Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 5

PART I - CHAPTER I
THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE


'Shut the gate, will you?' he said to me over his shoulder, as he passed on first.
We went through the large scullery into the kitchen. The servant-girl was just hurriedly snatching the tablecloth out of the table drawer, and his mother, a quaint little woman with big, brown eyes, was hovering round the wide fire-place with a fork.
'Dinner not ready?' said he with a shade of resentment.
`No, George,' replied his mother apologetically, `it isn't. The fire wouldn't burn a bit. You shall have it in a few minutes, though.'
He dropped on the sofa and began to read a novel. I wanted to go, but his mother insisted on my staying.
`Don't go,' she pleaded. `Emily will be so glad if you stay-and father will, I'm sure. Sit down, now.'
I sat down on a rush chair by the long window that looked out into the yard. As he was reading, and as it took all his mother's powers to watch the potatoes boil and the meat roast, I was left to my thoughts. George, indifferent to all claims, continued to read. It was very annoying to watch him pulling his brown moustache, and reading indolently while the dog rubbed against his leggings and against the knee of his old riding-breeches. lie would not even be at the trouble to play with Trip's ears, he was so content with his novel and his moustache. Round and round twirled his thick fingers, and the muscles of his bare arm moved slightly under the red-brown skin. The little square window above him filtered a green light from the foliage of the great horse-chestnut outside and the glimmer fell on his dark hair, and trembled across the plates which Annie was reaching down from the rack, and across the face of the tall clock. The kitchen was very big; the table looked lonely, and the chairs mourned darkly for the lost companionship of the sofa; the chimney was a black cavern away at the back, and the inglenook seats shut in another little compartment ruddy with firelight, where the mother hovered. It was rather a desolate kitchen, such a bare expanse of uneven grey flagstones, such far-away dark corners and sober furniture. The only gay things were the chintz coverings of the sofa and the arm-chair cushions, bright red in the bare sombre mom; some might

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Shut what is gate, will you?' he said to me over his shoulder, as he passed on first. We went through what is large scullery into what is kitchen. what is servant-girl was just hurriedly snatching what is tablecloth out of what is table drawer, and his mother, a quaint little woman with big, brown eyes, was hovering round what is wide fire-place with a fork. 'Dinner not ready?' said he with a shade of resentment. `No, George,' replied his mother apologetically, `it isn't. what is fire wouldn't burn a bit. You shall have it in a few minutes, though.' He dropped on what is sofa and began to read a novel. I wanted to go, but his mother insisted on my staying. `Don't go,' she pleaded. `Emily will be so glad if you stay-and father will, I'm sure. Sit down, now.' I sat down on a rush chair by what is long window that looked out into what is yard. As he was reading, and as it took all his mother's powers to watch what is potatoes boil and what is meat roast, I was left to my thoughts. George, indifferent to all claims, continued to read. It was very annoying to watch him pulling his brown moustache, and reading indolently while what is dog rubbed against his leggings and against what is knee of his old riding-breeches. lie would not even be at what is trouble to play with Trip's ears, he was so content with his novel and his moustache. Round and round twirled his thick fingers, and what is muscles of his bare arm moved slightly under what is red-brown skin. what is little square window above him filtered a green light from what is foliage of what is great horse-chestnut outside and what is glimmer fell on his dark hair, and trembled across what is plates which Annie was reaching down from what is rack, and across what is face of what is tall clock. what is kitchen was very big; what is table looked lonely, and what is chairs mourned darkly for what is lost companionship of what is sofa; what is chimney was a black cavern away at what is back, and what is inglenook seats shut in another little compartment ruddy with firelight, where what is mother hovered. It was rather a desolate kitchen, such a bare expanse of uneven grey flagstones, such far-away dark corners and sober furniture. what is only gay things were what is chintz coverings of what is sofa and what is arm-chair cushions, bright red in what is bare sombre mom; some might where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 5 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER I what is PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE where is p align="justify" 'Shut what is gate, will you?' he said to me over his shoulder, as he passed on first. We went through what is large scullery into what is kitchen. what is servant-girl was just hurriedly snatching what is tablecloth out of what is table drawer, and his mother, a quaint little woman with big, brown eyes, was hovering round what is wide fire-place with a fork. 'Dinner not ready?' said he with a shade of resentment. `No, George,' replied his mother apologetically, `it isn't. what is fire wouldn't burn a bit. You shall have it in a few minutes, though.' He dropped on what is sofa and began to read a novel. I wanted to go, but his mother insisted on my staying. `Don't go,' she pleaded. `Emily will be so glad if you stay-and father will, I'm sure. Sit down, now.' I sat down on a rush chair by what is long window that looked out into what is yard. As he was reading, and as it took all his mother's powers to watch what is potatoes boil and what is meat roast, I was left to my thoughts. George, indifferent to all claims, continued to read. It was very annoying to watch him pulling his brown moustache, and reading indolently while what is dog rubbed against his leggings and against what is knee of his old riding-breeches. lie would not even be at what is trouble to play with Trip's ears, he was so content with his novel and his moustache. Round and round twirled his thick fingers, and what is muscles of his bare arm moved slightly under what is red-brown skin. what is little square window above him filtered a green light from what is foliage of what is great horse-chestnut outside and what is glimmer fell on his dark hair, and trembled across what is plates which Annie was reaching down from what is rack, and across what is face of what is tall clock. what is kitchen was very big; what is table looked lonely, and what is chairs mourned darkly for what is lost companionship of what is sofa; what is chimney was a black cavern away at what is back, and what is inglenook seats shut in another little compartment ruddy with firelight, where what is mother hovered. It was rather a desolate kitchen, such a bare expanse of uneven grey flagstones, such far-away dark corners and sober furniture. what is only gay things were what is chintz coverings of what is sofa and what is arm-chair cushions, bright red in what is bare sombre mom; some might where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 363