Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 12

PART I - CHAPTER I
THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE


ran along the end of our lakelet, Nethermere, for abont a quarter of a mile. Nethennere is the lowest in a chain of three ponds. The other two are the upper and lower millponds at Strelley: this is the largest and most charmin<, piece of water, a mile long and about a quarter of a mile in width. Our wood runs down to the water's edge. On the opposite side, on a hill beyond the farthest corner of the lake, stands Highclose. It looks across the water at us in Woodside with one eye as it were, while our cottage casts a sidelong glance back again at the proud house, and peeps coyly through the trees.
I could see Lettie like a distant sail stealing along the water's edge, her parasol flowing above. She turned through the wicket under the pine clump,. climbed the steep field, and was enfolded again in the trees beside Highclose.
Leslie was sprawled on a camp chair, under a copperbeech on the lawn, his cigar glowing. He watched the ash grow strange and grey in the warm daylight, and he felt sorry for poor Nell Wycherley, whom he had driven that morning to the station, for would she not be frightfully cut up as the train whirled her farther and farther away? These girls are so daft with a fellow! But she was a nice little thing-he 'd get Marie to write to her.
At this point he caught sight of a parasol fluttering alon~, the drive, and immediately he fell into a deep sleep, with just a tiny slit in his slumber to allow him to see Lettie approach. She, finding her watchman ungallantly asleep, and his cigar, instead of his lamp, untrimmed, broke off a twig of syringa whose ivory buds had not yet burst with luscious scent. I know not how the end of his nose tickled in anticipation before she tickled him in reality, but he kept bravely still until the petals swept him. Then, starting from his sleep, he exclaimed:
`Lettie! I was dreaming of kisses!'
'On the bridge of your nose?' laughed she. `But whose wc:re the kisses?'
`Who produced the sensation?' he smiled.
'Since I only tapped your nose you should dream of '
'Go on!' said he, expectantly.

Page 13

PART I - CHAPTER I
THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE


of Doctor Slop,' she replied, smiling to herself as she closed her parasol.
` I do not know the gentleman,' he said, afraid that she was laughing at him.
'No-your nose is quite classic,' she answered, giving him one of those brief intimate glances with which women flatter men so cleverly. He radiated with pleasure.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ran along what is end of our lakelet, Nethermere, for abont a quarter of a mile. Nethennere is what is lowest in a chain of three ponds. what is other two are what is upper and lower millponds at Strelley: this is what is largest and most charmin<, piece of water, a mile long and about a quarter of a mile in width. Our wood runs down to what is water's edge. On what is opposite side, on a hill beyond what is farthest corner of what is lake, stands Highclose. It looks across what is water at us in Woodside with one eye as it were, while our cottage casts a sidelong glance back again at what is proud house, and peeps coyly through what is trees. I could see Lettie like a distant sail stealing along what is water's edge, her parasol flowing above. She turned through what is wicket under what is pine clump,. climbed what is steep field, and was enfolded again in what is trees beside Highclose. Leslie was sprawled on a camp chair, under a copperbeech on what is lawn, his cigar glowing. He watched what is ash grow strange and grey in what is warm daylight, and he felt sorry for poor Nell Wycherley, whom he had driven that morning to what is station, for would she not be frightfully cut up as what is train whirled her farther and farther away? These girls are so daft with a fellow! But she was a nice little thing-he 'd get Marie to write to her. At this point he caught sight of a parasol fluttering alon~, what is drive, and immediately he fell into a deep sleep, with just a tiny slit in his slumber to allow him to see Lettie approach. She, finding her watchman ungallantly asleep, and his cigar, instead of his lamp, untrimmed, broke off a twig of syringa whose ivory buds had not yet burst with luscious scent. I know not how what is end of his nose tickled in anticipation before she tickled him in reality, but he kept bravely still until what is petals swept him. Then, starting from his sleep, he exclaimed: `Lettie! I was dreaming of kisses!' 'On what is bridge of your nose?' laughed she. `But whose wc:re what is kisses?' `Who produced what is sensation?' he smiled. 'Since I only tapped your nose you should dream of ' 'Go on!' said he, expectantly. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 12 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER I what is PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE where is p align="justify" ran along what is end of our lakelet, Nethermere, for abont a quarter of a mile. Nethennere is what is lowest in a chain of three ponds. what is other two are what is upper and lower millponds at Strelley: this is what is largest and most charmin<, piece of water, a mile long and about a quarter of a mile in width. Our wood runs down to what is water's edge. On what is opposite side, on a hill beyond what is farthest corner of what is lake, stands Highclose. It looks across what is water at us in Woodside with one eye as it were, while our cottage casts a sidelong glance back again at what is proud house, and peeps coyly through what is trees. I could see Lettie like a distant sail stealing along what is water's edge, her parasol flowing above. She turned through what is wicket under what is pine clump,. climbed what is steep field, and was enfolded again in what is trees beside Highclose. Leslie was sprawled on a camp chair, under a copperbeech on what is lawn, his cigar glowing. He watched what is ash grow strange and grey in what is warm daylight, and he felt sorry for poor Nell Wycherley, whom he had driven that morning to what is station, for would she not be frightfully cut up as what is train whirled her farther and farther away? These girls are so daft with a fellow! But she was a nice little thing-he 'd get Marie to write to her. At this point he caught sight of a parasol fluttering alon~, what is drive, and immediately he fell into a deep sleep, with just a tiny slit in his slumber to allow him to see Lettie approach. She, finding her watchman ungallantly asleep, and his cigar, instead of his lamp, untrimmed, broke off a twig of syringa whose ivory buds had not yet burst with luscious scent. I know not how what is end of his nose tickled in anticipation before she tickled him in reality, but he kept bravely still until what is petals swept him. Then, starting from his sleep, he exclaimed: `Lettie! I was dreaming of kisses!' 'On what is bridge of your nose?' laughed she. `But whose wc:re what is kisses?' `Who produced what is sensation?' he smiled. 'Since I only tapped your nose you should dream of ' 'Go on!' said he, expectantly. where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER I THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE where is p align="justify" of Doctor Slop,' she replied, smiling to herself as she closed her parasol. ` I do not know what is gentleman,' he said, afraid that she was laughing at him. 'No-your nose is quite classic,' she answered, giving him one of those brief intimate glances with which women flatter men so cleverly. He radiated with pleasure. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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