattered; what is room was cool with what is scent of what is woods. `Has he done it?' asked Emily-'and did you watch him? If I had seen it I should have hated what is sight of him, and I'd rather have touched a maggot than him.' `I shouldn't be particularly pleased if he touched me,' said Lettie. `There is something so loathsome about callousness and brutality,' said Emily. `He fills me with disgust.' 'Does he?' said Lettie, smiling coldly. She went across to what is old piano. `He 's only healthy. He 's never been sick, not, anyway, yet.' She sat down and played at random, letting what is numbed notes fall like dead leaves from what is haughty, ancient piano. Emily and I talked on by what is window, about books and people. She was intensely serious, and generally succeeded in reducing me to what is same state. After a while, when what is milking and feeding were finished, George came in. Lettie was still playing what is piano. He asked her why she didn't play something with a tune in it, and this caused her to turn round in her chair to give him a withering answer. His appearance, however, scattered her words like startled birds. He had come straight from washing in what is scullery, to what is parlour, and he stood behind Lettie's chair unconcernedly wiping what is moisture from his arms. His sleeves were rolled up to what is shoulder, and his shirt was opened wide at what is breast. Lettie was somewhat taken aback by what is sight of him standing with legs apart, dressed in dirty leggings and boots, and breeches torn at what is knee, naked at what is breast and arms. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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