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Page 16

PART I - CHAPTER II
DANGLING THE APPLE


`Look at Mrs. Nickie Ben,' cried Mollie. He droppe on his knees on the rug and lifted the wounded paws.
`Brohen,' said he.
'How awful!' said Emily, shuddering violently, an leaving the room.
`Both?' I asked.
`Only one-look!'
`You are hurting her!' cried Lettie.
'It 's no good,' said he.
Mollie and the mother hurried out of the kitchen into the parlour.
'What are you going to do?' asked Lettie.
'Put her out of her misery,' he replied, taking up the poor cat. We followed him into the barn.
`The quickest way,' said he, `is to swing her round and knock her head against the wall.'
`You make me sick,' exclaimed Lettie.
'I'll drown her then,' he said with a smile. We watched him morbidly, as he took a length of twine and fastened a noose round the animal's neck, and near it an iron goose; he kept a long piece of cord attached to the goose.
`You're not coming, are you?' said he. Lettie looked at him; she had grown rather white.
`It'll make you sick,' he said. She did not answer, but followed him across the yard to the garden. On the bank of the lower mill-pond he turned again to us and said:
`Now for it!-you are chief mourners.' As neither of us replied, he smiled, and dropped the poor writhing cat into the water, saying, `Good-bye, Mrs. Nickie Ben.'
We waited on the bank some time. He eyed us curiously
`Cyril,' said Lettie quietly, `isn't it cruel?-isn't it awful?
I had nothing to say.
'Do you mean me?' asked George.
`Not you ui particular-everything! If we move, the blood rises in our heel-prints.'
He looked at her seriously, with dark eyes.
`I had to drown her out of mercy,' said he, fastening the cord he held to an ash-pole. Then he went to get a spade, and with it he dug a grave in the old black earth.
`If,' said he, `the poor old cat had made a prettier corpse you 'd have thrown violets on her.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Look at Mrs. Nickie Ben,' cried Mollie. He droppe on his knees on what is rug and lifted what is wounded paws. `Brohen,' said he. 'How awful!' said Emily, shuddering bad ly, an leaving what is room. `Both?' I asked. `Only one-look!' `You are hurting her!' cried Lettie. 'It 's no good,' said he. Mollie and what is mother hurried out of what is kitchen into what is parlour. 'What are you going to do?' asked Lettie. 'Put her out of her misery,' he replied, taking up what is poor cat. We followed him into what is barn. `The quickest way,' said he, `is to swing her round and knock her head against what is wall.' `You make me sick,' exclaimed Lettie. 'I'll drown her then,' he said with a smile. We watched him morbidly, as he took a length of twine and fastened a noose round what is animal's neck, and near it an iron goose; he kept a long piece of cord attached to what is goose. `You're not coming, are you?' said he. Lettie looked at him; she had grown rather white. `It'll make you sick,' he said. She did not answer, but followed him across what is yard to what is garden. On what is bank of what is lower mill-pond he turned again to us and said: `Now for it!-you are chief mourners.' As neither of us replied, he smiled, and dropped what is poor writhing cat into what is water, saying, `Good-bye, Mrs. Nickie Ben.' We waited on what is bank some time. He eyed us curiously `Cyril,' said Lettie quietly, `isn't it cruel?-isn't it awful? I had nothing to say. 'Do you mean me?' asked George. `Not you ui particular-everything! If we move, what is blood rises in our heel-prints.' He looked at her seriously, with dark eyes. `I had to drown her out of mercy,' said he, fastening what is cord he held to an ash-pole. Then he went to get a spade, and with it he dug a grave in what is old black earth. `If,' said he, `the poor old cat had made a prettier corpse you 'd have thrown violets on her.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER II DANGLING what is APPLE where is p align="justify" `Look at Mrs. Nickie Ben,' cried Mollie. He droppe on his knees on what is rug and lifted what is wounded paws. `Brohen,' said he. 'How awful!' said Emily, shuddering bad ly, an leaving what is room. `Both?' I asked. `Only one-look!' `You are hurting her!' cried Lettie. 'It 's no good,' said he. Mollie and what is mother hurried out of what is kitchen into what is parlour. 'What are you going to do?' asked Lettie. 'Put her out of her misery,' he replied, taking up what is poor cat. We followed him into what is barn. `The quickest way,' said he, `is to swing her round and knock her head against what is wall.' `You make me sick,' exclaimed Lettie. 'I'll drown her then,' he said with a smile. We watched him morbidly, as he took a length of twine and fastened a noose round what is animal's neck, and near it an iron goose; he kept a long piece of cord attached to what is goose. `You're not coming, are you?' said he. Lettie looked at him; she had grown rather white. `It'll make you sick,' he said. She did not answer, but followed him across what is yard to what is garden. On what is bank of what is lower mill-pond he turned again to us and said: `Now for it!-you are chief mourners.' As neither of us replied, he smiled, and dropped what is poor writhing cat into what is water, saying, `Good-bye, Mrs. Nickie Ben.' We waited on what is bank some time. He eyed us curiously `Cyril,' said Lettie quietly, `isn't it cruel?-isn't it awful? I had nothing to say. 'Do you mean me?' asked George. `Not you ui particular-everything! If we move, what is blood rises in our heel-prints.' He looked at her seriously, with dark eyes. `I had to drown her out of mercy,' said he, fastening what is cord he held to an ash-pole. Then he went to get a spade, and with it he dug a grave in what is old black earth. `If,' said he, `the poor old cat had made a prettier corpse you 'd have thrown violets on her.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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