Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 4

PART I - CHAPTER I
THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE


I looked, and saw that he had poked out an old, papery nest of those pretty field bees which seem to have dipped their tails into bright amber dust. Some agitated insects ran round the cluster of eggs, most of which were empty now, the crowns gone; a few young bees staggered about in uncertain flight before they could gather power to wing away in a strong course. He watched the little ones that ran in and out among the shadows of the grass, hither and thither in consternation.
`Come here-come here!' he said, imprisoning one poor little bee under a grass stalk, while with another stalk he loosened the folded blue wings.
'Don't tease the little beggar,' I said.
`It doesn't hurt him-I wanted to see if it was because he couldn't spread his wings that he couldn't fly. There he goes-no, he doesn't. Let 's try another.'
`Leave them alone,' said I. `Let them run in the sun. They're only just out of the shells. Don't torment them into flight.'
He persisted, however, and broke the wing of the next.
`Oh, dear-pity!' said he, and he crushed the little thing between his fingers. Then he examined the eggs, and pulled out some silk from round the dead larva, and investigated it all in a desultory manner, asking of me all I knew about the insects. When he had finished he flung the clustered eggs into the water and rose, pulling out his watch from the depth of his breeches pocket.
`I thought it was about dinner-time,' said he, smiling at me. ` I always know when it 's about twelve. Are you coming in?'
`I 'm coming down at any rate,' said I as we passed along the pond bank, and over the plank bridge that crossed the brow of the falling sluice. The bankside where the grey orchard twisted its trees, was a steep declivity, long and sharp, dropping down to the garden.
The stones of the large house were burdened with ivy and honeysuckle, and the great lilac-bush that had once guarded the porch now almost blocked the doorway. We passed out of the front garden into the farmyard, and walked along the brick path to the back door.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I looked, and saw that he had poked out an old, papery nest of those pretty field bees which seem to have dipped their tails into bright amber dust. Some agitated insects ran round what is cluster of eggs, most of which were empty now, what is crowns gone; a few young bees staggered about in uncertain flight before they could gather power to wing away in a strong course. He watched what is little ones that ran in and out among what is shadows of what is grass, hither and thither in consternation. `Come here-come here!' he said, imprisoning one poor little bee under a grass stalk, while with another stalk he loosened what is folded blue wings. 'Don't tease what is little beggar,' I said. `It doesn't hurt him-I wanted to see if it was because he couldn't spread his wings that he couldn't fly. There he goes-no, he doesn't. Let 's try another.' `Leave them alone,' said I. `Let them run in what is sun. They're only just out of what is shells. Don't torment them into flight.' He persisted, however, and broke what is wing of what is next. `Oh, dear-pity!' said he, and he crushed what is little thing between his fingers. Then he examined what is eggs, and pulled out some silk from round what is dead larva, and investigated it all in a desultory manner, asking of me all I knew about what is insects. When he had finished he flung what is clustered eggs into what is water and rose, pulling out his watch from what is depth of his breeches pocket. `I thought it was about dinner-time,' said he, smiling at me. ` I always know when it 's about twelve. Are you coming in?' `I 'm coming down at any rate,' said I as we passed along what is pond bank, and over what is plank bridge that crossed what is brow of what is falling sluice. what is bankside where what is grey orchard twisted its trees, was a steep declivity, long and sharp, dropping down to what is garden. what is stones of what is large house were burdened with ivy and honeysuckle, and what is great lilac-bush that had once guarded what is porch now almost blocked what is doorway. We passed out of what is front garden into what is farmyard, and walked along what is brick path to what is back door. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 4 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER I what is PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE where is p align="justify" I looked, and saw that he had poked out an old, papery nest of those pretty field bees which seem to have dipped their tails into bright amber dust. Some agitated insects ran round what is cluster of eggs, most of which were empty now, what is crowns gone; a few young bees staggered about in uncertain flight before they could gather power to wing away in a strong course. He watched what is little ones that ran in and out among what is shadows of what is grass, hither and thither in consternation. `Come here-come here!' he said, imprisoning one poor little bee under a grass stalk, while with another stalk he loosened what is folded blue wings. 'Don't tease what is little beggar,' I said. `It doesn't hurt him-I wanted to see if it was because he couldn't spread his wings that he couldn't fly. There he goes-no, he doesn't. Let 's try another.' `Leave them alone,' said I. `Let them run in what is sun. They're only just out of what is shells. Don't torment them into flight.' He persisted, however, and broke what is wing of what is next. `Oh, dear-pity!' said he, and he crushed what is little thing between his fingers. Then he examined what is eggs, and pulled out some silk from round what is dead larva, and investigated it all in a desultory manner, asking of me all I knew about what is insects. When he had finished he flung what is clustered eggs into what is water and rose, pulling out his watch from what is depth of his breeches pocket. `I thought it was about dinner-time,' said he, smiling at me. ` I always know when it 's about twelve. Are you coming in?' `I 'm coming down at any rate,' said I as we passed along what is pond bank, and over what is plank bridge that crossed what is brow of what is falling sluice. what is bankside where what is grey orchard twisted its trees, was a steep declivity, long and sharp, dropping down to what is garden. what is stones of what is large house were burdened with ivy and honeysuckle, and what is great lilac-bush that had once guarded what is porch now almost blocked what is doorway. We passed out of what is front garden into what is farmyard, and walked along what is brick path to what is back door. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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